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Full text of "Pacific fireman"

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SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC j*"*"* . 



3 1223 03475 3617 

REFERENCE BOOK 

Not to be taken from the Library 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/pacificfiremansanf 



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\'()L. IX.-NO. 1. 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, JANUARY 6. 1912. 



Single Copies 5 cents. 



FROM THE HAND ENGINE TO THE AUTO. 

FIRE AND WATER ENGINEER-! 
INC points out that the evolution 
n fire-fighting apparatus is coming in 
for considerable attention just now by 
the magazines of the country. The 
subject, this journal continues, is one 
which seems to interest not only fire 
(1 ipartments, but also citizens gener- 
ally who have closely watched the 
changes with eagerness, foril is doubt- 
ful if there has been a more radical 
, .'in iii any other m .lie sev- 
eral public utilities. In the early 
stages of fire-fighting, skill was a d - 

ible requi ite. Anj i i uld 

handle a bucket <■*' water was eligible 
to membership : the mo t up-to date 
fire department, and for years prior 
tq L850 strong-armed men to operate 
„ , , -,n the hand enirine was the 
,,,,l\ needful power. Practically every 
man was a volunteer firemen I hen. 
II , \ d fferenl to day! 

Th ' handling of at nobile appara- 
tus is ■ ntrusted to only men w ho have 
i ie minutest know ledgeol :ompo- 

nenl parts of the mechanism, who 
,,,,, i not only know how to run the 
i I,, iratus, but must know how to take 
i and reassemble every piece. In 

r words, the modern firemen must 

, machinist and electrician of the 

highest type. And to this end the 

New York Fire C 'here was instituted; 
Here the employes of the fire deparl 

m nt are given a technical I 
in itrucl irs of the highest skill. 

The Miles < ireenwood was in\ ented 
I,, Moses I. itta, and made in I lincin 
M ii and named for the chief of the 

lire tie i ,i nenl of thai city, wl ■- 

ganized i aid fire deparl nl 



in this country in 1853. On its jour- 
ney from Cincinnati to Boston, where 
it was to go into commission, the en- 
gine was exhibited in City Hall Park 
in New York on February 9, 1855. 
The old "hay wagon," the largest and 
most powerful hand engine in the de- 



f the leading hose manufacture! S. 
In 1887, field. Leiter & Co. of Chi- 
cago, suffered heavy damage because 
the fire departments had no ladders 
ii\ whichaline of hose could be taken 
to the fifth story. To-day a tire in the 
fortieth story of a structure can be 



partment, manned by the Exempt En- fought by means of standpipes as 
gine Company, of which Zophar Mills easily as though it were on the main 



was foreman, by request of the com- 
mon council, contested with the Miles 
Greenwood in several trials. In a 
oiital contest the hand engine 
won, and cheei after cheer rent the 

air. The spectators were mostly in 

sympathy with the hand engine. In 

a perpendicular contest 0\ ei the Citj 
Hall cupola, both engines playing at 



II ■, but not with equal pressure. 

The pioneers in automobile appara- 
tus are more numerous than are the 
enturers wi tn engine. 

The Niagara Engine Company of New- 
London. Conn., was the first to possess 
a motor chemical engine and hose wa- 

g October 6, 1903. The Cincinnati 

Underwriters' Salvage Corps secured 



the same time, the hand engine again the first salvag obile in May. 

Field, Mass., boasts the 
do "flying squadron" 
eel Sept* mber 24, 1906. 

Joplin, Mo., had the first pumping 
automobile engine September 7, 1908: 
Vancouver, B. C, had the Brat auto- 
mobile ladder truck in September, 
while New 5 ■ tired the 

first automobile watertower February 

11. 1911, and the first motor-driven 
m.d steam-operated engine March 20, 
1911. During the past year the adop- 
tion of automobile apparatus through- 
out the country has been verj general. 
Some cities have been a little back- 
ward, but in n this has been 
due to the depleted municipal treasu- 
ries. As fast as appropriations can 

a e 

|,| in tor fire appara- 

tus \\ hah has passi d t hi ental 

. :1 iid won h of 

over 



won. as it did at all the distance play- 
ing contests. For endurance and 

quantity of water passed, however, 

t he steamer w as g real ly superi 

the hand engine at d con\ inced 
many of t hose present thai st< am was 
better than muscle for operating 
i i fines, and thai in a shot t time 
en would supersede hand engine a 
as molor-opi ratei i irines are now 
superseding i gim s. The 

I 
.per.. i' d apparatus is a nun 
miliar history. Wil h i he developn 
in engine | bi en the ini- 

pl'.e elllenl Of all 

far lack as 1819, J d & 

Sous, now Jan et Bt»yd & Bro., of 
Philadelphia, were the manufactui 
ulti-ply rubber I ned cotton I 
The firm was then located in Boston, 
and was i he sole agents in New En- 



i for the product of the Eureka horse-drawn ■ lyde 

Fire 1 1 ipany, w Inch is still News 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Patterson Fire Department Reorganized 
The Patterson (Cal.) Irrigator of 
December 21, a bright, newsy little 
weekly, recently launched, under the 
above title, says: 

The volunteer fire department of 
Patterson has been reorganized, and 
steps are now being taken to put it in 
efficient working order. 

A public meeting to consider reor- 
ganization was held last Friday night, 
but because the attendance was rather 
small and also for the reason that 
Chief Shimmin was out of town on 
business, it was decided to postpone 
action and a call was sent out for 
another meeting to be held Monday 
night. Chief Shimmin returned from 
San Francisco on the evening train 
just in time to attend the meeting, and 
there was a fairly good representation 
of property owners present. 

J. M. Kerr was elected chairman for 
the evening, and after the meeting was 
called to order a motion was made and 
carried that the old volunteer organi- 
zation be continued. The constitution 
of the department as adopted some 
months ago was then read. Under 
this constitution the chief has the 
power to appoint all subordinates, and 
Chief Shimmin therefore made the fol- 
lowing appointments: First lieuten- 
ant. H. H. Everett; second, Herman 
Selbach; third. M. E. Ehresman; 
fourth, E. R. Leedy. It was sug- 
gested that committees should be ap- 
pointed to overhaul the fire apparatus, 
to investigate the condition of all hy- 
drants and to prepare marked maps 
showing the locations of all hydrants. 
The following committees were then 
appointed: On Hydrants - Charles 
Rouse, Julian May, J. H. Utz and J. 
H. Durbin. On Apparatus- M. E. 
Ehresman, Guy Brewer, V. E. Brown 
and H. H. Olsen. On Maps-. I. M. 
Kerr and Elwyn Hoffman. Each of 
these committees is to perform its 
work and render a full report at the 
next meeting. 

The matter of fire drill was then 
discussed, and a motion was made 
and carried that a practice drill he 
held every Saturday at 7 a. m., be- 
ginning Saturday, December 30th. 

On motion made and carried the 
time for the next meeting was set at 
7:30 p. m.. December 28th. at Kerr & 



Selbach 's store. The meeting then 
adjourned. 

Fifteen new members signed the 
roll, and the list of members is now 
as follows: P. H. Shimmin, H. H. 
Everett, Herman Selbach, E. R. 
Leedy, V. E. Brown, J. H. Utz, Wm. 
A. Ort, M. E. Ehresman, G. H. Brewer, 
R. C. Shimmin, T. J. May, B. R. 
Bingham, F. S. Harrison, Pete Pad- 
dock, J. M. Kerr, Hurb Sesna, D. Mc- 
Creight, J. G. Hoskins, 0. S. Gilbert, 
Bert Hoskins, Elwyn Hoffman, J. H. 
Durbin, A. Solomon, H. H. Olsen, C. 
E. Matheson, J. E. Rouse, G. L. Fins- 
ter, Chas. Kouse, Victor Slatten. It 
is expected that a number of new 
members will be taken in at the next 
meeting. 



Sprinklers in Factories. 

A writer in McClure's Magazine of 
recent date, under the above heading, 
says: 

"'Sprinklers should be made compul- 
I sory. It is claimed that the first death 
, is yet to be recorded in a sprinklered 
factory; and their value in a hundred 
ways is beyond all question. No man 
can now build atheatre without them; 
and what is enforced by law for places 
of amusement ought to be enforced 
for places where people have to go to 
earn their living. What is more, a 
theatre is three stories high, and a 
loft factory may be ten or fifteen. If 
the manufacturers of certain sprinkler 
systems have formed a combination, 
there are other sprinkler sj stems that 
are not controlled by a combination; 
and nine in all have been tested and 
approved by the National Beard of 
Underwriters. Sprinklers add about 
I four per cent to the cost of a building. 
But they increase the renting value of 
a building, and they so decrease the 
price of insurance as to pay for them- 
selves within five years. When the 
mere raising of the temperature of a 
room to 140 or 150 degrees first sends 
in an automatic alarm, and then turns 
the whole ceiling into a sort of spray 
cascade, that is bound to have its ef- 
fect. The Triangle fire might not 
have been extinguished altogether, 
but it would almost certainly have 
been held in check till the employes 
got out and the firemen arrived." 



Trouble Over Auto Specifications. 

At a meeting of the Oakland City 
Council last Wednesday the Chronicle 
of this city says a lively discussion of 
the matter of specifications for four 
automobiles drawn up by Chief Engi- 
neer N. A. Ball resulted. 

Agent McDonald for the Velie Com- 
pany, whose bid was the lowest re- 
ceived, but was not recommended by 
Ball in his report to the council, hurled 
one straight from the shoulder when 
he said: 

"The specifications used in the ad- 
vertisement for bids on these automo- 
biles for the fire department were 
taken from the back page of a Cadillac 
catalogue." He furthermore stated 
that his bid had come within the spe- 
cifications, yet had not been recom- 
mended. 

Don Lee, agent for the Cadillac 
Company, denied that the specifica- 
tions as drawn up by Ball were re- 
strictive to other makes of cars. 
Frank Fageol, agent for the Rambler 
Company, stated he was the lowest 
bidder and that his bid had come with- 
in the specifications. 

Mayor Mott expressed himself as in 
favor of rejecting all the bids and re- 
advertising, but the matter finally 
went over for another hearing. 

New Chemical a Success. 

The Petaluma Courier says the new 
combination chemical and auto hose 
had its first active duty one day last 
week when called out in response to 
an alarm of fire from the Santa Ro.-a- 
Vallejo tannery shortly before 7 
o'clock. The chemical auto was light- 
ed quickly and left the engine house 
as soon as the alarm let the number 
show. 

The scene of the fire was reachi d 
quickly, the chemical hose was quickly 
laid and the chemical turned on. The 
fire, which was on the roof of the en- 
gine room of the tannery, was quickly 
smothered before any serious damage 
resulted. The tire was out before any 
water reached it. 



Subscribe for the PACIFIC Fireman 



The city of Pasadena has ordered 
one Gorham gasoline pumping engine, 

motor-driven, and one Seagrave. six 
cylinder 80 horse power combination 
chemical engine and hose wagon. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Empress Theatre. 

One of the most attractive programs 
of the season will be the offering for 
the coming week. Heading the list 
will be the Sarnthaller Troupe of 
Tyrolean Serenaders who offer a num- 
ber composed of singing and dancing. 
Next, a pretty little musical offering, 
entitled "Erin's Isle." Mr. Fred W. 
Hoxton presents this charming little 
Irish singing creation. A society 
Texas Tommy Carnival under the di- 
rection of Mr. Frank Hale and Miss 
Marie Tolman, the recognized cham- 
pions of the world. A laughing num- 
ber will be offered by Al and Jack 
Gruet, who give an excellent black- 
face character comedy act. Calvert 
Dean and Leta Price will entertain J 
with their charming college come- 1 
dietta, entitled "A Student's Apart- , 
ments. " W. J. Coleman, the famous 
Irish wit will entertain with a raft of 
new songs and character stories. 
Maklin, Eddy and Nickel, clever acro- 
bats, will offer a comedy acrobatic 
performance. A novelty will be offer- 
ed by The Three Trovello Brothers, 
expert swimmers and divers from 

Australia. 

Alcazar Theatre. 

"The Dawn of To-Morrow,'' which 
is to be presented in the Alcazar next 
Monday evening and throughout the 
week, was dramatized from Mrs. 
Frances Hodgson Burnett's story with 
similar title. By theatre folk it is 
usually alluded to as "the Christian 
Science play," probably because it 
upholds the doctrine upon which that 
religion is based. Assurance is given 
by the Alcazar management that "The 
Dawn of To-Morrow" will be capably 
acted and elaborately staged. There 
are twenty-five speaking characters in 
the cast, with Evelyn Vaughan as 
Clad, Bertram Lytell as Dandy, Louis 
Bennison as Sir Oliver, Will R. Wall- 
ing as his nephew, Charles Ruggles as 
a professional lliicf, Beth Taylor as a 
girl of the slums and the remainder 
of the company appropriately be- 
stowed. In the first act Sir Oliver's 
sumptuous drawing-room is seen, and 
the second picture shows a "peasoup" 
London fog in the heart of a region 
thai history has named "Hell's Hole." 

Glad's garret and an apartment in the 

Temple are also shown. 



o r 



Vo u 



The Globe Turnout Suit was made for yon. Note 
that wide storm collar, those pocket stays and 
lapels, the straps and buckles at the wrist, the 
double shoulders, the double pants seat, the quick 
hitch waist fastening. 

And test that water proof lining. The heaviest 
storm, the deepest smoke will not affect it. 

Fire fighting is not pleasant work. Yet it is a 
relief to know that you are clothed comfortably 
and with the best suit obtainable for the hard work 
you will give it. At the price you cannot afford to 
be without it. 

Suit complete $8.50 

Yttu will find your size in the stock at the 

GORHAM ENGINEERING AND FIRE APPARATUS COMPANY 

48 Fremont St. San Francisco 




American Rubber Mfg. Co, 

9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories— Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 



WE MANUKArTUKE A COMPLETE LINE OF 



Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose. Engine Suction Hose, 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Department Supplies 



Brass 



Eureka Pi re Hose iVlfg. Co. 




WE ARE 



LEADERS 1IN THE MANUFACTl iRI \ 

FIRE DEPARTMENT HOSE 



OF 



EUREKA, PARAGON AND RED CROSS BRANDS 




'PAKAGOIT 




EUREKA FIRE HOSE MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

«o-f><> FREMONT STREET, ^A.N' FRANCISCO 

\v. a. DAOOBTT, ... PaelHc Const Manimr 



P A C 1 F 1 C FIREMAN 





Fireman 



PUHI.ISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 



Editorial Rooms and Business Ollice, 479 Turk Street. 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 



Entered as second-class matter March 21, 1908. at the 
PostoHice at San Francisco, Tat., under the Act of Con- 
mess of March :.. 



SATURDAY JANUARY 6. 1912 

Civil Service Commissioner Frank 
McDonald Tuesday tendered bis re- 
signation to Mayor McCarthy, giving 
as a cause press of other business. 

The need of motor apparatus was 
again the subject of much discussion 
at a recent meeting of the Petaluma 
city council and may soon take action 
on the matter. 



Between 1901 and 1910 it cost every 
man, woman and child in the United 
States and Canada an average or $2.39 
a year for tire. The European was 
paying thirty-three cents; the Ger- 
man, for his part, only nineteen. 

The most efficient of fire depart- 
ments will guarantee to fight fire suc- 
cessfully only to a height of eighty- 
five feet— about that of the seventh 
story— the height to which water 
towers can reach and throw their 
streams. Streams can be thrown much 
higher, but they then have no pene- 
I rating power. As firemen say, they 
merely "hit the windows." 



We congratulate the Board of Fire 
Commissioners on the appointment of 
Dominick R. Conniff as temporary 
secretary. Conniff has filled the office 
of assistant secretary for twelve yi ars 
and is thoroughly familiar with the 
work of the department. It is hoped 
the Board will see their way clear to 
make the appointment permanent. 

The largest city in Germany (Berlin) 
got along with a fire loss of $200,000 
last year. Chicago with the same 
population had fire losses of ?5,000,000, 
and the sum seems ample enough, it 
probably is not a very good year for 
fires in Chicago. The fire fighting 
facilities in Berlin are probably much 
better than in Chicago. They need 



to be. Chicago has the better fire de- 
partment, but has to pay for its main- 
tenance, pay heavier insurance prem- 
iums and on top of these added ex- 
penses, she looses the additional $4,- 

800,000. 

Last week City Attorney Long ad- 
vised the Civil Service Commission 
that section 6 of article 9 of the char- 
ter, limiting the age of members of 
the fire department at the time of their 
appointment to 25 years, does not ap- 
ply to those desiring to take the ex- 
amination for hydrantmen, saying: 
"It would work a great hardship if it 
were to apply to promotions and I be- 
lieve it should not apply to transfers 
from one position to another in the 
same department." 

Under the title, "Auto Apparatus! 
Displacing Horse-drawn Vehicles in' 
Fire Departments, " in last Monday's 
Examiner, Steuart Gayness says:' 
"Commercial trucks are replacing 
horse-drawn vehicles in all lines of in- ; 
dustry. E -pecially in the fire depart- 
ment service are the motor trucks 
proving of great advantage over the 
old method of apparatus. The neces- 
sity of speed and power is greater in 
the fire department work than in any 
other class of service and it is the com- 
bination of these two factors that is 
making great advances for motor 
trucks in the fire departments of all 
the large cities. In no city through- 
out the country is there a greater need 
of motor trucks in the fire department 
than in San 'Francisco, where the hills 
and cobble-stone streets make it dan- 
gerous and in some cases impossible 
for horse-drawn vehicles to traverse." 



San Francisco Fire Commissioners. 



Ivy Inn's Midnight Blaze. 

Wednesday morning, shortly after 
1 o'clock a fire broke out in the one- 
story structure at the corner of Ocean 
boulevard and Balboa street occupied 
by the Ivy Inn. Fanned by an ocean 
breeze the flames rapidly communi- 
cated to the adjoining shacks, occu- 
pied by curio shops, shooting galleries 
and waffle kitchens. By the time the 
firemen arrived on the scene the struc- 
tures were in ashes. The cause of the 
blaze is unknown, but it is believed to 
be due to escaping gas in one of the 
small near-by waffle kitchens. Loss 
estimated at $3000. 



The Board of Fire Commissioners 
met in regular session Thursday, Jan- 
uary 4, 1912 (all members present) 
and transacted business as follows: 

The resignation of Wm. H. McDon- 
nell as secretary to the board was ac- 
cepted. 

Capt. D. R. Conniff was appointed 
secretary vice McDonnell resigned. 

Leave of absence for an indefinate 
period was granted D. R. Conniff. 

Chief Murphy recommended the fol- 
lowing transfers: 

S. Rocca, captain truck 3 to engine 
12; H. Jennings, hoseman fireboat 2 
to engine 17; J. J. Buckley, hoseman 
engine 19 to engine 27; L. F. Mitchell, 
hoseman engine 16 to engine 11; R. 
W. Pritchard, hoseman engine 40 to 
engine 19; E. L. Nelson, hoseman fire- 
boat 2 to engine 42; J. Gannon, truck- 
man truck 3 to engine 34. Approved. 

The following assignments were ap- 
proved: J. McGowan, captain truck 3; 
Henry Reid, lieutenant truck 2, and 
T. J. Bean, hoseman engine 9. 

The application of E. M. Saxon, en- 
gine 21, for six months' leave was 
denied. 

The contract for motor-driven hook 
and ladder truck was awarded to the 
Gorham Engineering and Fire Appa- 
ratus Company. 

The complaint against H. Casey, 
truck 6, was heard and he was de- 
prived of pay during suspension. 

John Haley, temporary truckman, 
failed to appear to answer to com- 
plaint and was ordered dismissed from 
the department. 

The following names were ordered 
placed upon the list of substitutes: 
Wm. Madison, Ed. Gallatin, F. Burke, 
W. T. Smith, H. Frohman, J. Hen- 
nessy, F. Schmitz, W. D. Griffin. 

P. Wralty, captain chemical 7, Geo. 
Hartman, lieutenant truck 1, R. W. 
Pritchard, engine 40, and A. A. Mor- 
rissey. engine 15, were commended 
for responding to alarms while off 
duty. 

The civil service commission certi- 
fied as captain, J. J. Kenney; as lieu- 
tenants, C. W. Heggum and P. J. 
Creede; as hostlers, Gustave Rapp, 
Geo. W. Miller, Pat O'Connell, Jas. J. 
Bunner, G. T. Rapp, Jr., Andrew 
Bahrs, H. J. Peterson and P. Whelan. 

The application of Pat O'Connell, 
hostler, for leave of absence for five 
months was granted. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Reminiscences of the Los Angeles Fire 
Department. 

BY PERCY "KID" WILLIAMS. 

Isn't it singular how people meet with one 
another and under such peculiar circumstan- 
ces. It all came about in this manner. We 
happened to meet and make the acquaintance 
of an ex-fireman of the -Los Angeles fire de- 
partment whom we afterwards found to be no 
other than Percy "Kid" Williams, formerly 
of engine company 11 of Los Angeles. 

We were standing the other night on Mark- 
et street waiting for a car when the clanging 
of bells and the tooting of whistles gave 
warning that the department had been called 
out to answer an alarm somewhere down the 
street, and as the hose wagon dashed by, fol- 
lowed by the engine, we remarked to our 
friend that we ha4 the greatest fire de- 
partment in the country. We watched with 
eager eyes the apparatus dash down the 
street, and also half-earnestly waited for an 
answer to our question from our friend who 
happened to be standing with us at the time. 

"Yes," he answered, "those boys can go 
some, and from what I've seen of them they 
seem to understand their business in getting 
to the box and getting a stream on the blaze; 
but say, old man," he continued, "they have 
nothing on the department I was in some 
years ago. I think without exaggeration. 
some three or four years back we had 
the best and quickest department in the 
country." 

Hearing him make this statement our in- 
terest was aroused and we turned to him, and 
in a haif-uninterested manner, asked what 
department that was that had such a re- 
markable reputation in getting tj the scene 
of action so quickly, and when he told us Los 
Angeles, we asked that he explain. 

"Yes," he continued, "engine company 11 
could get the tap.- hook off and out of the 
house before the second round started coming 
in. and every man was right there on the job; 
and furthermore every one of us knew our 
business. There was no hustling to know 
when- you belonged and what was expected 
of you. We all knew. 

"Old Capt. McDonald, a man I hat had seen 
twenty years of service, had us trained like 
acrobats on the stage; we knew him and he 
us; we relied on him and he counted on US. 
With Buddy Nodleman driving thewagonwe, 
that rode behind him, fell in our hearts we 
were safe, a feeling thai nut every hoseman 
has not gol way down in his heart id' the man 
handling Ha- reins. Sometimes, in winter, 
when the streets were slippery and the horses 

freshly shod, we used to tumble, hut il 

things were straightened oul in a jiffy and we 
win-.- on our «ay. Burr and Bustillos used in 
rid" behind with me, and no better or braver 
boys ever lived than these two I think they 
are both policemen down there now, so you 
c in lee they musl have been "the goods" or 
thejjitj of the angels would nol have made 
i In m protectors of tin- town. R.\ an used to 
handle i h" r ins mi t he engine and Tom Hal 
field was our engineer, old Tom could gel 



her steaming — a big Metropolitan — in three 
or four minutes; he had a knack of handling 
that engine that no other man in the depart- 
ment could duplicate. He knew everv part 
of her by heart; in fact I think his whole life 
was wrapped up in that steamer; he used to 
talk about her at night in the dormitory 
when we were sleeping, and many a good old 
josh he got for his unconscious remarks. 
Bustillos was the life of our company and 
when not at work in the house I think we all 
lived like one family. 

"Captain Mcdonald was a big-souled, kind- 
hearted, sympathetic man and a fire-fighter 
from the very start; everything was work 
and discipline with him at a blaze, but outside 
of fighting fire and our house work he was 
one of the grandest men that ever lived — 
good to everyone and showed no partiality to 
anyone. He was one man outside of Lips 
that should have been chief of the Los Ange- 
les fire department." 

After the "Kid" had stopped to light a 
cigarette for a moment we paused to ask what 
was the trouble why Walter Lips did not hold 
out longer down there, after telling him that 
we thought Lips was always spoken of in such 
great admiration by everyone. 

"Well," he answered, "you know what 
politics are, don't you? "and when we answered 
in the affirmative, he continued; "There was 
and never will be a better and greater chief 
in all the history that Los Angeles made for 
itself in its fire department than Lips. He 
was one man that made Ihe Los Angeles lire 
department; he built all the houses they have 
got, put the water tower into commission, 
and made battalion chiefs, captains and lieu- 
tenants out of men that would have never 
been anything else than hosemen if they lived 
a thousand years. Why, he did everything 
for the department of Los Angeles, even put 
the automobile for the chief to ride around in 
in commission. He started a fire alarm sys- 
tem down there that can't be beat; got the 
hoys four days a month off and raised their 
salary; and after he had accomplished a 
thousand other good things to benefit the de- 
partment and had given the best part of his 
life to the protection of the property of Los 
Angeles and also to its citizens, the new ad- 
ministration, under Uncle Alexander, deemt d 
him unfit for the position and brought 
charges against him. That, in my opinion, 
was the "bunk," But thai didn't dim the 
feelings id' love and admiration thai was in 
the hearts of Ins men whin In- lefl them. 
One big loving cup, a diamond ring thai 
Mashes on his finger, and a life's membi r hip 
in the Firemen's Protective Association, am 
only a few of i he little things i hal men r ive 
i o ..in' another to show their l<>\ i . i e peel 
and Mi" feeling of admiration that men have 

for a g I. i rim, i incere, fail h Ful leader, " 

| '/',. /., continued n*a t week.] 

Seattle Fire News. 

i i ■ ii " ■ 

Tlir honorable retiremenl for age of 
(iariltiiT Ki'llnpt':. fire marshal of Seat- 
tle, which was provided lor last Au- 



gust, took effect at the close of the 
year. Mr. Kellogg fought fires in 
Chicago over fifty years ago and came 
to what is now the metropolis of Wash- 
ington in 1864. He was Seattle's first 
chief in both the volunteer and paid 
departments and has been marshal 
over ten years. He is known all over 
the coast as an active worker for effi- 
cient fire service, which makes it un- 
necessary to say that he has more 
than once been the victim of politics. 
Seattle's mayor has just tendered 
the marshalship to ex-Chief Bring- 
hurst, for the reason that a new fire 
protection ordinance has been passed 
and an expert is wanted to start new 
systems and methods. If Mr. Bring- 
hurst accepts it will be not onlv be- 
cause of his interest in the new ordi- 
nance, but because the appointment is 
a vendication. It will be remembered 
that although under civil service, he 
was summarily removed in 1910 on a 
change of administration, without any 
charge of incompetency or dishonesty 
or even working politics, and on ap- 
pealing in order to get a chance to re- 
sign, the civil service commission 
found him guilty of protesting too 
much against interference with his 
department and of not answering two 
letters, and sustained the discharge. 
That mayor was recalled the next 
year, but when the present mayor at- 
tempted to reinstate Mr. Bringhurst, 
the same commission refused and de- 
clared that having been once removed 
"for cause" he could never be taken 
back. 

Around Oakland Fire Houses. 

.1. Brown of engine 11 took a trip to 
San Francisco hist week and all his 
friends congratulated him on his good 

looks. 

.lini Boll of engine 1 is said to Wo an 
artist al the wheel of the now auto 

huso wagon. Ho is now buying drugs 
at the Owl drug store in the hopes 
thai he will gel the winning number 
ami have a machine of Ins own. 

Relief Driever Jack Gleason is get- 
t ing to be an apl student of geoli 
llr is now experimenting with coal. 

Milton Sheldon is netting to be a 
fiend al pool. He says it costs money 
in learn to be an expert. 

.1. King "( chemical 2 of Melrose 
has a moving picture singing voice. 
Winn ho begins to sing you ran see 
i lio neighbors mi il on i he front 

slops. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 2>nd and Douglass Sts. 

JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...PLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and Howei ing plants in vai iel y. 
Special attention giv* n to Wedding <i->-t Funeral Orders. 

Arti tie i > oii md Di 

Gardi n ing. Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Rkach Ni Rsekibs, taki Casti-o street coi lo 2Srd, oi 

Mission, 24tfa street and Hoffman avenue car 

Lo 1 toufflaas and 24th ■ 



EAGLESON & CO. 

1158 MARKET ST. 

PHON1- MARKET S4I7 

MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS 
AND SHIRTS 

Guaranteed Navy Flannel Firemen's 
Shirts 

alto I 12 South Spring Slr«*l. I c* Angelrt 



Little Flings. 

One day Pat observed a highly per- 
fumed society lady walking along the 
street leading a pet dog. Pat became 
interested in the dog and, not know- 
ing the ethics of high society, had the 
impudence to ask: 

''What koind av a dog is that?" 

The lady looked haughtily at him a 
moment and then sneered: 

"It's a cross between an Irishman 
ami a skunk." 

"Begory, thin, he's related to both 
av us, ain't he." retorted Pat with a 
grin as he past on. 

"Wlin is running this newspaper, 
anyway?" asked the excited editor of 
tlic common citizen who dropped in 
to ask for a correction. "If you will 
let me look over your list of advertis- 
ers I might tell you. if you arc so cu- 
rious to know," replied the common 
citizen withjusl the faintest suspicion 
of sarcasm in his voice. 



Howard Watches 



SOLD TOR CASH OR ON INSTAI.LME.N I S 



XKThf-n the U.S. Battleship 'Maine" was sunk in Havana 
vv Harbor, Admiral HOWARD W.iieh went 

down with it. 

H lay in sea water f<-i five days waa recovered by a 
.■•i -and to-day it van U than ten second* a 
■. ii icii is h ratio i d in 2G0 000. Admiral 

Shtabee has carried his HOWARD Watch sine | Jfi 

It has cruised in eighteen iressvla of the U, S Navy 
over a distance ot two hnndredand eiphty-eifiht thousand 
miles 

li has set the wtandard time\r\ taking observations for 
tins where a f< w seconds* error may spell di 
to the ship A aervici n« th,.t even the ship's 

ihronomeurs have to in- < hecked up in eveiy port 

always worth what you pay 



A- OORVI 



Phr.net Market 3285 



A HOWARD Watch 
for it. 

The price <-f each HOWARD IS fixed at the factory and 
a printed ticket attached from the 17-jewell idoubU 
rotter escapement) in a ' Jas Boss" or "Crescent" sold- 

i filled case at £40, i»> th<- . -jewell in a L4K solid gold east) 

I at Slf.0. 

Not every jewelei can sell :."u a HnWAUD Watch. 
Tind the HOWARD jeweler in jour town and talk to 
; him. He is a good man bi kBOW. 

T. H. KILOO 
diamonds and jewelry 
71 wai ler st . san francisco 



HnmtMI6l8 



UNION FLORIST 

Formerly of 25 Fourth Slreei 

3017 SIXTEENTH STREET 



Funeral Work a Specially at 
Lowest Prices 



Order* Promptly Attended to 



Gold and Silver Trimmings. All Kindsof Gold Embroider- 
ing D.Tie to Order. 

Tetepfums Dot 

BLOOM BROS. Inc. 

hat a ink cap ractowy 

-Military and Na,y Cap; a Sjpeciall 
109 NEW M0NTG0NERY ST.. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 

FIREMEN EAT AT IHK 

...B. «&. I). RESTAURANT. 

Where yon get the l^-.st for the least money. 

M. O. DAI.BEY, Mer. 
178 THIRD ST., Shu Francisco 
OPEN TILL MIDNIGHT. 



READERS 

FIND WHAT THEY WANT 

IN THE BOOK LINE 

AT THE 

BOOK OMNORIUM 

WILLIAM McDEVITT, Manager 

1004 FILLMORE STREET 

Neat McAllister 



t5,000 MAGAZINES OF M.L SORTS 
20,000 VOLUMES NEW WD OL/>i 

The Book Omnorium Buys Old Books." 

We Sell, Rent. Exchange 
Books rented 5c a week 



I elephooe Douglas 287 I 



Hm» C W2 



Phone Douglas SMI 



WM. R. EGAN 

M. K. < 

VETERINARY SURGEOM III S. F. F. II. 

1155 Cioi III \ OA II \\ 1: 
1 ■■■■■' » Park !I7;„„I na s,„ Pram >■ 



WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 



WARRANT BROKI RS 



630 KliARNY STREET 



M I Mil COVICH. Pa* 

Martin's Restaurant and Grill 

1533 STEJNER STREET 

Nr " G| -«™ Saa I ...no.,-,. 



COR t iMMI R< I \l 



SAN FRANCISCO 



FINE JOB PRINTING 



THE PACIFIC FIREMAN, 470 lurk Street 



The Little Emporium 

L. RIZNIC P.opnelor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

i WDERWEAR A SPI ■ IM.l 1 
220o OS GEARY STREET 

Near B.odVri.k 

Trlrnhonr Wert 4824 SAN I K VNl 



SALVAR 

I I Will Ssvei 

The Greatest BLOOD REMEDY in the W* rid 

M II i I URE 

RHEUMATISM 

Acute or Chi 

BLOOD POISON 

Acquired or Hereditary 

PARALYSIS 
CATARRH 
MALARIA 

Diseases of Liver, Kidneys and Bladder 

Diseases Peculiar lo Women 

$10.00 FOR 40 TO lO DAYS' TREATMENT 

Call or Write for our 100 Page Boi kit t 

TO THE PUB LIC 

In offering Salvar to the public, we do so 
with perfect confidence, and slate publicly i Lr 
willingness to have our remedy thorout hly tested 
in any fair and equilable n anner. in the treat- 
ment of all diseases we claim it will telieve. and 
we will abide by a decision so given and dis- 
continue its sale at once if it is found differerl in 
any particular from v hat it is represented to be. 

SEITZ & MILLS, Agents 
140> Market St., near 10th, San Francisco 




VOL. IX.-NO. 3. 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 cents. 



Pasadena Fire News. 

On the night of December 20, 1911, 
F. G. Thamer of engine company 2 
lost his hold on the pole while coming 
down to his horses when a stray tap 
came in, and fractured a bone in one 
heel and sprained the other ankle, and 
up to the present time has been con- 
fined to his bed, not being able to 
walk. 

Mr. J. Hammond of engine compa- 
ny 1 is on the road to prosperity and 
good heallh. He has been ill for some 
time. 

Plans for an addition to the Mentor 
avenue engine house were ordered 
drawn by the city commissioners last 
week, and the board appointed Archi- 
tect C. F. Driscoll for the purpose. 
He submitted to the commissioners 
tentative plans which Mrs. Hertel, 
Eliot and Mr. McCament and Mayor 
Tlium went over quite thoroughly. 
They suggested a number of altera- 
tions which the architect will make. 

An Associated Press dispatch of 
Jan. 13 says: The Pasadena Hotel on 
Fair Oaks avenue, formerly the lead- 
ing hotel of the city, caught fire Sat- 
urday night and the entire building 
was destroyed. 

There were 100 guests in the hotel 
when the fire was discovered, and it 
is believed ail have escaped, although 

with the less of their. personal effects. 
Attempts In save any part of Ihe 
hotel was given up, and the efforts of 
the lire department was concentrated 
"ii preventing the fire from spreading. 
The whole building, which occupies 
an entire black, was in flames, but 

there was little danger of a disastrous 



conflagration owing to the lack of 
wind. 

Manager Wilson says all of the 
guests escaped. They include many 
wealthy easterners. The loss may 
reach $250,000. 



Chief Walsh's Body Rescued. 

From a New York dispatch, under 
date of Jan. 13, we take the following: 

"In the shadow of weakening walls 
that threatened each moment to totter 
and fall, a squad of firemen worked 
for five hours this afternoon to wrest 
from the ruins of the Equitable build- 
ing the body of Battalion Chief Wm. 
Walsh, who met death in the fire of 
last Tuesday. They found him shortly 
afternoon, half sitting, half reclining, 
with outstretched arms, pinned face 
down by a giant iron beam, and with 
only his rubber coat showing. It was 
dark when they lifted the body. 

The coroner's physician believed 
that the chief had been asphyxiated 
as he groped through the burning 
building, and that the debris which 
fell upon him crushed an already life- 
less body." 

Hose Company No. 4 of Hayward 
Park took possession of its new build- 
ing Sunday, Jan. 5, the formality of 
handing over the keys being under- 
taken by Chief Bartlett. The follow 
ing officers were elected: W. E. Bain, 
foreman; F. W. Bain, assistant: II. 
Fair, secretary; A. Berham, delegate, 

San Mateo Times. 

Santa Cruz is advertising for a mo- 
tor-propelled combination chemical 

ami hose wagon. 



Test of Motor- Driven Chemical Engine. 

Last Saturday afternoon. Jan. 13, 
one of the recently purchased Ameri- 
can-La France motor-driven fire en- 
gines was tested in the presence of 
Mayor Rolph, the Fire Commissioners, 
Chief Murphy and a large gathering 
of interested spectators. 

With a running start the chemical, 
loaded with six men, made the distance 
on California from Montgomery street 
to Powell in one minute and thirty 
seconds, this including the time of a 
stop made on the steep hillside be- 
tween Grant avenue and Stockton 
street. It was a requirement of the 
test that such a stop should be made 
in order that the ability of the engine 
to start again under such unfavorable 
conditions might be shown. 

A second run, though this was not 
counted as an official test, was made 
up the hill from Battery to Powell, the 
time in this case being one minute 
forty and one-half seconds. 

Then the engine, accompanied by 
the fire commissioners in automobiles, 
went out to Van Ness avenue, where 
it was run back and forth for fifteen 
minutes to test its ability to make the 
required "endurance speed" of fo 
miles an hour. The result showed that 
the apparatus had travel* d at I lie rate 
of fifty-One miles an hour. 

The Fire Commission recently pur- 
chased i hne motor-driven chemical 
engines of the same I \ peas that tested 

Saturday, which is the only on< 

received from the east. 

It was the unanimous opinion of 
those interested in motor lire appara- 
tus that the test was highly salis- 

factory. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Supply and Demand. 

Throughout the plague-ridden parts 
of China there are thousands of China- 
men lying dead in the streets and 
country lanes. To the dead head of 
every one of them there was attached 
when he fell a long queue. The queue 
consists of hair. Throughout the civi- 
lized world there is a great demand 
for hair, especially human hair. 

Cable dispatches state that a New 
York hair syndicate is so busy at work 
in the plague regions that the queue 
is torn from the head of dead men be- 
fore their bodies are cold. The queues 
are shipped to New York, made into 
"switches," wigs, etc., and thus con- 
verted into money. 

Timid persons will say that this is a 
good way to spread the plague among 
the people of the earth. But that is 
only a detail. The New York syndi- 
cate is simply catering to the law of 
supply and demand. People demand 
wigs and there lie the dead Chinamen 
to supply them. 

If you have money and a bald head 
you can donate something to the Red 
Cross Society to help fight the plague 
and then buy a nice new wig and help 
spread the plague. 



his coat on. After the door had closed 
the old gentleman turned to the girl. 
"What's the matter with that fire- 
man fellow?" he asked. "My watch 
ran down this afternoon, and I wanted 
him to tell me the time, so that I could 
set it." 



Point Richmond Fire News. 



Conscience Makes Cowards. 

A quiet, bashful sort of a young 
fireman was jnaking a call on a Chicago 
girl one evening not so very long ago, 
when her father came into the parlor 
with his watch in his hand. It was 
about 9:30 o'clock. At the moment 
the young man was standing on a 
chair straightening a picture over the 
piano. The girl had asked him to fix 
it. As he turned, the old gentleman, 
a gruff, stout fellow, said: 

"Young man do you know what 
time it is?" 

The bashful youth got off the chair 
nervously. 

"Yes, sir," he replied, "I was just 
going." 

He went into the hall without any 
delay and took his hat and coat. The 
girl's father followed him. As the 
caller reached for the doorknob, the 
old gentleman again asked him if he 
knew what time it was. 

"Yes, sir," was the youth's reply. 
"Good night!'' 

And he left without waiting to put 



Richmond is keeping in step with its 
growth by providing proper fire pro- 
tection. A new eighty-horse power 
motor fire truck has been purchased 
and it is to be stationed at engine 
house 1 on the west side of the city. 
It is to be fully equipped with hose, 
ladders and other apparatus and will 
cost nearly $7,000. 

Richmond had a disastrous fire last 
Wednesday morning. A grist mill 
took fire from an electric wire, and 
while the firemen responded promptly 
and were on the job three minutes 
after the alarm had been turned in, 
j they were powerless to cope with the 
situation owing to the fact that no 
hydrant was at hand. The loss is 
$50,000 and insured for $12,000. 

Engine 2 is located in Richmond 
proper and has 34 volunteers and one 
paid fireman. This is the main com- 
pany of Richmond proper and is com- 
posed mostly of business men. Mr. 
McMullen is one of the prime movers 
of this company and is always on the 
job when the alarm sounds. 

Councilman Ed. McDufF, who is a 
member of company 1. is quite an 
angler. 



Fire-Police Relay Race. 

The firemen-police relay race on the 
evening of Jan. 26, when the Y. M. C. 
A. will hold an indoor meet, is causing 
much speculation among the "finest" 
and "bravest." The firemen team 
will be picked from Kearny, Cotter. 
Lutdredge, Quinn and Kelly, and the 
police have such fast runners as Bird- 
sail, Brechia, Bierman, Munn, Pen- 
gaily and Coates entered. 



That the headquarters of the fire 
department, police department and 
offices of the board of supervisors will 
be moved before March 1 from 64 Eddy 
street to the new Hall of Justice on 
Kearny street, opposite Portsmouth 
square, was the announcement of Su- 
pervisor McLaran of the public build- 
ings committee last week. 



The Oakland Fire Department Re- 
lief Fund Association will hold an 
election for seven members of the 
Board of Directors for the ensuing 
year, January 29, 1912. 



The San Francisco correspondent of 
the Fresno Mirror says: "Every once 
in a while instance crop up of a real 
mean man. Mrs. V. G. Daggitr of 
600 Sixth street told the police that 
her landlord had taken her gas stove 
because she owed him a few dollars 
for rent. Her husband is in the city 
prison, but the landlord is a free 
man." 



Subscribe for the Pacific Fireman 



Improvements. 



[Pacific Municipalities.] 

Stockton has purchased a lot of ad- 
ditional fire hose. 

Santa Monica is installing addition- 
al fire fighting apparatus. 

Sonoma is about to purchase 700 feet 
of fire hose and a hose cart. 

Eureka councilmen have decided to 
purchasp a chemical fire engine. 

Newman citizens are raising funds 
for the purchase of additional fire ap- 
paratus. 

Lodi citizens are thinking of ex- 
pending about $4,000 for fire depart- 
ment apparatus. 

Oroville trustees are discussing pro- 
posed improvements to the fire fight- 
ing equipment, 



National Guard and Society Uniform! a SpecU'ty 

CALIFORNIA UNIFORM 

AND — 

TAILORING COMPANY 

MARCUS LAFKE. Prop. 
WE MAKE SUITS TO ORDER FROM S30 UP 

287 OFARRELL ST. Bel. Pcwell and M.™ 



™ | Dousla. 3770 
phon " i Home C 3770 



?an Francuco. Cll. 



Phone Home C 2458 



Lamanet Bros. 

Is the place of all plates to gel ihe 
very latest and best in the way of 

FIREMEN, S REGULATION SHIRTS 
FIREMEN'S TURNOUT SUITS 
GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS 
HATS & UNDERWEAR, ETC. 

524 BROADWAY STREET 

SAIN PRANCISCO 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Empress Theatre. 

Commencing with the performance 
Sunday afternoon, there will be a 
show at the Empress, which the man- 
agement guarantees to meet the de- 
mands of the most exacting in vaude- 
ville. Heading the new program will 
be Mr. and Mrs. Mark Murphy, in a 
revival of "Clancy's Ghost," which 
was a scream in the '80s. Walten and 
Lester will show how the best tricks 
of magic can be bungled when in the 
hands of comedians. The "big 
smoke" Ned (Cork) Norton, the mer- 
ry minstrel man, will be heard in 
stories and songs. Eccentric instru- 
mentalities from Europe are the Fer- 
nandez May Duo. The voice of Miss 
Fernandez has a range of four octaves. 
Another finished singer is R. R. Ray- 
mouth, who possesses the gift of three 
distinct voices, soprano, tenor and ba- 
ritone. Marie Fitzgibbon, is a come- 
dienne who has a repertoire of spright- 
ly songs and characterizations. The 
Transcontinental Four, musical and 
instrumental artists of fame will be 
an added attraction. The motion pic- 
tures will complete the bill. 

Alcazar Theatre. 

Another week of "Forty-five Min- 
utes From Broadway" will commence 
next Monday evening at the Alcazar. 
The success of this merry musical play 
was instantaneous and emphatic, and 
before the second performance con- 
cluded it was decided by the manage- 
ment to extend its stay on the stage. 
It is safe to assert that no other stock 
dramatic company in America could 
step into a musical production with 
the facility displayed by the Alcazar 
players. Indeed the critics have united 
in declaring that very few of the mu- 
sical comedy organizations that have 
visited here this season excelled in 
either acting or vocalism the interpre- 
ters of "Forty-Five Minutes From 
Broadway." Among the features that 
compel plaudits are Evelyn Vaughan's 
singing of "Mary's a Grand Old 
Name" and "So Long, Mary," Ber 
tram Lytell's dancing of "Texas 
Tommy," Charles Rtiggles' warbling 
of "1 Want to be a Popular Million- 
aire" and his duet with Beth Taylor, 
"Mr. Moon Man." The chorus, ' too, 
comes in for merited encomiums. It 
is announced that the coming week 
will positively lie the final one of 
"Forty-Five Minnies From Broadway" 
at the O'Farrell-streel play-house. 



Where Gorham Auto Fire Engines are Made . 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 




GORHAM ENGINEERING AND FIRE APPARATUS CO. 



SEATTLE 
216 Jackson Slreet 



SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Street 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 S. Olive Street 



American Rubber Mfg. Co, 

9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories — Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 



WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 

Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose, Brass 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Depart m< ui Supplies 

Eureka Fire Hose AAfg. Co. 




WE ARE LEADERS IIN THE MANUFACTURE OP 

FIRE DEPARTMENT HOSE 



EUREKA, PARAGON AND RED CROSS BRANDS 




EUREKA FIRE HOSE MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

S0>60 FREMONT STREET, «Arv RRAINGISCO 

w. ,\. OAQQBTT, - - - Pacific Coast Mantnr 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 




PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 



Editorial Rooms and Business Office, 1711 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 1,867. 



Entered as second-class matter March 21. 190S. at the 
Pm loilice at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 



SATURDAY JANUARY - 20. 1912 



Walter Lips, former chief of the Los An- 
geles Fire Department, it is reported, was 
slated to again head that department, if Job 
Harriman, the Socialist-Union Labor candi- 
date, had been elected mayor at the recent 
election in that city. 

No doubt there are a few veterans among 
the exempt firemen of this city who remem- 
bers Frederick Kraus who died in this city 
last Sunday. In the early days of '51 Kraus 
was a leading member of Empire Fire En- 
gine Company, the banner volunteer fire 
company of that day. 

The men of this department are elated over 
the arrival of the new American-La France 
auto chemical fire engine which was tested 
last Saturday and met all the requirements. 
The speed, working of the motors, ability of 
climbing hills and the facility of starling 
were thoroughly demonstrated to the satis- 
faction of those present. 



mayor manages to exist on $4,500. At a re- 
cent meeting they fought among themselves 
over the matter of discontinuing the Bell 
street fire station on account of lack of funds, 
which will dispense with the service of four 
men and four horses. He also states there is 
a fine Seagrave truck out of service at the 
Highland avenue station, a penny wise and 
pound foolish trick of course, but that is the 
way in many of the towns in the south, until 
they get a good big fire, which will make 
them sit up and take notice. 

Provision for Aged Veterans. 



It is reported that the Seagrave people 
have sold over fifty-one auto fire machines on 
the Pacific Coast, which is more than all the 
other makes throughout thecountry. In sell- 
ing machines to the large as well as the small 
cities, one of the first problems encountered 
is the money already tied up in the horse- 
drawn wagons. An administration hesilates 
discarding these old wagons and spending 
such large sums for new ones. It is said the 
Seagrave Company have perfected a scheme 
which will enable cities to use their old 
wagons. The front wheels are removed and 
an engine with a sub-frame built in. A new 
rear axle with the necessary driving machi- 
nery is installed, tires are put on the old 
wheels and the horse-drawn fire wagons be- 
come motor-driven vehicles. 



A Montgomery, Ala., correspondent writes 
us that the Birmingham (Ala.) Fire Depart- 
ment has fourteen auto fire engines and have 
ordered six more Seagrave auto combination 
chemicals. Montgomery (Ala.) has two fine 
American-La France 80 horse power combi- 
nation hose and chemical autos, and the way 
they climb the hills and cover the city, he 
states, is out of sight, compared with horse 
drawn apparatus. He also states that Mont- 
gomery has adopted the commission form of 
government and there are four commissioners 
receiving $3,000 each per annum, while the 



Among items of news interesting to the 
men in the fire department, we read that an 
appeal had been made by members of the de- 
partment some two weeks ago for funds with 
which to provide a fitting burial for former 
City Architect O'Connor, who died at the age 
of 82 at the Relief Home. 

The incident emphasizes once again the in- 
security of support (Mr. O'Connor was re- 
puted a wealthy man in former days) that 
menaces the public servants of municipal 
corporations. In the interest of the more 
unfortunate ones whom disaster dogs in their 
declining days, provision for insuring the 
veteran employes of the fire department and 
other departments of public employ, should 
be established. In older communities where 

| the lessons of experience have engraved 
themselves upon the actions of the people, 
provision is made against this menace of pau- 
perism in old age, and the possibility of the 

[Potter's Field; and it is time that we in San 
Francisco were more alive to the need of 
such a course of conduct. The men of the 
fire department are noted for generosity in 
their response to such appeals as the one in 
the case of the late ex-City Architect O'Con- 
nor; and their generosity tends to emphasize 
the importance of looking to the needs of old 

; workers who have given their useful service 

j in the days of their prime, and then find 
themselves threatened with penury and desti- 

' tution in the very community which they have 

I served long and faithfully 

Until men as social groups in cities and 
states come to exercise the same wise and 
clement foresight in respect to the dependent 
members of the community, as men usually 
aim to do in the case of the dependent mem 
hers of their own family, we shall not have 
reached a high degree of social maturity and 
strength. 

Among those who liberally responded were 
engine companies 23. 20, 8 and 41 and others. 
The donations were received by Lieut. Butt 
of engine 8. 

Engineer Tin-nan of tire boat 1 saved the 
life of James McMahan, a sailor, lodging at 
the Sailors' home, Wednesday morning when 
he fell into the bay off the Harrison street 
wharf. 

McMahan was walking along a stringer 
and tripped on a protruding bolt. He was 
sinking for the second time when the engi- 
... i went to his rescue with a life line, las- 
soing thedrowning man and dragging him to 
safety. He was assisted by Lieut. Frank 

! Miskel and Hoseman Frank Kenny. 



Reminiscences of the Los Angeles Fire 
Department. 

BY PERCY "KID" WILLIAMS. 

At that time Steve was captain and Healy 
and I were plain hosemen. After our arrival 
at our destination the papers announced that 
several Los Angeles firemen had come to 
town to inspect possible fire horses and to 
look the stock over, which by the way was 
the truth, as Lips intended purchasing about 
20 head for the department. Naturally, the 
next morning we visited different engine 
companies in the town and expressed our 
astonishment at them having such a well re- 
gulated and equipped department. Healy 
gave the reporters the dope that Captain 
Williams and the chief had came expressly 
from Los Angeles to look things over in the 
horse line and had brought a stableman by 
the name of Quirello to pass his opinion on 
the stock. Of course the papers had big 
headlines, and printed everything of praise 
we had to say and our comments on their de- 
partment and also our own opinions, individ- 
ually, on the town, etc.; but they never men- 
tioned anything about Steve, only that he 
was a stableman, and we had brought him 

j along to keep us company. He never could 
figure out how it was that Lips and I were 
mentioned and not a w r ord about him; but, by 
the way he looked at Healy and myself, it 
sometimes makes me think he knew as well as 
the rest of us why he didn't get the boost he 
should have got. But with all due respect to 
him, I think he is one of the best judges of 
horseflesh and firefighters in the country. A 
good big square honest fellow and well liked 
by all who happen to know him. He also 
would look good in brass buttons, with the 
word chief on his cap. But then he is too 
good a man to lose as a captain, and in one 
way it is just as well that he keep on handl- 
ing pugilists as it would be for him to have 

i charge of the fire department. Just think of 
the meal tickets he would have to hand them — 
about 250. 

I suppose my old friend Buck Hatfield is 
still in the department. Buck and I used to 
try and see who could create more distur- 
bance with the commissioners than anyone 
else in the department. He used to be up 
before them all the time, for some trifling 

i offense committed around the house, but 
somehow or another he always got off with a 
reprimand. He's young yet and who knows 
but some day he may also have a chanc 
become great and glorious; a good worker, 
when he works, but then he didn't take work- 
ing spells often enough to suit some of his 
superiors. 

[To I" ... ../ week.'} 

George Woods, a pensioner of this depart- 
ment, is now residing in Alameda. When- 
ever he has occasion to visit the city he never 
fails to call on his many friends in the ser- 
vice. In visiting Capt. Ellenberg this week 
he subscribed for the Pacific Fireman. 



If we please others, why not you? 
O'Connor, the Florist, 275o Mission street. 
Phone Mission 5088. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



San Francisco Fire Commissioners. 



At the regular meeting of the Board of 
Fire Commissioners held Thursday, January 
18, 1912 (all members being present) the fol- 
lowing business was transacted: 

The following communications were receiv- 
ed from Chief Murphy: 

Submitting complaints against members 
for violations of the rules, as follows: 

Herbert Jennings, hoseman engine 17, for 
disobedience of orders of his superior officer 
on January 14. Charges filed. 

D. O'Dell, temporary hoseman engine 28, 
for refusing to obey an order of his superior 
officer on January 16. Dismissed from the 
department. 

Recommending the following applications 
for transfers be granted: 

F. McCluskey, from lieutenant truck 7 to 
truck 12; Chas. Vocke, from driver engine 6 
to driver truck 12; Wm. Nichols, from tiller- 
man truck 7 to truck 12; Chas. Tyson, from 
truckman truck 6 to truck 12; Leo Castillo, 
from truckman truck 6 to truck 12; F. Lot- 
tritz, from truckman truck 7 to truck 12; 
Wm. Mathison, from hoseman engine 35 to 
engine 6; W. H. Bohen, from hoseman engine 
21 to truckman truck 6; Frank Powers, from 
hoseman engine 6 to engine 13; J. F. Dalv, 
from hoseman engine 30 to engine 15; F. L. 
Smith, from lieutenant relief engine 2 to 
truck 2; Henry Reade, from lieutenant truck 
2 to engine 19. Approved. 

Reporting having made the following as- 
signments of members recently promoted: 

John J. Kenny to captain truck 12; Charles 
Heggum to lieutenant truck 7. Approved. 

Reporting having made the following as- 
signments of temporary firemen: 

Jas. McCarthy to engine 35 as hoseman; A. 
Saunders to engine 19 as hoseman; W. A. 
Kiugsford to engine 21 as hoseman; William 
Armstrong to truck 6 as truckman; William 
Lynch to truck 7 as truckman; J. Hughes to 
engine6 ashoseman; William Meyers to truck 
7 as truckman; T. Collins to truck 12 as truck- 
man; James Muldoon to truck 12 as truckman; 
James J. Norton to truck 12 as truckman; 
Edward Siewert to truck 12 as truckman; 
George SchaefTer to truck !2 as truckman. 
Approved. 

Reporting having assigned John Cahill, 
driver engine 26, who has been temporarily 
detailed as cistern inspector, back to his re- 
gular position in the department. Approved. 

Recommending that the Department of 
Electricity he requested to install the follow- 
ing lire alarm boxes: 

Box 372, Geary and Jones streets; box 585, 
Golden (late avenue and Webster street; box 
889, I'Vltnn and Madison si nets. Approved. 

Recommending that the Hoard of Public 
Works be urged to take immediate stops for 
the erection of the lire house on Stockton 
street near Greenwich and the veterinary 
hospital at the department Btables. Ap- 
proved. 

Recommending that application be made i" 
the Board o£ state Harbor Commissioners 
for reservation at pier 28 of the Beawall as a 
berth for tire boat 1. Approved. 



Recommending that the Civil Service Com- 
mission be requested to take immediate steps 
to hold an examination for firemen for this 
department. Approved. 

Submitting a report of the trial and test of 
the automobile chemical contracted for from 
the American-La France Fire Apparatus Co. 
Also report fsom the superintendent of en- 
gines to the effect, that the same is con- 
structed in accordance with the specifica- 
tions. Accepted. 

Submitting a complaint against Loe Cas- 
tillo, truckman truck 12, for being under the 
influence of liquor while on duty on the 16th 
inst. Charges filed. 

From Albert Jacobsen, requesting that he 
be placed on the eligible list of temporary 
firemen. Filed. 

From Wm. Lawrence, requesting that his 
name be placed on the list of temporary fire- 
men. Filed. 

From E. J. King, truckman truck 1, appli- 
cation for salary on account of injury. Laid 
over. 

From W. J. Bullier, hoseman engine 19. 
application for salary on account of injury. 
Granted. 

John J. Kane, boiler maker at the corpora- 
tion yard, application for salary on account 
of injury. Granted. 

Petition of Patrick O'Connell to be reinstat- 
ed as a member of the department. Denied. 

Investigation of Wm. J. Bannon, cap- 
tain truck 9, on account of damage to ladder 
of apparatus. Reprimand. 

Application of Paul Pyritz, hoseman relief 
engine 3, for a leave of absence for three 
months. Laid over. 

Investigation of complaint against John 
Feren, pilot fire boat 1 (special order for 8:30 
o'clock.) Complaint dismissed. 

Investigation of complaint against J. J. 
Meaney, pilot fire boat 2 (special order for 
9 o'clock.) $25.00. 

Trial of Henry Mulligan, hoseman engine 
41, charged with failing to report for duty at 
the expiration of leave of absence. Thirty 
days. 

Trial of John McLaughlin, stoker engine43, 
for neglecting to pay his just and lawful 
debts, contractu! while in the department. 
Agreed to pay $25 a month until hills are paid. 

Consideration of bids received for automo- 
biles. Will take up delivery truck at next 
meeting. 

Upon recommendation of Chief Murphy, 
J. L. Madison was appointed temporary hose- 
man to lill a vacancy in engine 28. 

Chief Murphy was instructed to present to 
the commissioners at their next meeting a 
list of all unnecessary employes in the depart- 
ment. A resolution was also adopted author- 
izing the child' to recummi no For appointment 
as substitutes such men as hi- deem< d wort In. 
regardless id' tin ir position on list established 
by previous board. 

During the recent cold fnap in Chicago 
fires increased in i umber ui id one <!:i\ there 
were 167 of i hem. The bitter cold hud fire 
men low; fires which tiny could have easily 
handled on a summer day gol out <<( their 
control because the water turned to ice and 
shielded the Homes in gigantic ice chimt 



An Effort to Marry Off Feldhaus. 

The members of engine company 27 are all 
old married men, we understand, with the 
exception of Joe Feldhaus, he being a bache- 
lor, it jarred their sensibilities to see one 
of their members enjoying single blessedness, 
so they held a secret meeting last week un- 
beknown to Joe and appointed a committee, 
consisting of Captain Mathewson, Lieutenant 
Trivitt and Wm. Siewert to devise ways and 
means of furnishing Joe with a proper help- 
mate, but were unable to come to any con- 
clusion as to what sort of girl Joe should be 
hooked up to. In their dilemma the commit- 
tee decided to call to their aid two more mem- 
bers, and Tom Coogan was added on account 
of his extraordinary ability for being a judge 
of good fire engines, and Joe Burnett for his 
keen knowledge of horses and picking out 
people with good dispositions, etc. 

In a postscript the committee suggests that 
any member of the department who knows of 
a young lady he is willing to recommend, he 
might, as an inducement, inform her that Joe 
owns an automobile; he might also inciden- 
tally mention something about the beauties 
of joy riding on moonlight nights, etc.; and 
if that fails Joe must be fated to die a cranky 
old bachelor. 



The Policemen's Ball. 

The policemen's annual ball, formerly held 
on Washington's birthday, 22d of February, 
will this year take place on the 15th. For 
the past two weeks the several committees 
have been actively engaged in their respec- 
tive duties, and the committee of arrange- 
ments promise that the coming affair will 
eclipse all former efforts, as no pains are be- 
ing spared to make it a grand succcess. As 
many of the "finest" attended the recent 
fire-fighters' first reception and ball, several 
of the "bravest" propose to reciprocate by 
lending their presence in full evening dress 
to the auspicious occasion. The ball is to be 
held in the Auditorium. 

The Mean Thing. 

A story too good to keep comes to us of a 
well known fireman of Los Angeles who woke 
up one night recently to find bis wife going 
through his pants pockets, where he keeps his 
money. When he asked her what sin- was 
after she stammered and said she was "sew- 
ing on a button that appeared to be missing. " 
And what did tin 1 mean old son of Adam do 
hid gel right out of bed ami find two buttons 
on his coat, three mi his vest, and threi 
bis underclothes that were just about n 

to drop olT. and sit I her. and make I lie woman 
Sew ''in on, remarking all the time upon ilio 
though tfulnesa of such a loving little woman 
who could crawl oiil of hid on a cold night 

just to see that her husband's clothes were in 

good repair. 

If you want t" ho miserable thick about 
yourself about what you want, what you 

like, w hal respect t pi ighl to paj to you 

and wdiai people think oi you 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 
JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

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to Douglass and 24th streets. 



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HomeM 1618 



UNION FLORIST 

Formerly of 25 Fourth Street 

3017 SIXTEENTH STREET 



Fire Chief Rother of Sonoma has 
asked authority to purchase 500 feet 
of additional fire hose. 



Phone Market 1795 Home J 1795 

JOE. H. ROSENBERG 

GHnil anb iHilitary Sailor 

73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 
Louii Frankenberg. formerly wilh Rosenblum fit Abraham, Manager 




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FIREMEN EAT AT THE 

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Where you get the best for the least money. 
H. O. DALBEV. M E r. 

178 THIRD ST., San Francisco 

OPEN TILL MIDNIGHT. Phone Douglas 2646 



READERS 

FIND WHAT THEY WANT 

IN THE BOOK LINE 

— AT THE 

BOOK OMNORIUM 

WILLIAM McDEVITT, Manager 

1004 FILLMORE STREET 

Near McAllister 



Howard Watches 



SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



When the U. S. Battleship "Maine" was sunk in Havana 
Harbor. Admiral Sigsbee's HOWARD Watch went 
down with it. 

It lay in sea water for five dayB— was recovered by a 
navy diver— and to-day it wxrioa less than ten teconda a 

month, which is a ratio of one second in 2K0 000. Admiral 
Sissbee has carried his HOWARD Watch since 1868. 

It has cruised in eighteen vessels of the U. S. Navy — 
over a distance of two hundred and eighty-eight thousand 
miles. 

It has set the standard tirnt in taking observations for 
navigating— where a few seconds' error may spelt disaster 
to the ship. A service so exacting that even the ship's 
chronometers have to be checked up in every port 

A HOWARD Watch is always worth what you pay 
for it. 

The price of each HOWARD is fixed at the factory and 
a printed ticket attached from the 17-jewell (double 
roller escapement) in a "Jas. Boss" or "«'r--srent" gold- 
filled case at $40. to the 23-jewelI in a 14K solid gold case 
at $150. 

Not every jeweler can sell you a HOWARD Watch. 
Find the HOWARD jeweler in your town and talk to 
him. He is a good man to know. 



15,000 MAGAZINES OF ALL SORTS 
20,000 VOLUMES - NEW AND OLD 



" The Book Omnorium Buys Old Books." 

We Sell, Rent, Exchange 
Books rented 5c a week 



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M. R. C. V. S. 

..VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D. 



1155 GOLDEN GATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal 



M. L. MILCOVICH. Prop. 

Martin's Restaurant and Grill 

1533 STE1NER STREET 

Near Geary San Franci.co 



FINE JOB PRINTING 



THE PACIFIC FIREMAN, 470 Turk Street 



Telephone DoueJa, 287 1 Home C 4992 

WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRANT BROKERS 
630 KEARNY' STREET 



T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AIND JEWELRY 

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In offering Salvar to the public, we do so 
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we will abide by a decision so given and dis- 
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any particular from what it is represented to be. 

SEITZ & MILLS. Agents 
1402 Market St., near 10th, San Francisco 




VOL. IX.-NO. 5. 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 cents. 



An Heroic Rescue. 

The Thrilling Narative of an Heroic Deed of 
Rescue by Battalion Chief Murray. 

The accuracy of the following thrill- 
ing story of Battalion Chief Murray's 
rescue of George Schofield, the stow- 
away in the steamer Ceylon, is vouched 
for by Lieutenant Frank L. Smith, a 
member of the San Francisco fire de- 
partment. The events of the rescue 
appeared in the daily press at the time, 
but the account subjoined from the 
pen of Eugene B. Block of this city, 
which appeared in the World Wide 
Magazine for December, 1911, is the 
first and only complete narrative of a 
deed of heroic daring which can never 
be forgotten so long as the annals of 
heroism are read. 

In a preface the author says: 

The most sensational of fiction-writers 
never imagined a situation more appalling 
than that in which Schofield and Leveque, 
two stowaways on hoard the French steamer 
Ceylon, found themselves in May. 19f8. An 
awful death menaced the pair of them. There 
was a possible avenue of escape — but for one 
man only; and then and there they commenced 
a terrible battle to decide which man was to 
live and which to die. 

LIKE savage beasts, bereft of all 
human instincts save self-pres- 
ervation, iwo stoways, who were 
being slowly suffocated by sulphur- 
fumes, fought a terrific battle for 
their lives in the steel forecastle of 
the French steamer Ceylon on the 
morning of May 19, 1908. Locked 
in the dark compartment below decks 
while the steamer was being fumi- 
gated, the prisoners strove to secure 
a position near an open port-hole a 
vantage-place big enough for our man 



only, where, if undisturbed, he might 
ward off death by breathing pure air 
until help came. 

The fight, therefore, became a 
brutal combat for the survival of the 
fittest, neither man caring for the life 
of the other; each thinking only of 
gaining the place at the port-hole and 
saving himself. When one of them 
finally succeeded in wresting himself 




B\TTAI.ION CHIEF CIIAS. MURRAY 
who re.cued the ilowawoy. Geo. Schofield. from denlh 

from the other's grasp ami thrusting 
his head through the port, the second 
man. half-senseless, tore at his gar- 
ments and tried to pull him away. 
Before he could accomplish his pur- 
post . however, the choking funics had 
sim ii \ tl otii h s life and he fell dead 
at the feet <>f his more fortunate com- 
panion, who himself was gasping for 
breath at the aperture. The surviv- 



ing stowaway was rescued more than 
an hour later just as he, in turn, was 
about to collapse over the corpse of 
the man whom he had conquered in 
the grim struggle for life. 

George Schofield and Ernest Le- 
veque were the men who engaged in 
this desperate fight against death. It 
was Schofield who gained and kept the 
position by the port-hole. Both men 
were residents of Vancouver, B. C, 
and had stowed away aboard the 
steamer on the night before the strug- 
gle while she lay at the dock at San 
Francisco, California. The vessel was 
to sail for the North on the following 
day, and they had anticipated a free 
return trip home. 

At the time neither knew of the 
other's presence. That night they 
met in the chain-lockerand exchanged 
hurried salutations. Introductions 
were dispensed with as unbefitting 
the occasion, and neither man knew 
the other's name. 

They talked of their success in get- 
ting aboard the steamer, and slept 
through the night well hidden from 
the crew. The next morning they 
climbed into the forecastle and secret- 
ed themselves in a dark corner of the 
firemen's mess-room. All was peace- 
ful and quiet They did not know, as 
they chatted together, that the quar- 
antine officials had begun to fumigate 
the vessel, ami that tins of burning 
sulphur bail been placed in the I 
castle. 

Suddenly Schofield detected the 
odor of sulphur smoke, and realized 
that the steamer was being fumigat- 
ed. The choking vapor poured 
the mess-room, and the two men scur- 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



ried here and there, trying in vain to 
open the doors leading from the com- 
partment, but these had all been se- 
curely locked in order that the fumi- 
gation might be thorough. 

In the meantime the dingy fore- 
castle was filling with dense clouds of 
poisonous smoke, and the two stow- 
aways were slowly being overcome; 
they gasped for fresh air while they 
sought vainly for a means of escape. 
With increasing terror they heard the 
thud of the hatch-covers being closed 
above them; they were boxed in a liv- 
ing tomb. 

Then suddenly, through the thick- 
ening clouds of smoke, Schofield dis- 
cerned the outline of an open port- 
hole in the ship's side. Quickly he 
stepped to the aperture, realizing that 
here was his only chance to breathe 
pure air and escape asphyxiation. 
Leveque saw his dash to the opening 
and, half senseless from suffocation, 
he staggered aftef his companion. 
He reached the port just as Schofield 
put his head through the aperture and 
filled his lungs with a breath of fresh 
air. But the opening was only large 
enough to admit one man's head. 

The most primitive instinct of 
man — self-preservation— rose high in 
the half-deadened brain of Leveque, 
and he understood that he must gain 
the port quickly in order to save his 
life. With strength almost equal to 
that of a madman, he grabbed the 
legs of his companion and tried with 
all his might to pull him away. 

But Schofield himself realized that 
this was to be a fight for life that 
could end only with the death of one 
man or both. So, seizing Leveque by 
the shoulders, he tried to throw him 
to the floor. Gasping for breath and 
scarcely able to see, with the clouds 
of deadly smoke ever thickening about 
them, the men strugglsd fiercely, 
striving for the place before the port- 
hole. Each man thought only of sav- 
ing himself, caring naught for the 
other. The proximity of an awful 
death made the two helpless wretches 
forget all human instincts, and they 
battled on like beasts. 

Now one man was thrown to the 
floor, only to gain his feet again and 
seize the other as he jumped for the 
port-hole; now the pair, choking and 



snarling, were wrestling on the floor. 
Time and again one freed himself 
from the other's hold and sprang for 
the opening, only to be pounced on by 
his adversary and dragged away 
again. 

Finally Schofield, the stronger of 
the two, succeeded in shaking off Le- 
veque. Almost unconscious from 
asphyxiation, he grasped the handle 
of the port-cover and thrust his head 
through the opening. As he leaned 
there, gasping for pure air amid the 
fumes that poured from the hole 
around his head, he heard the other 
man trying to open the adjoining port- 
holes. 

All of them, however, were securely 
fastened up, and the unfortunate pris- 
oner uttered piercing shrieks as he 
realized that he was doomed to suffo- 
cate in the smoke-filled compartment. 
With bulgingeyes, half-blinded by the 
poisonous smoke, and panting for 
breath, Leveque stumbled to where 
Schofield was leaning. Once again he 
seized him and tried desperately to 
drag him away. In his frenzy he tore 
at the clothing of the man by the port, 
ripping the garments almost to rib- 
bons. But Schofield had secured him- 
self by bracing his knees against the 
bulkhead below the opening, and his 
hold was too firm for the weaker man 
to drag him away. 

Frantically Leveque pulled at the 
more fortunate prisoner, until the rem- 
nant of his strength was exhausted, 
and he fell dead at the feet of Scho- 
field, the victor in that awful battle for 
life. 

Though Schofield still stood with his 
head outside the port-hole, he could 
breathe but little pure air, for the dead- 
ly sulphur fumes were oozing out of 
the aprrture all around him. He was 
nearly unconscious when James Pa- 
gan, a teamster on the quay, chanced 
to see the livid face of the stowaway, 
horribly distorted, hanging limply out- 
side the port-hole. 

The teamster realized at once that 
not a moment should be wasted if the 
dying man was to be rescued. Hur- 
riedly he climbed up a hawser to the 
deck and notified the crew of the stow- 
away's plight. Then began one of the 
most heroic rescues ever effected on 
the water-front of San Francisco. 



It was evident to the crew that the 
man gasping at the ship's side could 
not immediately be extricated from 
the smoke-filled forecastle, and they 
understood that they must by some 
means prevent the fumes from reach- 
ing him. While ventilators and hatch- 
covers were hastily pulled open to ad- 
mit fresh air into the chamber, some 
of the sailors set to work to construct 
a rope staging, which they slung over 
the side of the steamer. On this a man 
descended to the open port. 

Water was put to Schofield's parched 
lips and his swollen face was bathed. 
The acrid fumes, however, were still 
pouring through the opening, prevent- 
ing the stowaway from breathing the 
pure air that he needed. It was obvi- 
ous that unless something was done at 
once the poor fellow would soon fall 
back beside his dead companion. Oak- 
um was accordingly packed about the 
man's head to check the escape of the 
smoke. 

Not a member of the crew dared en- 
[Continued <>u Page Four."] 



Phone Home C 2458 



Lamanet Bros. 

Is the place of all places to get (he 
very latest and best in the way oi 

FIREMEN'S REGULATION SHIRTS 
FIREMEN'S TURNOUT SUITS 
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PACIFIC FIREMAN 




PUBLISHED EVEKY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 



Editorial Rooms and Business Office, 479 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 



Entered as second-class matter March 21, 1908, at the 
Postollice al San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress <•!" March :;. IsTvt. 



SATURDAY 



FEBRUARY 3. 1912 



An Heroic Rescue. 



(Continued from Page Two.) 

ter the forecastle, filled as it was with 
poisonous sulphur, one breath of which 
meant certain death. More hatches 
were opened, and water was poured 
into the compartment, but it was a 
slow task. Presently officers and sail- 
ors together descended to the mess- 
room and tried to enter; but at the 
door they were driven back by the 
blinding, suffocating smoke. Many at- 
tempts were made to enter the com- 
partment, but each time the would-be 
rescuers were forced to retreat; the 
utmost they could do was to remove 
one of the sulphur-pots which were 
emittigg the deadly fumes. To reach 
the man at the port-hole seemed an im- 
possibility. 

Almost an hour had elapsed when 
Battalion Chief Charles Murray, of the 
fire department, reached the scene. 
Murray realized the danger, but he de- 
termined to risk his life to save that of 
Schofield. Tying a wet sponge over 
his nose and mouth, he descended to 
the mess-room and stepped in, only to 
be driven back by the smoke. 

Undaunted by the failure of his first 
attempt, Murray made three more ef- 
forts to reach the dying stowaway at 
the port-hole, and his fourth attempt 
proved successful. At the peril of his 
life Chief Murray bravely groped his 
way through the mess-room, grabbed 
the unconscious prisoner, and carried 
him outside the compartment, where 
he was met and assisted by members 
of the crew. Murray himself was al- 
most overcome by the fumes when he 
came out of the mess-room. 

Schofield was rushed to a hospital, 
and it was many hours before lie re- 
gai 1 consciousnes. When the fore- 



castle had been finally cleared of 
smoke, members of the crew came 
upon the body of the other stowaway, 
lying stretched on the floor. 

After Schofield had been resuscitat- 
ed he was told of the find, and sudden- 
ly recalled the grim fight for life. As 
he lay in his cot at the hospital he told 
a graphic story of the struggle at the 
port-hole. 

"We understood plainly that one of 
us must die," he said, "for we could 
see that only one man could put his 
head through the opening at a time. 
When the other man came after me— 
and it was only natural that he should 
—I realized that it was to be a fight to 
the finish. 

"I struggled with all my might, and 
1 guess I was a little stronger than the 
other fellow. That is why I am here 
now. It was horrible to feel the poor 
fellow tearing at my clothes, after he 
had failed to open any of the other 
ports. His eyes bulged from his head 
and his tongue hung from his mouth. 
I shall always be haunted by a vision 
of him. 

"When I get strong again I guess 1 
will go to work here until I have earned 
enough money to pay my way back to 
Vancouver. I have had one experi- 
ence as a stowaway, and that is enough 
for the rest of my life. I think I am 
a very lucky man." 

' 'I wasdetermined to rescue thesto w- 
awa.v," declared Chief Murray, after 
Schofield had been taken away. "I 
had to make four attempts before I 
finally suceeded in reaching the man. 
Volumes of smoke poured from the 
door leading into the mess-room, and 
each time I tried toenter— even though 
my mouth and nose were covered with 
a wet. sponge— I was blinded by the 
deadly fumes and almost choked. 

"Finally I decided in what direction 
I should have to step in order to reach 
the port-hole; then I closed my eyes, 
adjusted the sponge— or muzzle, as we 
term it and bolted through the com- 
partment; for I realized that unless 
something was done at once the stow- 
away would soon be suffocated. 

"Once inside, I opened my eyes for 
an instant, seized the man in my arms 
and carried him out. It is a miracle 
that he was alive, for I was nearly 
overcome myself by the dense fumes. 



I am satisfied that he would have lived 
but a few seconds longer had he been 
left in the mess-room." 

Reminiscences of the Los Angeles Fire 
Department. 

BY PERCY "KID" WILLIAMS. 

The minute he put up his hands I knew he 
didn't know a Ihing about the game, so with 
one bull- like rush he came after me, with his 
head down and his hands apart. I jumped a 
little aside, and, as he passed me, I right- 
crossed him square on the point and down he 
went, but not for long. He was game to the 
core. He got up staggering and with blood 
in his eyes. He waited a second and then 
swung both hands at me like a couple of 
sledge hammers. He missed me and grabbed 
me by the waist and pulled me down to the 
floor. He had a most powerful grip and I 
knew it would never do for him to get me 
down, for I felt that if ever he hit me when 
I was down I never would get up, he was 
that powerful. But the referee stopped him 
and pulled us apart and set us on our feet 
and we started to go to it again. Quick 
as s flash I saw an opening for his jaw and 
I gave him a terriffk left-hand swing that 
put him down and out for keeps. He was 
bleeding from his nose and ears and was roll- 
ing on the floor moaning, and it was then that 
Vince McGilvaray was scared for the first 
time in his life. They poured water on him 
and gave him ammonia, and finally, just as 
ihey got him so he could open his eyes and 
get his bearings, the gong went and sure 
enough it was go for our company. I had til- 
ready taken my gloves off and was busy husk- 
ing him on the hose wagon and was about 
to take his gloves off, but some one winked 
and I left them on him. The last we saw of 
Young Sharkey he was leading a line into the 
blaze with a pair of four-ounce boxing gloves 
on his hands and a very badly disfigured coun- 
tenance. 

But McGilvaray didn't play any more tricks 
for some little time. He was too .scared after 
the lime he had bringing our friend back int.. 
the land of the living. 1 think his hair got a 
little whiter after thai, and Vince has the fin- 
est head of gray hair in the department. Hut 
this escapade cured him for awhile. 
[To lie continued next wet fc. 1 

Open Air Baseball Club. 

SAN FRANCISO, JAN. 29, 1912. 
Editor PactAc Fireman. 

Dear Sir: The Open Air Baseball Club 

have organized forthecoming season of 1912, 
under the management of Dave Capelli of en- 
gine 20, and are now having their Bpring prac- 
tice at I.otms Square, al the fu f Webster 

it. ,i. and just to show you thai the boys are 
in line shape, en Sunday laal they • 
trimmed the fast and frisky Colts in a fast 
an. I exciting game, and now we are wailing 
anxiously for the Cops i<> gel their nine i" 
,.,-i hi r o we .-an administer t" i hem ju 
T , i . . r i do of the same medicine thai wi 
ih, in m the relaj race al the Auditorium, and 



I' A C 1 F I C FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Stage realism attains its acme in the 
second act of "The Man Between," a 
play by Rupert Hughes, which is to be 
given its first presentation in the West 
next Monday evening at the Alcazar. 
When the curtain rises there is dis- 
closed a steel cantilever bridge, span- 
ning a mountain gorge, in course of 
construction, with busy workmen 
astride swinging girders and white-hot 
rivets flying through the air as they 
pass from the furnace to the mechan- 
ics who drive them home, while the 
clanging of hammers on iron and the 
shouts of the toilers enhance the im- 
pressiveness of the scene. 

Bertram Lytell will be seen as Stod- 
dard, Evelyn Vaughan as Miss Van 
Nest, Louis Bennison as her father, 
Will R. Walling as the aristocrat she 
jilted, Charles Ruggles as a typical 
young society man, Beth Taylor as 
Stoddard's ingenuous young sister, 
Adele Belgarde as a society widow, 
and Viola Leach as a dashing society 
girl. There are four acts in the play, 
and the places shown are the library 
of Van Nest's mansion, the unfinished 
bridge in the mountains, an inn near 
the bridge and the corridor of a New 
York hotel. 



. . Where Gorham Auto Fire Engines are Made 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



Empress Theatre. 



There are no less than three feat- 
ures on the bill which will open Sun- 
day afternoon at the Empress theatre. 
At the top spot on the bill will be Fret' 
Eckhoff and Anna Gordon. A novelty 
will be the specialty of Mile. Cecile 
Francois and Company, in artistic pos- 
ing. A third feature will be the char- 
acter actor, James Grady, and his se- 
lected company, presenting "The Toll 
Bridge,"' Bert Van Klein and Grace 
Gibson, musical comedy favorites, who 
have made a great big hit in New York 
when they played at the Wintergar- 
ten. Ted Lenore, singing comedian, 
does not make many pretentions, but 
he delivers the results. Marin and 
L°na are on their first trip to the Pa- 
cific Coast. Rosette and Marguerite 
will offer some new, novel and refresh- 
ing bits of conjuring, drollery, eccen- 
tricity and skill combined. The Five 
Pertleys have an aerial gymnastic act 
that is out of the ordinary. 

Subscribe for the Pacific Fireman. 




GORHAM ENGINEERING AND FIRE APPARATUS CO. 



SEATTLE 
216 Jaclcscn Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 

48 Fremont Street 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 S. Olive Street 



American Rubber Mfg. Co. 

9-11 Beale Street, San Francis:o, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories— Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 

WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 

Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose, Brass 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Department Supplies 

Eureka Hire Hose Alfg. Co. 




WE ARE LEADERS IN THE MANUFACTURE OF 

FIRE DEPARTMENT HOSE 



EUREKA, PARAGON AND RED CROSS BRANDS 




EUREKA FIRE HOSE MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

SO = GO FREMONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

W. A. DAGGETT. ... Pacific Coast Manacer 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



we don't want any of that Mann stuff. We 
want the best they have. Look the boys over 
and see what you think of them. 

The following is the line-up: 
Phil Moholy, catcher G. Cuneo, right field 
Ed Shea, Pitcher capt H. Carter, center " 
Dave Levy, 1st base D.O'Donnell.left " 
J. Gavin, 2d base C. Brennan, extra 
T. Connors, 3d base T. Buckley. " 
E. Hackett, shortstop Bill Parry, mascot 

Thanking: you in advance, I remain yours 
respectfully. Dave Capelli, Manager. 



San Francisco Fire Commissioners. 



At the regular meeting of the Board of 
Fire Commissioners held Thursday, February 
1, 1912, at 5:30 p. m. (all members being pres- 
ent) the following business was transacted: 

Resignation of James J. Johnson, hoseman 
relief engine 1, to take effect from January 
21, 1912. 

Opinion of City Attorney, advising board 
that the reinstatement of Paul Pyritz was in- 
valid, and that the granting of his request for 
a leave of absence would be of no value. Re- 
quest for leave of absence denied. 

Communication from John Fay, captain en- 
gine 22, requesting that he be granted a leave 
of absence for one month, without pay, com- 
mencing February 1, 1912, on account of sick- 
ness. Granted. 

Recommendation from Chief Engineer Mur- 
phy that Creed O. Lark be permanently ap- 
pointed a member of the department, he hav- 
ing satisfactorily served his probationary 
term, to take effect February 1, 1912. Ap- 
proved atid so ordered. 

Recommendation from chief engineer that 
the following changes of positions be made, 
to take effect from date: 

A. J. Hennessey from hoseman to stoker 
engine 6; Robert Dugan from truckman to 
ti Herman truck 7. Approved and so ordered. 

Communication from William Scheper, ho-e 
man engine 17, requesting that he be granted 
;i leave of absence for two months, without 
pav, commencing January 25, 1912, on account 
of sickness. Granted. 



A special iiieeiing of the Board of Fire 
mi-'sioners was held on January 30al 5 30 p. m. 
All present. 

Trial of Clarence J. Lee, hoseman engine 
23, charged with being under the influence of 
intoxicating liquor while on duty on January 

22, 1912. Lee appeared before the Board and 
requested permission to tender his resignation 
as a member of the department, (Iran ted. 

The resignation of Clarence .1. Lee as a 
nlember of the department was read and on 
motion accepted, to take effect fromdate-. In 
view of ile' re ignalion of C. J. 1 the con- 
sideration of the abov harge against him 

was indefinitely pot poned. 

Trial of John McCarthy, hoseman engine 
29. charged with absenting himself from duly 
without permission on January 22, 1912. Mr- 
Carthy appeared before the bo. ml and plead- 
ed guilty, as charged. On motion il was or- 
dered that he be pi i rod under suspension from 
service in the department for a period of l> 



months, without pay, from January 22, 1912, 
by the following vote: Ayes, Commissioners 
Dillon, Donohoe, Pfaeffle and President Bran- 
denstein. 

The administrative committee submitted 
the following rep.irt: 

Your administrative committee respectfully 
desires to report that after a preliminary in- 
vestigation of the matter it is its opinion that 
the best interests of this department and of 
the municipality would be subserved by dis- 
pensing with certain non-civil service posi- 
tions in the department and the dismissal of 
the persons temporarily occupying the same, 
as it is apparent to this committee that the 
services of the persons occupying these posi- 
tions are not required and that a saving of ap- 
proximately $1,806.50 per month would there- 
by be effected. We would therefore recom- 
mend that the following non-civil service tem- 
porary employes be dismissed from further 
service in the department, to take effect from 
and after January 31, 1912: 

P. Hallinan, drayman, $100 per month; J. 
F. Sullivan, physician and surgeon, $1.50 per 
month: E. P. Healy, assistant superintendent 
of engines, $155 per month; James Grace, 
clerk and commissary, $150 per month; W. H. 
Augustine, assistant clerk and commissary, 
$125 per month; B. Wascerwitz, boiler mak- 
ers' helper, $100 per month; C. Jenkins, mill- 
hand helper, $100 per month; J. J. Coughlin, 
harness maker, 4$. 25 per diem; J. F. Camp- 
bell, carriage painter, $4 50 per diem; Geo. 
McCanhy, blacksmith helper, $3.75 per diem; 
D. McLaughlin, woodworker, $4 50 per diem; 
H. NeidHuger, millhand, $5.00 per diem; J.J. 
Carmody, steamlitter'shelper, $3.00 perdiem; 
J. Maginnis, store and toolroom keeper, $4.50 
per diem; W. J. Hudson, machinist, $4.50 per 
diem. 

We would also recommend that William 
O'Connor, at present acting as a temporary 
engineer, and detailed for duty to the depart- 
ment stables, be restored to his regular rank 
and position of hoseman in the department, 
to take effect on and after February 1, 1912, 
and subject to assignment for duty by the 
chief engineer. 

In accordance with the foregoii g report we 
would respectfully recommend that the at- 
tached resolul ions be adopted : 

The following resolutions were unanimously 
adO| led: 

Resolved, That acting under the written 
authority of the Civil Service Commission, 
under date of January 25, 1912, the following 
temporarily appointed draymen in this depart- 
ment be and they are hereby dismissed from 
further Bervice therein, to take effect from 
and in. i' Jai o trj 31, 1912: 1'. Hallinan, E. 
.1 Rut ledge, 'I' -i Regan at d M. Joj ce. 

Resolved, Tlmi the following named civil 
service eligible li-t watchmen be and they are 
hereby app'oint* d in Ruch positions in this de- 
partment, to lake , lie, | mi and after Febru- 
ary l. 1912: John T Rrgan, 11. F. [I 
Bernard lv Da\ is. David .1 Byrm 

A 1 - tolved, That ' he follow ing namt <i non 
civil service temporary employes of thl 
part ineiii be ami i hey ate hereby dfsmi ed 



from further service therein, such dismissals 
totakeeffect from and after January 31, 1912: 

J. F. Sullivan, physician and surgeon; R. P. 
Healy, assistant superintendent of engines; 
James Grace, clerk and commissary; W. H. 
Augustine, assistant clerk and commissary; 
B. Wascerwitz, boiler maker's helper; C. 
Jenkins, millhand helper; J. J. Coughlin, har- 
ness maker; J. F. Campbell, carriage painter; 
George McCarthy, blacksmith helper; D. Mc- 
Laughlin, woodworker; H. Neidlinger, mill- 
hand; J. J. Carmody, steamfitter's helper; J. 
Maginnis, store and toolroom keeper; W. J. 
Hudson, machinist. 

On motion the secretary was directed to 
forward a communication to His Honor, the 
Mayor, requesting that he recommend to the 
Board of Supervisors the creation of the posi- 
tion of stenographer and typewriter for this 
department. 

On motion the action of the board, at its 
meeting on January 25, 1912, in dismissing 
Leo Castillo, truckman truck 12, from the de- 
partment, was rescinded and he was restored 
to membership. 

On motion it was ordered that Leo Castillo 
be suspended from duty in the department for 
a period of six months, without pay, com- 
mencing on January 16, 1912, bv the follow- 
ing vote: Ayes, Commissioners Dillon, Dono- 
hoe, Pfaeffle and President Brandenstein. 



A special meeting of the Board of Fire Com- 
missioners for the consideration of bids for 
motor-driven delivery trucks was held on Jan- 
uary 31 at 5:30 p. m. All present. 

Mr. C. S. Richards, representing the Reli- 
ance Automobile Company, protested against 
the bids of the Consolidated Car Company and 
the White Company, claiming that these 
firms did not bid in strict accordance with the 
specifications. 

On motion the matter was referred to the 
City Attorney for an opinion as to whether 
all the bids received do or do not comply with 
the specifications prepared by this depart- 
ment, both in point of detail of bid and in 
point of signature of bidder. 

On motion it was the sense of the board 
that hereafter the regular meeting will be 
Imld at 5:3 p. m. Thursdays. 

On motion the secretary was directed to 
communicate with the principal cities of the 
United Stales, requesting informati.n a: to 
their methods of obtaining and selecting 
motor driven apparatus by bids or otherwise. 

The Policeman's Ball. 

The policeman's bull for the benefit of the 
Widows" and Orphans' Association will be 
held ai the I loliseum February 15. 
io arrangi merits, i he committee stati 
much gn ati r atti ndat .■. than ever befot 
., il I here has been 20,000 tick. 

sued and they are going "like hot cakes." it 

is reported They were placed on sale for the 

tirsi time in i Saturday, Mayor Rolph will 

I I'll It IS v.-,i,| ,, 

ill be on hand to make *■' n 
ona betwei 
Thanksi ■■ 

for the Pai i IN. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and coquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening, Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Reach Nurseries, take Castro street ear to 23rd. ot 

Mission, 21th street and Hoffman avenue ear 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



EAGLESON & CO. 

1158 MARKET ST. 

PHONE MARKET 5417 

MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS 

AND SHIRTS 

Guaranteed Navy Flannel Firemen's 
Shirts 

alio I 1 2 Soulh Spring Street, Los Anneal 



To-morrow will be another day, 
but the majority of us will be up 
against the same old grind. 



Phone Muriel 1795 



Home J 1795 



JOE. H. ROSENBERG 

(Until anu iflilihuu iSaiuir 

73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 
Louis Frankenbera. formerly with Rosenblum & Abraham. Manager 



A. CORVI 



Phones Market 3285 
HomeM16l6 



UNION FLORIST 



Formerly of 25 Fourth Street 

3017 SIXTEENTH STREET 




DRESS SUITS RENTED 



All Occasions 



l_. SKOLL 

305 KEARNY ST. 

Phone. Kearny 2280 Home C 6323 



Funeral Word a Specially at 
Lowest Prices 



Orders Promptly Atlended to 



Gold and Silver Trimmings. All Kinds of Gold Embroider- 
ing Dune to Order. 

Telephone Douglas S600 

BLOOM BROS. Inc. 

MAT AND CAP FACTORY 

M ilitary and Navy Caps a Specially 

109 NEW M0NTG0NERY ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



FIREMEN EAT AT THE 

...B. &. D. RESTAURANT... 

Where you net the best for the least money. 
H. O. DALBEY. Mur. 

178 THIRD ST., San Francisco 

OPEN TILL MIDNIGHT. Phone Douelas 2546 

NA/rvl. F. EGAN 

M. R. C. V. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D. 



1155 GOLDEN GATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 

M. L. M1LCOVICH. Prop. 

Martin's Restaurant and Grill 

1533 STE1NER STREET 

Near Gearv San Francisco 



-FOR 



FINE JOB PRINTING 



THE PACIFIC FIREMAN, 479 Turk Street 



READERS 

FIND WHAT THEY WANT 

IN THE BOOK LINE 

— AT THE 

BOOK OMNORIUM 

WILLIAM McDEVITT. Manager 

1004 FILLMORE STREET 

Near McAllister 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



When the U. S. Battleship "Maine" was sunk in Havana 
Harbor. Admiral Sigsbee's HOWARD Watch went 
down with it. 

It lay in sea water for five days-was recovered by a 
navy diver— and to-day it varies less than ten Seconds a 
month, which is s ratio of one second in 2fi0 000. Admiral 
Sigsbee has carried his HOWARD Watch since 1868. 

It has cruised in eighteen vessels of the U. S. Navy- 
over a distance of two hundred and eighty-eight thousand 
miles. 

It has set the standard time in taking observations for 
navigating— where a few seconds' error may spell disaster 
to the ship. A service so exacting that even the ship's 
chronometers have to be checked up in every port 

A HOWARD Watch is always worth what you pay 
for it. 

The price of each HOWARD is fixed at the factory and 
a printed ticket attached — from the ]7-jewell (double 
roller escapement) in a "Jas. Boss" or "Crescent" gold- 
filled case at %H>. to the 23-jewell in a 14K solid gold case 
at $150. 

Not every jeweler can sell you a HOWARD Watch. 
Find the HOWARD jeweler in your town and talk to 
him. He is a good man to know. 



T. M. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 

71 WALLER ST . SAN F R ANCISCO 

SALVAR 

( I Will Save ) 

The Greatest BLOOD REMEDY in the World 

-WILL CURE 

RHEUMATISM 

Acute or Chronic 



15,000 MAGAZINES OF ALL SORTS 
•20,000 VOLUMES NEW 4ND OLD 

" The Book Omnorium Buys Old Books." 

We Sell, Rent, Exchange 
Books rented 5c a week 



Telephone Douglas 287 I 



Home C 4992 



WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 



WARRANT BROKERS 



630 KEARNY STREET 



COR. COMMERCIAL 



SAN FRANCISCO 



The Little Emporium 

L. R1ZN1C Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SrKCIALTY 
2296-98 GEARY STREET 

Neat Broderitk 
Telephone West 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 



BLOOD POISON 



Acquired or Hereditary 



PARALYSIS 
CATARRH 
MALARIA 



Diseases of Liver, Kidneys and Bladder 



Diseases Peculiar to Women 



$10.00 FOR 40 TO 60 DAYS' TREATMENT 

Call ar Writ, for our 100 Page Booklist 

TO THE PUBLIC 

In offering Salvar to the public, we do so 
with perfect confidence, and state publicly our 
willingness to have our remedy thoroughly tested 
in any fair and equitable manner, in the treat- 
ment of all diseases we claim it will relieve, and 
we will abide by a decision so given and dis- 
continue its sale at once if it is found different in 
any particular from what it is represented to be. 

SEITZ & MILLS, Agents 
1402 Market St., near 10th, San Francisco 




VOL. IX. -NO. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 cents. 



Perished in the Flames 

Asst. Chief Wolf's Body, Charred and Burned 
Beyond Recognition, Found in the Ruins 

From the Walla Walla Bulletin of 
January 29 we take the following ac- 
count of the death of Assistant Chief 
Wolf, who lost his life in the perform- 
ance of duty. We quote: 

"Lying in three feet of water be- 
neath a narrow stairway which led 
from the main floor of Jensen and Com- 
pany's store to the basement below, 
the body of Assistant Fire Chief Rob- 
ert J. Wolf, who was suffocated in the 
fire which destroyed the Jones block, 
was found at 8 o'clock last night by a 
searching party of six firemen, headed 
by Chief William Metz. 

"The body was found about six feet 
to the rear of the foot of the stairs 
connecting the basement and the cen- 
tral portion of Jensen's store. It was 
face up and the head lying toward the 
south. The body was removed through 
the rear of the building and taken to 
the room occupied by the American 
Express office immediately across the 
alley from the destroyed building, 
where it remained until taken to Mac- 
Martin & Hill's undertaking rooms. 

How Assistant Chief Wolf entered 
the Jones building yesterday after- 
noon will probably never be known, as 
none of the firemen remember of hav- 
ing seen him after the arrival of No. 
2 department. 

"Chief William Metz was at Mc- 
Bride's livery stable at the time the 
alarm sounded and was one of the first 
men on the scene, He entered the 
area way on Alder stteet with the No. 
2 chemical hose and had succeeded in 



getting at the fire. In the basement 
he was met by men from No. 2 sta- 
tion, who entered the basement by 
way of the stairway under which As- 
sistant Chief Wolf's body was discov- 
ered. 

"Chief Metz stated this morning 
that as soon as the chemicals were 
thrown on the tire he saw that they 
would not be sufficient and ordered a 
line of hose brought through the Alder 
street area way. In the meantime 
Captain Guthridge had ordered a line 
of hose laid through the store and 
down the small stairway. Both these 
lines were laid, but water had no 
more than been turned on when the 
fire seemed to get additional draught 
and puffed out with such force that 
all the firemen were driven back to 
the first floor of the building. Chief 
Metz and the men from No. 2 station 
succeeded in reaching Alder street 
with ease, but the men beating a re- 
treat to the first floor of the building 
were nearly entrapped. Lieutenant 
Davis became confused and entangled 
in one of the lines of hose and was 
lii'ought out by Chief Metz, who re- 
turned to the basement in answer to 
his calls for help. Davis was nearly 
overcome by smoke. 

It is the general supposition that 
while Chief Metz was entering the 
building from the Alder si reel side and 

Captain Guthridge I'm m the Sec 1 

street side, thai A:.- ■ . taut Chief Wolf 
entered from the alley by way of a 
rear door which h ads intoa small base- 
ment stairway. It is (bought thai he 
descended this stairway and seeking 
the seat of the lire met with the hoi 
blast of smoke and air, which drove 



the other men from the basement. He 
evidently fell to his knees and was try- 
ing to reach the stairway leading to 
the first floorof the building, up which 
Captain Guthridge's men had fled, 
when he became overcome. 

"When found the body was badly 
burned and scalded. The face and 
hands were charred beyond recogni- 
tion and the body scalded by hot water 
which had fallen upon it from the heat- 
ed timbers. 

Assistant Chief Wolf, who was 46 
years of age, and who has been con- 
nected with the Walla Walla fire de- 
partment for a period of 20 years, was 
born in Los Angeles, Cal., in 1866. 
He came to the Walla Walla valley, in 
company with his brothers and sisters, 
in 1882, and has lived here practically 
ever since, with the exception of one 
year and a half, which he spent in 
Alaska. 

"He is survived by a niece. Wanda, 
aged 13, who lives at Baker, and three 
sisters— Mrs. S. Pelkey of Baker, Ore- 
gon; Mrs. Charles Clapp of California 
and Miss Clara Wolf of this city. A 
brother, Ben Wolf, died in August, 
1910, while another brother, Francis, 
died several months before." 

Bringhurst Allowed to Take Examination. 

Below is the wail of the Seattle Times 
of January 2, the paper that backed 
the Gill administration, which wa 
called February. L911. The simple 
fact is thai Bringhursl is no lo 
blacklisted. It says: 

"Harry W. Bringhurst. former chief 
of the Seattle Fire department, who 

was removed For cause bj Mayor 
Hiram ( '. Gill, whose charges were 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



sustained by the Civil Service Com- 
mission, will be allowed to take the 
civil service examination for the posi- 
tion of fire marshal in violation of the 
rules of the commission. This privi- 
lege was extended to Bringhurst last 
night by the two commissioners ap- 
pointed by Mayor George W. Billing— 
Chauncey L. Baxter and R. C. Erskine 
— who shut their eyes during the pro- 
ceedings to the rule which prescribes 
that no person shall be deemed eligible 
to take a civil service examination who 
has been dismissed from the public 
service for good cause. 

Erskine explained that he did not 
regard the causes for which Bring- 
hurst was removed as good ones, while 
Baxter excused his action by declaring 
that, in his opiuion, Bringhurst would 
make an ideal fire marshal, and that 
he did not regard the charges against 
him as any bar in view of the fact that 
Mayor Dilling had appointed Bring- 
hurst to the position for which he de- 
sires now to take the examination. 
Commissioner George P. Listman, the 
oldest member of the commission, op- 
posed the action of his colleagues in 
violating one of the cardinal rules of 
the commission. 

"The forgetf ulness of Baxter and 
Erskine was of short duration, both of 
them voting to reject the application 
of Joseph Latham to take the same ex- 
amination, Listman voting with them 
to uphold the rules of the commission. 
Latham was a captain in the depart- 
ment for several years and was re- 
moved in 1906. Charges against him 
were sustained. Bringhurst was chief 
of the department and was removed 
in 1910, and charges against him were 
sustained by the commission. 

"Mayor Dilling evidenced a higher 
regard for the civil service rules and 
regulations than the men whom he ap- 
pointed to enforce such rules, by fail- 
ing to appoint Bringhurst as chief of 
the fire department after his attention 
had been called to the rule which was 
set aside for a brief five minutes last 
night. Bringhurst was Dilling's choice 
for chief, but this bar was encountered 
and the appointment went elsewhere. 
Then Bringhurst was appointed fire 
marshal; one change was made by Dill- 
ing in the personnel of the commission 
and Bringhurst is now given the right 



to take an examination. 

"Just a week ago the commission al- 
lowed Bringhurst to file his application 
for the examination, several days after 
the lists had been closed. Last night 
the commission rejected the applica- 
tion of two members of the police de- 
partment who claimed to have not been 
advised as to the final date of filing ap 



been installed. One is the property of 

the school district. The other belongs 
to the Crockett-Valona fire district. 

Vallejo has installed a new fire alarm 
system, with a central transmitter at 
the police station. An alarm turned 
in at the police station will register the 
proper box. 

Driver John R. Code of the Alameda 



plications for promotion examinations, fire department, stationed at the Sher- 
The commission in rejecting these ap- J man street fire house, slipped and 
plications intimated that it was the j threw his right shoulder out of place, 
duty of the policemen to know such He is certainly out of luck, having met 
things. 

"Bringhurst, who is 51 years old, will 
participate in the benefits of the pen- 
sion fund, in event he passes the writ- 
ten and physical examinations, but 
will not be entitled to a pension on half 
pay until he has served in the depart- 
ment for twenty years. 

"J. G. Nehrhas, who was a captain 
in the fire department until 1905, when 

he resigned, is also an applicant for A press dispatch from Chicago says: 
the examination for fire marshal, and with the fires of three days yet to be 
his application has been accepted. 



with a similar accident at a fire a few 
months ago. 

The fire engines of Eureka have been 
kept busy during the past week pump- 
ing water out of flooded basements. 
In one theatre the orchestra was driven 
j from its pit by water rising through 

the floor. 

January a Bad Month for Fires. 



News of the Bay Cities. 



A small firein the Home of the Adult 
Blind at Thirty-sixth and Telegraph 
avenue created quite a commotion 
among the inmates. The fire was 
caused by oil leaking from a distillate 
stove. The attendants extinguished 
the flames before the fire department 
arrived. 

The Board of Fire Commissioners of 
Haywards have recommended that or- 
dinances be passed prohibiting the 
burning of rubbish in back yards in 
the business section of the town, that 
the merchants be required to store 
gasoline, coal oil, etc. in fire-proof 
buildings, and that a law be passed en- 
forcing the placing of fire extinguish- 
ers in all public buildings where people 
gather. 

Fire Commissioner Crosby of Hay- 
wards has resigned, stating that his 
public duties were interfering with his 
private affairs. 

Three fires in one day, two of which 
were of a mysterious origin, kept tin 
Richmond fire department on the jump 
last week. The total loss amounted to 
$6,000. The authorities are investi- 
gating these mysterious fires to deter- 
mine if a firebug is at work in the city. 
Crockett has accepted its new fire 
house and two chemical engines have 



included in the count, the month of 
January has already set a record, ac- 
cording to the number of fires. The 
month has been the coldest in the his- 
tory of the city, and there has been 
more than one-sixth as many fires as 
there were in the entire year of 1911. 
The number last night stood at 2085. 
Three different days have shown great- 
er number than July 4 last, which 
broke all previous records with 155. 
In one hour on January 5 there were 



Fire has been caused by rain at En- 
nis railway station recently. 

At West I lare a railway wagon con- 
taining some unslacked lime was <t 
on fire by rain, the flames spread to 
some near-by wagons containing other 
goods, and all were completely de- 
stroyed. 

"I suppose, Eileen," she remarked 
to the new girl, with feigned indiffer- 
ence, "that you overheard my husband 
snd me conversing rather earnestly 
this morning. I hope, however, that 
you did not think anything (mutual 
was going on?" "Niver a bit, mum, 
Oi wanst had a husband meself, an' 
niver a day passed that th' neighbors 
did't belave one or th' other uv us 
would be killed entoirly. " 

Subscribe for the Pacific Fireman 



1' A i : 1 F 1 C 



FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

"Salvation Nell," with Evelyn 
Vaughan in the title part, will he the 
Alcazar's offering' next Monday night 
and throughout the week. This "di- 
vine drama of the slums" is to be pre- 
sented in response to popular request. 
When she last appeared as Nell, about 
two years ago, in the Sutter street Al- 
cazar, the clever leading woman cre- 
ates' an impression that is responsible 
for the coming revival. That the per- 
formance as a whole will be superior 
to the previous one is confidently pre- 
dicted, for Bertram Lytell is cast for 
Jim Piatt, a character in which he 
scored one of his biggest hits in the 
East, and a stage of greater depth, 
width and height affords opportunity 
for more elaborate settings, especially 
the Bowery bar-room interior and the 
tenement alley. Edward Sheldon 
wrote "Salvation Nell," and Mrs. 
Fiske made it fit for stage use. It is 
a chapter of life from the New York 
underworld, and the realism of that 
life is maintained with marvelous fidel- 
ity from first to final curtain. 

Empress Theatre. 

Heading the new bill, opening with 
the matinee Sunday afternoon, will be 
one of the most important single acts 
in vaudeville and one of the strongest 
attractions to play the Sullivan and 
Considine tour— Arturo Bemardi. 
Bernardi makes thirty-five different 
changes of costume in twenty minutes. 
An important return engagemtnl over 
the circuit is that of Miss Ray Dooley 
and her Metropolitan Minstrels. For 
speed and dexterity, there are few 
acrobats in the country who can excel 
the Todd Nards. Circus— Budd .-hi! 
Clare, continental favorites — burlesque 
various London ideas and introduce a 
number of songs, dances and instru- 
mental selections in an act entitled 
"Scenes at a London Ball." Ten thor- 
oughbred English hull (le^s appear in 
one of the acts on the new hill. Mer- 
lin, world's greatest card manipulator, 
has them all left at the post when il 
comes to artisticness, dexterity and 
classiness in handling cards. The Wal- 
lace Troubadours, in operatic selec- 
tions, and Garrrod and Garrod, jin- 
gling comedians, will round out the hill. 

Subscribe for the Pacific Fikkman 



. . . Where Gorham Auto Fire Engines are Made 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 




GORHAM ENGINEERING AND FIRE APPARATUS CO. 



SEATTLE 
216 Jackson Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 

48 Fremont Street 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 S. Olive Street 



American Rubber iWfg. Co. 



9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories — Park Avenue and Watt Street. Oakland, Cal. 

WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 

Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose, Brass 
Goods, Vcdves and All Fire Department Supplies 

Eureka Fire Hose iWfg. Co. 




WE ARE: LEADERS IN THE JVlAINLIRACTtjRE OR 

FIRE DEPARTMENT HOSE 



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EUREKA FIRE HOSE MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

SO-r.o PRBMONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

\v. ,\. DAOQETT, - - - Pacific Coast Mananr 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 




PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 
BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 



Editorial Rooms and Business Office, 479 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 



Entered as second-class matter Match 21, 1908, a1 thfl 
Postoffice at San Francisco. Cal., under the Act of Con- 
" of March 3. 1879. 



SATURDAY FEBRUARY 10. 1912 



A recommendation that the city issue 
$1,000,000 worth of bonds for new engine 
houses and their equipment was laid before 
the Board of Supervisors last week. 

An exchange says Eddie Wolf, head of the 
"Fight Trust" in San Francisco, and a State 
Senator in California, also holds the office of 
Municipal Horseshoer of the Bay City. 

President Brandenstein of the Fire Commis- 
sion says Chief Murphy is now the real head 
of the fire department and discipline is to be 
maintained by him alone. This is as it should 
be. It, was not always thus. 



It is reported that when firemen got deep 
into the ruins of the Equitable building in New 
York City they found a guinea pig that had 
lived 16 days without food. It squealed with 
delight when rescued. It is now a firemen's 
mascot. 

Hackensack, Texas, has a new fire chief 
who bears the name of A. Brykezynski. 
Some foreman say the Improvement Commis- 
sion will never confirm the election of Bryke- 
zynski unless he takes a few consonants out 
of his name. 



Abrams, the tailor, rather than face proba- 
ble imprisonment for a term of years for his 
confessed attempt, to set fireto his three-story 
flat apartments at 2300 Franklin street Janu- 
ary 23, shot himself through the head in his 
b idroom last week. 



Fire Marshal Towe believes that Ben Garki, 
who was arrested at an early hour last Sun- 
day morning, as he was about to fire the cot- 
tage of a countryman of his at 519 Hickory 
avenue, has operated in many other coast 
cities and his record is now being investigated 
with a view to explaining numerous incendi- 
ary fires under insurant 

"Many of the citizens of Petaluma," says 
the Courier, "cann.it afford to go into debt 
at this time for any new fangled and ex- 
pensive apnaratus for fire protection. It is to 
such good taxpayers we would appeal in rea- 
son. The very last of all economies is to ham- 
per the firemen. It is idle to quote history 
of the awful conflagrations of the past. We 
have had holocausts enough here in California. 
If money is not available at once arrange- 
ments should be made to guarantee it and 
equip the fire crews in the very best shape. 
It. is the pride they have in their work that 
makes them dare to d.i what others are not 
brave enough to do. Help them and let us 
insure ourselves for the future." 



Civil Service vs. Spoil System. 

Whether or not all the statements in the 
following paragraphs from the editorial col- 
umns of a local daily are true as applied to 
other departments of the city government, a 
great majority of fire chiefs of this county 
will testify, to some extent, that the points 
in these paragraphs are well taken when it 
comes to a question of the fire department. 
We quote: 

"As hitherto administered, the civil service 
laws, so far from promoting economy and effi- 
ciency, have had actually the contrary effect. 
The one and only virtue of the so-called 
"merit" system, when honestly administered, 
is to remove control of subordinate positions 
from political bosses. 

"The vice of the system is the unnecessary 
multiplication of jobs. Few die and none re- 
sign from these plums, and the pressure 
to attach oneself to the treasury grows 
stronger every year. A class feeling grows 
up within the service, resulting in a concert 
of influence to create conditions under which 
each person shall do as little as possible. 

"In the Federal service that situation is em- 
phasized by the fact that the system has now 
been so iongin force that the higher positions 
are very largely filled by superannuates who 
cannot do their work. To a great extent their 
work is done by men in the lower grades, with 
less compensation and small hope of promo- 
tion." 

Another local paper editorialy says: 

"Business administrations like other ad- 
ministrations have their friends, and those 
friends get the plumsof municipal jobs. The 
McCarthy administration liberally tossed out 
the Taylor administration appointees and the 
Rolph administration throws out the McCar- 
thy appointees. Of course it's all done under 
the name of 'house cleaning,' but the spoils 
system is a pretty sure thing to count on 
whoever gets into office 

"Maybe the new administration can get a 
higher efficiency by putting its friends into 
municipal jobs than in retaining the old, and 
maybe it can't. That remains to be deter- 
mined. But it is the natural course of poli- 
tics at any rate. 'To the victors belong the 
spoils.'" 



Aged People Saved From Flames. 

A fire was discovered in the St. Catherine's 
Home and Training School, corner 21st street 
and Potrero avenue, about 7 o'clock last Mon- 
eay morning, and owing to the bravery and 
presence of mind of the sisters, who conduct 
the school, the crippled aged inmates who oc- 
cupy the home annex were saved from death 
by suffocation during the blaze. The fire 
started in a bathroom in the north wing of 
the building, and before the sisters could as- 
semble in response to the alarm this room and 
the bedroom of one of the inmates adjoining 
adjoining it was in flames, and the aged women, 
many of whom were unable to walk without 
assistance, were making vain attempts to es- 
cape. 

One sister was sent to notify the fire de- 
partment, and thegirls in the dormitory above 



and all others set to work to bodily carry their 
helpless charges from the burning building, 
with the result that by the time the fire de- 
partment had come the few blocks from their 
station at Twenty-fifth snd Utah streets all 
the inmates with one exception were out of 
the building. This old lady, weighing over 
250 pounds, the sisters were not able to carry, 
and she was borne in the arms of three burly 
firemen to safety. No one was injured as a 
result of the panic. 

The 120 young girls who occupied the dor- 
mitory on the second floor of the flaming 
wing had just completed their morning toilets 
preparatory to attending the morning chapel 
services, when the alarm was given. The 
sister in charge ordered them into the fire- 
drill order, and they filed quietly down the 
steps to safety. 

Reminiscences of the Los Angeles Fire 
Department. 

BY PERCY "KID" WILLIAMS. 

Los Angeles has its heroes in the fire depart- 
ment and men that have done little acts of 
heroism as well as any other large city in the 
United States, but it is very seldom that any 
act of heroism is brought before the public's 
eye that some member of the Los Angeles 
Fire Department has performed. 

I know of several brave and daring acts of 
men that I worked with had done and not a 
word was mentioned or any medals for brav- 
ery were handed out, but nevertheless were 
carried out unconsciously of praise or fame 
that they deserved and should have received. 

Take the case of Billie Tibbirts. Billie was 
an engineer in the department stationed at en- 
gine 3, Second and Hill streets, and no better 
or braver boy lived. It was supper hour one 
afternoon, about three years ago, the driver 
of the engine, Tom Fernandez, was off and 
also several of the boys, when the gong rang, 
and as the tape came in it showed that it was 
a run for our company. The three big grays 
that pulled the engine ran out of their stalls 
to their places under the harness and were 
hitched, waiting impatiently and anxiously to 
be off and going. The boys that hitched them 
forgot Tom was to supper and jumped on the 
hose wagon without as much as seeing if the 
driver of the engine was on his seat and con- 
sequently left no one to drive. 

Tibbirts jumped on his engine as it start- 
ed and he even did not know that the engine 
was without a driver, but the horses knew, 
and, true to their natural instinct, followed 
the wagon out of the house and started on a 
dead wild gallop down the street. They had 
gone about a block over car tracks, passing 
vehicles and people on the street when Billie 
noticed the rocking and swaying of the engine 
was becoming dangerous, and as be looked 
from behind to the seat on the engine he no- 
ticed that the horses had the bits in their 
mouths and were dashing madly and furiously 
along, without anyone to guide them, but at 
the same time following the hose wagon. 
Tibbirts knew there was only one thing t<> be 
done and that was to get control of the reins. 
So, as they dashed along, threatneing every 



moment to turn the engine over and perhaps 
killing: people and themselves, Tibbirts com- 
menced climbing from his place behind the 
engine to the driver's seat. Those who wit- 
nessed him as he clung- along over the engine 
told me it was one of the greatest pieces of 
nerve and coolness that they had ever heard 
of or ever saw. 

He finally got the reins in his hands and had 
hardly got the wild mad horses under his con- 
trol when a street car passed him, just miss- 
ing him a few feet. Think of what might 
have happened if he had not stopped them 
when hedid, or if he had been crushed beneath 
the engine in this, its wild dash, down the 
avenue. Men likeBillieareborn-not made- 
and still very few people knew that this grand 
piece of heroism was ever done or even 
thought of. 

Why, I have seen men fighting fire that 
thought nothing of their own lives; they 
didn't even give themselves a thought, but 
worked desperately and savagely to save 
some life that might be in peril. I've seen 
them risk their skins, scarred and burned 
hair burned off their heads, eyelids and lashes 
gone and still keep on fighting the flames of 
the devil, and when someone spoke to them 
ami told them to take a rest or a bit of fresh 
air their only answer would he a laugh. All 
these things, in mv opinion, are bravery and 
worthy of mention. I've seen men go i„i„ 
certain death in a blaze of fire and smoke, 
with the grim determination to win or die. 

Poor old Tommic Holmes, who has since 
gone to the land of sunshine and happiness 
was one of the bravest boys that ever drew a 
breath. Nothing seemed to stop him- he 
never knew what fear was. He was always 
first to go. and he would never send a man 
where he wouldn't go himself. Tom used to 
saj that fire couldn't burn him, becausee he 
could eai all the fire that was in his way and 
as for smoke, why he just brushed that aside 
II,- fell down a poll-hole one night and he 

never r vered consciousness. His funeral 

was oneof ib- grandest and biggest that ever 
a true, brave fire-fighter received in the world 
The offerings of sympathy to his family and 
the (lowers were so numerous that it took six 
express wagons to carry them to bis grav,. 
1 h y should have given bin, the flowers while 
be lived. May In, soul t-esi i„ eternal pea,-,.. 
(To In' continued next week 

The Policaman's Ball. 

Tl "' policeman'* ball for the benefit of the 
Widows' and Orphans' Association will beheld 
'" the Coliseum February I.",. According i„ 
arrangements, the committee states, a much 
greater attendance than ever before is ex- 
pected, There has been 20,000 tickets issued 
■■""I they are going "like hot cake " it i, ,. 
Ported, Mayor Rolph will lead .be grand 
march. Ii issaid manyoi the "bravest" will 

X,' " h ',"" to ma ,,i unabetwee 

the .-ops and their first annual ball held last 
I hanksgivn v.' 

Blackstone's postulate was that for everv 

wrong here is B sufflc , and conv, 

, "" , " llv,n thelaw.bul Blackstonehadbadno 
experience in American courts, 



„ 2A C . 1F g F1R EM A N 
San Francisco Fire Commissioners. 

At the regular meeting of the Board of 
Fire Commissioners held Thursday, February 
8, 1912, at 5:30 p. m. (all members being pres- 
ent) the following business was transacted: 

Communication from the Gorham Engineer- 
ing and Fire Apparatus Company, requesting 
permission to assign the contract for one 
motor propelled city service truck to the Sea- 
grave Company of Columbus, Ohio. Laid over 

Opinion from the City Attorney in the mat- 
ter of the bids for motor driven delivery 
trucks. 

Complaint against George Knorp, foreman 
machinist. Reprimand. 

Complaint against Joseph Meader, driver 
monitor battery number 1. Ordered trans- 
ferred. 

REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE 
Petition of William Taaffe Tanning Com- 
pany for the installation of a fire alarm box 
at the corner of Revere avenue and Griffith 
street. Referred to chief engineer to make 
the necessary recommendation. 

Application from Joseph Capelli, captain 
chemical 4, to be allowed salary on account of 
a sprained shoulder received while hitching a 
horse at the quarters of his company on Jan- 
uary 4, 1912. Allowed salary. 

Application from John T." Hayes, hoseman 
engine 15, for salary on account of injury to 
foot while working at a fire on January 25 
1912. Allowed salary. ' 

Report, from drill master Captain Cullen 
submitting a list of probationary members 
who have been satisfactorily passed upon at 
the drill school. Approved and ordered en- 
tered as the official rating of such members. 
From the Civil Service Commission, direct- 
ing that the title of Thomas Buckley be 
changed upon the records from hoseman to 
hamessmaker, and that it be advised of any 
other similar cases in the department. Re- 
ferred to the chief engineer to take up with 
the president of theCivil Service Commission 
Communication from the Richmond Central 
Improvement Club for the immediate installa- 
tion of more and better fire protection for the 
Richmond district. Filed, 

Communication from 6. L. Borghero, truck- 
man truck 1. requesting Unit be be granted a 
leave of absenee for six months, withoul pay 

Denied. 

Report of chief engineer having assigned 
W. P. Simmons from hoseman engine L':i to 
operati r nf battalion 4, Mr,. J, „ es Ward, re- 
ascignrd toengine24 as hoseman. Approved 

Recommendation of the i I , er that 

,h " Department of Electricity be requested to 
in ,a 'l the following lire alarm boxes: Box 

559 al Twenty second and Verm 

" '"■' ll Revere avi nueand Jennini treel 

Bo * " !:; ' hanged from Reve i ave 

ami Hawes street to Revi re av. nueand Gril 
fith street. Approved and so orden d 

1 '"" ii ication From John Murphy, hose 

' relief engine I. tendering his resignal 

1 member of thi d< partmi tit, to I il 
from February I, 1912. Accepted. 

Communicatioi m G, i .. Borghero, truck- 



man truck 1, tendering his resignation as a 
member of the department, to take effect 
February 1, 1912. Accepted. 

Application of Peter Gallagher, lieutenant 
chemical 11, for salary on account of a rupture 
alleged to have been received by being thrown 
from hose wagon of engine 32, while respond- 
ing to an alarm of fire on October 21, 1908. 
Referred to chief engineer for investigation 
and report. 

Recommendation of chief engineer for the 
purchaseof the following amountsof firehose: 
7,500 feet of 2£-inch cotton fire hose, 2,500 
feet of 1^-inch cotton fire hose. Approved, 
and the chief engineer directed to have speci- 
fications prepared with a view to advertising 
for bids. 

Also recommending that the necessary steps 
be taken with a view to establishing a new 
rank and position in the department, to be 
known and designated as third assistant chief 
engineer, with an annual salary of $2,850. 
The object for this position is that a third 
general division of the department may be es- 
tablished, as the divisions under the charge of 
the first and second assistant chief engineers 
are entirely too large in' area to be covered 
effectively, and it will involve an additional 
expense yearly of but $150, as the place will 
be filled by the temporary promotion of a 
batallion chief, thus reducing the number of 
batallion chiefs by one. Approved and so or- 
dered. 

Communications from Patrick Haggerty, 
truckman truck 3, tendering his resignation 
as a member of the department, to take effect 
from February 1. 1912. Accepted. 

Onr genial friend Lieutenant Ed Kehoe 
made this office a pleasant call last Tuesday. 

Don't Knock! We know as well as anybody 
that the Pacific Fireman is not the best it 
could be made. We know that it could be 
made much better if it hail the patronage it 
deserves and should have. Twice the num- 
ber of subscribers would enable us to make 
ten times the improvement. 

The following society item is published at 
the request of a member of engine 2: Mrs. 
A. Meyer announces the eiigngi motit of her 
daughter. Miss Hilda, to Joseph Barskey. 

Miss Meyer i Mr. Barskey will receive on 

the afternoon of the 18th inst. from 2 o'clock 
to •"' at 316 Los ' tlivos avenue. 

The sale recent l.\ adverti ed bj R. Riznik 
for the month of February bus brought him 
so much business already this month that he 
is planning to put on extra hi Ip to handle thi 
tradi and i to send i ul an extra 

wagon to deliver the phone orders. He in 
formed a representative the othei 

" lad ■ ■ i hat ! ppreciate 

a good thing when thev I 

A fellow who claims to know sayt that tele- 
phone gii I make the best wivi . II. 
hey gel into the habit of hearii e kic! 
growls and at- mpelled to keep thi ir 

1 hs In: ,,|, B ant, letting It. 

other fellow do all the talking and they at 
different from the n Bt ol thai il he 

was in the market hi 'd make a break for the 

ti l«| l dice forthw ith I oi 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 2,2nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention aivi n to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Design • 

Gardening, Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Reach Nurseries, take Castro street car to 23rd. or 

Mission, 24th street and HofFman avenue car 

to Douelass and 24th streets. 



EAGLESON & CO. 

1158 MARKET ST. 

PHONE MARKET 5417 

MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS 



Phone Horn; C 2458 



Lamanet Bros. 

Is the place of all places to get the 
very latest and best in the way of 

FIREMEN'S REGULATION SHIRTS 
FIREMEN'S TURNOUT SUITS 
GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS 
HATS & UNDERWEAR, ETC. 

524 BROADWAY STREET 

SAIN FRANCISCO 



AND SHIRTS 

Guaranteed Navy Flannel Firemen's 
Shirts 

alto I 12 South Spring Street, Los Angela 



Gold and Silver Trimminprs. All Kinds of Gold Embroider- 
ing Dune to Order. 

Telephone Douglas 2600 

BLOOM BROS. Inc. 

HAT AIND CAP FACTORY 

M ilitary and Nao' Caps a Specially 

109 NEW MONTGOMERY ST., SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 




FIREMEN EAT AT THE 

...B. &. D. RESTAURANT... 

Where you get the best for the least money. 
M. O. DALBEV. Msr. 

178 THIRD ST., San Francisco 

OPEN TILL MIDNIGHT. Phone Doutjlas 2Mi; 



\A/M. F. EGAN 

M. R. C. V. S. 

..VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D.. 



1155 GOLDEN GATE AYE. 
Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal 

M L. MILCOVICH. Prop. 

Martin's Restaurant and Grill 

1533 STEINER STREET 

Near Gearv ^an Frand«cn 



Policemen Attention! 

are you going to the 

BALL? 

GET YOUR DRESS SUIT 

AT 

SELIX 
RENTAL PARLORS 

54 MASON STREET 

NEAR MARKET 



National Guard and Society Uniforms a Specialty 

CALIFORNIA UNIFORM 

AND — 

TAILORING COMPANY 

MARCUS LAFEE. Prop. 
WE MAKE SUITS TO ORDER FROM $30 UP 

287 O'FARRELL ST. Bel. Powell and Maion 



„, I Douglas 3770 
Phones , Hom( . c }7J0 



I Francisco. Cal. 



Phone Market 1795 



Home J 1795 



JOE. H. ROSENBERG 

ffiiiiU anu {Hilitarji ilaiU.r 

73 ELLIS ST . . Neat Powell 

Louis Frankenberg, formerly with Rosenblum & Abraham. Manager 



Telephone Douglas 287 I 



Home C 4992 



WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRANT BROKERS 
630 KEARNY STREET 




DRESS SLITS RENTED 



All Occasions 



COR. COMMERCIAL 



SAN FRANCISCO 



l_. SKOLL 

305 KEARNY ST. 

Phones Kearny 2280 Home C 6323 



The Little Emporium 

L. RIZNIC Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 
2296 -98 CiEARY STREET 

Near Broderick 
Telephone West 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 

The teleph perators In New York City 

handle 180,000 calls every rush hour. They will 

connect you with any oue ol .' ,000 Bubscri 

In h.i ii a minute. 

Ask the exchange manage, bow he can handle 
all these calls, and he will tell you tersely, "By 
saving the seconds " 

"Schedule time" is the keynote of Amei 
indusi i ■>-. Tliut means Howard time Th< 
always Bomebody higher up holding a Howard 
Wat< h on the Job— ^-demanding the Howard I 
ol accuracy and punctuality. 

The Howard is the "iie watch In the world 
wholly adapted t<> modern progress, it 
i tie pi e. Isi consti m tion and the scientific ad- 
justment 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pay for It. 

The price oi each watch— from the 17-Jewel 
(double roller) In a Crescent Extra or -las. Muss 
Extra gold-filled case al (40. t<> the 23-jewel at 
(150, and the Edward Howard model at $350 — 
is fixed at thi rid b printed ticket at- 

tached. 

Find the Howard jeweler in your town and 
talk to him. Not every jeweler can sell you a 
Howard. The jeweler who can Is a good man 

■ 

Admiral Sij written a little b 

"The Log Of the Howard Watch." giving the 

of his own Howard In the U. S. 
Y"- : '.i enjoy It. Drop us a post-card, Dept X. 
and we'll send you a copy. 
HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston. Mass. 

T. H^KILGO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 
71 WALLER ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 

SALVAR 

( I Will Save ) 

The Greatest BLOOD REMEDY in (he World 

WILL CURE 

RHEUMATISM 

Acute or Chronic 



BLOOD POISON 

Acquired or Hereditary 

PARALYSIS 
CATARRH 

MALARIA 



Diseases of Liver, Kidneys and Bladder 
Diseases Peculiar to Women 



$10.0(1 FOR 40 TO 60 DAYS' TREATMENT 

Call or Write for our 100 Page Booklet 

TOJHE PUBLI C 

In offering Salvar to the public, we do so 
with perfect confidence, and state publicly our 
willingness to have our remedy thoroughly tested 
in any fair and equitable manner, in the treat- 
ment of all diseases we claim it will relieve, and 
we will abide by a decision so given and dis- 
continue its sale at once if it is found different in 
any particular from what it is represented to be. 

SEITZ & MILLS, Agents 
1402 Market St., near 10th, San Francisco 




VOL. IX.-NO. 7. 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17. 1912. 



Single Copies 5 cents. 



Life-Saving Auto Latest Fire Apparatus. 

The latest motor fire apparatus to be 
put onto the market is a life-saving 
car made by the Knox Automobile 
Company of Springfield, Mass. The 
car embodies the latest improvements 
in rescuing apparatus, and its squad 
will be trained to meet all conditions 
and be able to apply the means for re- j 
viving people who have been partly 
suffocated. The car has a 48-horse- 
power, four-cylinder motor, mounted 
on a strong chassis of standard Knox 
construction throughout. 

The body has been specially designed 
to give the maximum carrying space 
for men and equipment. In the cen- 
ter, folded in compact upright form, 
is the life net, with room between 
the net and the seats for the men to 
stand. A folding stretcher is also pro- 
vided, which can be placed between 
the seats and the net frame, on either 
side, for emergency use. The remain- 
ing equipment of the car consists of 
three pompier scaling ladders, placed 
over the life net in the center of the 
car, two three-gallon hand extinguish- 
ers, a smoke helmet, an oxygen respir- 
ator for use in cases of partial smoke 
suffocation, and an assortment of spe- 
cial fire tools, a medical outfit, etc. 
The body has lockers, with hinged lids, 
similar to those now in use on the new 
combination cars, extending along each 
side under the scats. In these the 
men keep their rubber boots, coats and 
other special articles of clothing, so 
that they can dress on the way to the 
fire, saving valuable time. 

It is equipped with pneumatic tires, 
single on the front wheels and dual 
on the rear, and is capable of a maxi- 



mum speed of forty miles an hour, 
which will enable it to reach a fire in 
any part of the city in a few minutes. 
It will answer all alarms, and in addi- 
tion to acting as a life-saving car can 
carry ten or twelve men, if necessary, 
for auxiliary purposes. The particu- 
lar purpose of the car, however, will 
not be the fighting of fires nor the car- 
rying of extra forces for this, but will 
be the saving of life only. 

So efficient an equipment should rob 
the higher buildings of many of their 
top-story dangers. The quick spread 
of fires which often shuts people off in 
the upper floors of buildings and forces 
them to jump from high windows or 
to take other desperate measures for 
escape is now provided against. — 
American Motor News. 

Meeting Veteran Firemen's Association. 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
association was held Tuesday, Febru- 
ary 6. All of the officers and directors 
and a large number of members were 
noted present. The following were 
reported still sick: Comrades Chas. 
Bell, Con Mooney, Thos. Mahoney, 
John Hayes and S. G. Drummond. 
Their condition about same as when 
last reported. The uniform committee 
made a progressive report. A com- 
mittee, consisting of Comrades A. II. 
Leaf, Jas. E. Britt, Thos. Coogan, W. 
1). Waters and S. Baker, was appoint- 
ed to arrange for the L3th annual pic- 
nic. The routine business was rapidly 
disposed of and a card contest inaug- 
urated. At 11 p. m. the meeting ad- 
journed. 

Chief G. Mine)-. National City, has 
prepared plans for a lire alarm system. 



Discipline at Omaha. 

The time-honored custom of haling 
members of the Omaha, Neb., fire de- 
partment before the Board of Fire and 
Police Commissioners for tardiness in 
reporting for duty, no matter whether 
it is but a minute or half an hour, may 
soon be abolished. 

Commissioner Hunter, at a meeting 
of the board, took the position that it 
does the firemen no good to bring them 
up before the board for an offense so 
trivial as a moment's tardiness, and it 
has the effect of making the men bit- 
ter toward the captains forced to re- 
port them. He advocated that all 
cases where men are less than ten or 
fifteen minutes late be reported to 
Chief Salter, who may use his judg- 
ment in dealing with them. More 
serious cases, where an hour or so is 
involved, could be taken before the 
board. 

The matter was brought up as the 
result of a captain filing charges 
against himself several weeks ago for 
being one minute late for duty. The 
matter was laid over until next week, 
but Chief Salter was called upon for 
his opinion, and he held that strict dis- 
cipline in a department so important as 
the fire-fighting force should be main- 
tained to the fullest degree. He was 
also of the opinion that many cases 
should be left to his captain's discre- 
tion, instead of bothering the I 
and humiliating the men, where the 
same result could lie obtained in a more 

satisfactory manner byother metfa 

Firemen's Herald. 

The firemen of Spokane, Wash., will 
ask an increase of $5, to bring their 
monthly compensation up to $1 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 






Death of Robert J. Wolf. 

The following- is an editorial which 
appeared in a recent issue of the Walla 
Walla Bulletin on the death of Robert 
J. Wolf, who lost his life in the per- 
formance of duty: 

To die in the performance of duty is 
heroism of the highest type. The pa- 
triots are not all on the field of battle. 
All that is needed is opportunity tore- 
veal that we touch elbows daily with 
men who are willing to meet death, 
even in being true to their daily task 



and the other to perform night service. 
The hours of day service must not ex- 
ceed ten, commencing not before 8 
o'clock in the morning and ending not 
later than 6 o'clock at night. The 
hours of night service must not exceed 
fourteen, commencing not before 6 
o'clock in the evening and ending not 
later than 8 o'clock in the morning. 
An exception is made that in cases of 
riot, serious conflagration or other 
emergency the head of the department 
shall have full discretion to assign all 



For twenty years Robert J. Wolf mem bers of^he department to eontin 
did what every fireman does— faced 
danger numberless times to protect the 
lives and property of Walla Walla peo- 
ple. His acquaintance was not large 
outside the circle of men with whom 
his work brought him in contact. He 
was always "on duty," waiting the 
"alarm" that at last called him to his 
death. Men called his an "obscure" 
position in life," but Robert J. Wolf ' exchange, has been introduced at 



uousduty. With this exception neither 
platoon shall be required to perform 
continuous day service or night service 
for a longer consecutive period than 
one week, except so far as may be 
necessary to equalize the hours of serv- 
ice between two platoons. Violation 
of the act is made a misdemeanor. 
A bill of similar nature, says an 



depends a promised reduction in the 
insurance rates. The appointment of 
the crews of the high-pressure salt 
water apparatus will also be subject 
to Civil Service requirements. 



Fight Flames and Snakes. 



S 



A dispatch from San Antonio, dated 
February 10, says: 

While copperheads, rattlers and ad- 
ders writhed over the floor, and taran- 
tulas and other poisonous insects dart- 
ed here and there, firemen to-day 
fought a blaze in the bird and snake 
store of W. 0. Learn. The reptiles 
became liberated when the streams of 
water shattered the boxes in which 
they were confined. Five hundred 
parrots were suffocated and 350 snakes 
were roasted. The financial loss was 
small. 



Alcazar Theatre. 



will henceforth be counted a patriot. 
But he is no more to be commended 
than the men who devote their lives, 
as did he, in the service of the city for 
its protection against fire. Theirs' is 
a hazardous life and we do not 
to appreciate the worth of the serv, 
they render. Yesterday, as 



every session for many years and on 



"Brewster's Millions," which is an- 
nounced as the Alcazar's magnet 




one occasion passed both branches of throughout the coming week, was 
the legislature, only to be vetoed by \ dramatized by Winchell Smith and By- 
the governor. j ron Ongley from George Barr Mc- 

\ ! Cutcheon's famous novel with similar 

High Pressure at Oakland. 4\| title, which held the prominence of a 

The matter of establishing the EIn>} "best seller" for months after its first 

hurst fire house and the fire house at ! publication. And since then neither 



they entertained no thought of rest! Tmrteentn avenue and Hopkins street j the book nor the play has much de- 
until the flames were under control with cal1 com P anies . and creating two teriorated in popularity. When last 
and none but men of fine calibre will Companies on fuU pay to handle the ! presented in the Alcazar, with Ber- 
do what they do when emergency calls Salt Water high P ressure wagons and t tram Lytell and Evelyn Vaughan in 
them. apparatus, the Oakland City Council : the leading 1 roles, the stage version ran 

The entire city mourns the death of haS autnorized the City Attorney to a fortnight and drew big audiences 
Mr. Wolf. Strong men wept yester- d,aW an ordinance creating thirty-one : until its final performance, 
day as they fought the fire, knowing new positions in tlle fire department In the revival, commencing next 
that their comrade was dead, and many ' The action was taken recently through j Monday evening. Mr. Lytell and Miss 
a man, as he watched them work tlle recommendat ' on 0I Commissioner Vaughan will have their previous roles, 
dropped a tear and a kind word f r i of Pubn 'c Health and Safety Fred C. he as "Monty" Brewster and sheas 



'Bob." There is a lesson for every 
one of us in his splendid self-sacrifice. 

New York's Two-Platoon Bill. 

Senator Dennis J. Harte, Long 
Island City, has introduced into the 
New York State Senate a bill provid- 
ing the two-platoon system for fire de- 
partments in first-class cities. 

The measure provides that on and 
after July 1, 1912, the commissioners 
of the department, or other officers 
having the direction of the fire forces 
of any city of the first class, must di- 
vide the membersof the force into two 
platoons, one to perform day service 



Turner. 

There is to be one captain, one lieu- 
tenant, five drivers, one stoker, one 
engineer, ten horsemen, two foremen, 
ten extra men. It is also the intention 
to put the Elmhurst company and the 
Thirteenth avenue firehouse on a call 
basis as soon as the said ordinance is 
passed, but will have to await classifi- 
cation of the men by the Civil Service ble - 
Commission. 

The establishment of the two com- 
panies in charge of the high pressure 
salt water system has been looked for- 
ward to for some time, as upon the 
placing of this system in full operation 



Peggy Gray, the girl who loves him. 
In the cast with Mr. Lytell and Miss 
Vaughan will be the full strength of 
the Alcazar company, and each of the 
four acts is to be artistically and elab- 
orately staged, especial pains being 
taken to make the third-act picture — 
the deck of an ocean yacht while a 
storm is raging— as realistic as ] ossi- 



The report for 1911, issued by Chief 
J. J. Marsh, Bellingham, Wash., is 
easily the best ever made for that city. 
It shows that 202 calls were answered 
for a total loss of $25,496. 16, as against 
$51,730.06 for 1910. 



P A C 1 FC FIREMAN 



Had He Only Known of Chief Bartlett. 

If Dr. Johnson had known our eru- 
dite and otherwise accomplished fire 
chief and street superintendent, Mr. 
George Bartlett, it is highly probable 
that our first dictionary would have 
been an entirely different affair. 

The compilation of the first diction- 
ary of a language is no small affair— it 
is so difficult to remember all the words. 
With the vocabulary at his command, 
Mr. Bartlett's assistance would have 
been invaluable to the hearty old Eng- 
lish lexicographer. 

A case in point: 

At the meeting of the city trustees 
Monday evening, February 5, Presi- 
dent Morse inquired of the superin- 
tendent of streets if a certain broken 
culvert had been repaired. 

"Condition has been amalgamated," 
the laconic official replied, with a wave 
of the hand as who should say: 
"Everything is alright." 

There was an audible silence lasting 
a full minute. Finally Trustee Hicks 
got his breath and asked respectfully, 
"what did you say, sir?" 

"A rendition of the obsequences has 
been obligated by a fragmentary dis- 
solution of the responsibities detach- 
able to the previous negotiations and 
the olfactory collusion is imminent to 
a hereditary ultimatum that is thor- 
oughly understood." 

Mr. Bartlett rattled off these sky- 
scrapers with an aplomb and urbanity 
that Dr. Johnson himself could not 
have surpassed. 

As for the board members, they just 
wilted. Hicks apologised for pressing 
the point; Powers turned helplessly to 
the press, but they could give him no 
comfort. 

"Did you get it?" asked Morse of 
Clerk Gordon. 

"Not in the minutes, " answered that 
cautious legal light. 

"The point's in jeopardy," O'Brien 
observed dryly, and the trustees are 
still wondering if that culvert has been 
repaired. They hadn't the nerve to 
pursue the inquiry, but passed on to 
other matters. 

Poor old Dr. Johnson! He never 
knew what he missed. He had his 
Boswell, but oh that he had had a 
Bartlett. —San Mateo Times. 



Where Gorham Auto Fire Engines are Made . . . 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 




GORHAM ENGINEERING AND FIRE APPARATUS CO. 



SEATTLE 
216 Jackson Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Street 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 S. Olive Street 



American Rubber Mfg. Co. 



9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories — Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 

WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 

Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose, Brass 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Department Supplies 



Tire 
with 



Fisk 



When you 
tire of risk 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 




PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

Tu whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manacer 



Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street. 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 



Entered as second-class matter March 21. 1908. at the 
Postofhce at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress ..f Marcfa ; 



SATURDAY FEBRUARY 17. 1912 



President Brandenstein of the Fire Com- 
mission favors asking; the Board of Supervis- 
ors to set aside funds saved from the reduc- 
tion of the salary roll to purchase lots and 
construct new engine houses. 

A dispatch says Vienna has a motor-driven 
machine which is a fire engine, a street 
sweeper, a street sprinkler and a simple six- 
ton truck at the same time. Might be good 
idea for our city to investigate it. 

The fire which destroyed the Equitable 
building in New York City recently was caused 
by a "safety" match. During the excitement 
three firemen were run over by the wagon of 
the "Mercy and Help" department. 

Percy "Kid" Williams, author of "Remi- 
niscences of the Los Angeles Fire Depart- 
ment," which has been running as a serial in 
this paper, is laid tip with a bad cold, hence 
it is omitted this week, but will appear in fol- 
lowing issues. 



combined with the American Motor News. 
It contains 32 pages and a handsome cover. 
It is copiously illustrated and is replete with 
the latest motor news from all sections of the 
country. The liberal advertising extended to 
it gives evidence of keen appreciation of its 
value as an advertising medium by dealers in 
automobiles, etc. We predict a successful fu- 
ture for it. 



A representative of the Seagrave Auto Fire 
Apparatus Company was in Petaluma recent 
ly, discussing with Chief Adams and Mayor 
Zartman the advisability of purchasing auto 
fire apparatus for that city. The Courier is 
very much in favor of it and urged the coun- 
cil to take some action in the matter. 



Fire alarm call bells are to he installed in 
barber shops in Oakland, in the vicinity of 
fire houses, and one may expect to see fire- 
men, half-shaved, running to answer an 
alarm. The men are figuring whether they 
will be compelled to pay for two shaves when 
they return to have the job completed. 

The Insurance and Investment News of Los 
Angeles compliments Mayor Rolph on the ap- 
poii tment of H. U. Brandenstein as a fire 
commissioner, on account of his former ex- 
perience as supervisor, together with his ag- 
gressiveness and tact, he promises to add 
greatly to the efficiency of the department. 

As the Richmond district has about doubled 
in population since the fire of April, 1906, 
Chief Murphy suggests that another engine 
house be added and transfer the company at 
the beach to the westerly end of Sunset. As 
a portion of Richmond is included in the plans 
for the Panama Exposition, the chief thinks 
much better fire protection will be necessary. 

The Pacific Motor comes to us this month, 



Resolutions have been passed by the San 
Francisco Board of Supervisors appropriating 
$300,000 for constructing an auxiliary fire pro- 
tection system pumping station at Fort Ma- 
son, $8,000 for pumps and pipe connections at 
the Ashbury Heights tank of the auxiliary 
system for the purpose of filling the Twin 
Peaks reservoir, $15,000 for enabling the 
Board of Public Works to operate the pipe 
yards and to test the high-pressure pipes of 
this system. 

CommissionerTurnerof Oakland is working 
to have the salt water high-pressure system 
connected with the fresh water mains of the 
water company. This will reduce the deteri- 
oration of the pipes by rusting. In case of 
breakage or a large fire, the salt water will 
be used through a by-pass. The high-press- 
ure system has proven a complete success, 
and Oakland now takes its place as one of the 
foremost cities in the country in the way of 
fire protection. 

Last week we received Volume 3 No. 6 of 
the Seattle Fireman (type-written), too late 
to notice in current issue. It contains inter- 
esting dala of the Seattle Firemen's Relief 
Association, department news, poetry, jokes 
around the fire stations, etc.; also some valu- 
able information showing pressure required 
at hydrant or fire engine while stream is 

owing from different size nozzles, which we 
intend to publish in the near future. It is 
well written and shows a master hand. We 
would be pleased to receive preceding and also 
future numbers, as we wish to keep them on 
file. It is our purpose to publish extracts 
from the January number in future issues of 
the Pacific Fireman. 



To Merge Fire and Police Departments. 

There is a move on foot to merge the Fire 
and Police departments of the city in the near 
future. The object, the promoters claim, is 
that it will make for greater efficiency in both 
departments, especially in times of emer- 
gency. Whether it will or not remains to be 
seen. 

The first step in the proposed reorganization 
plan was taken last Tuesday, when President 
Jesse Cook of the Police Commission, Presi- 
dent H. U. Brandenstein of the Fire Commis- 
sion, Chief Engineer Thomas Murphy of the 
fire department and Walcott held a long 
conference, at which was discussed the pro- 
posal to make the examinations and other re- 
quirements for service in the two departments 
similar, so that their qualifications would 
be practically identical. The next step will 
be to make the training of the members of 
the two departments such that if men are 
needed from one department by another there 
will be nothing to prevent this "borrowing." 

The history of the city has shown a number 
of occasions when the fire department needed 
extra men badly; likewise, the police depart- 
ment. If firemen could be so picked and 
drilled so that they could, in critical times.be 
used by the police department, and vice versa, 
if policemen could be so chosen and trained so 
that they could become firemen when needed, 
the benefit would be of immeasurable value 
to the city. Incidentally, both ends of the 
service would be more useful and the city 
would get more work from its two armies. 



Pasadena Fire News. 



A New Order. 



San Francisco, February 15, 1912. 
To Officers ami Membt rs San Francisco 
Fin: Department:— You are hereby notified 
that on and after April 15, 1912, all members 
of companies in this deparlment shall be re- 
quired toconfine themselves to the boundaries 
of the district to which their respective com- 
panies respond upon a first alarm of fire for 
the purpose of taking their meals, and no 
member shall go beyond the limits of such 
district for that purpose. Companies will be 
furnished with the boundaries of the respec- 
tive meal districts before that date. 

By order Thos. R. Murphy, 

Chief of Department. 

Gabriel Woods, pensioner of this depart- 
ment, residing in Alameda, paid this office a 
pleasant call this week. Gabriel is certainly 
a booster for the Pacific Fireman, he having 
landed two Alameda subs. 



On February 9 engine 2 made a record- 
breaking run to 750 Cypress avenue, and one 
of the firemen, William Vinal by name and a 
powerful built man, made a brave rescue at 
the tire. The house was all ablaze when the 
company arrived, and the owner of the doomed 
building asked one of the men to save a sack 
of wheat so he could have something to feed 
his chickens. Vinal responded to the request 
and dove into the burning building and made 
the rescue. 

On February 10, at night, engine 2 had a 
run to 180 Gloretta street- only abed on fire. 
The damage was very small. 

Hartly of engine 1 is in the business of tak- 
ing down eucalyptus trees also the phone 
wires of the Sunset and Home Telephone 
Company. Ask Hartly what his net gains 
are for the month of January and February. 
Lineman Dennison of the department might 
enlighten us on this subject. 

Driver John Bohn and Hoseman Michel 
were severely injured Fridry night. February 
9, when hose wagon 6 skidded on the wet 
street and turned over at Fourlh and Blux- 
< me streets. The former suffered several 
broken ribs and a fractured nose and the lat- 
ter a broksn right leg. 

Mike Fitzgerald of this city and a can of 
turpentine got too near a furnace last week. 
The turpentine was burned and so was Mike. 
With good nursing Mike will recover. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



San Francisco Fire Commissioners. 



REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE. 

SAN FRANCISCO, FEBRUARY 15, 1912. 
To the Hon., the Board of Fire Commissioners: 
Gentlemen:- Your Administrative Com- 
mittee respectfully submits the following re- 
port of matters that have come before it for 
consideration since the last regular meeting 
of the board, together with its recommenda- 
tions for recommendations for action thereon 
bv your Honorable Board: 

Report of Hydrantman Rice relative to the 
hydrant at the northeast corner of 16th and 
Valencia streets being broken by an automo- 
bile truck belonging to the Northwestern Cali- 
fornia Transit Company, the total cost of re- 
pairing same amounting to $51.25. Filed and 
the secretary directed to file a claim for said 
amount with the Northwestern California 
Transit Company. 

• Communication from H. P. Baden, driver 
chemical 3, applying for salary on account of 
sprained ankle received while responding to 
an alarm of fire on January 13, 1912. Allowed 
salary on the recommendation of battalion 
chief. 

Communication from Visitation Valley Im- 
provement Association relative to the pur- 
chase of a site at San Bruno avenue and Rail- 
road avenues for a fire house. Petition of 
Noe Valley Improvement Club for a fire house 
at 28th and Diamond streets. Referred to the 
chief engineer for investigation and report. 

Resolution of the Civil Service Commission 
relative to filing application for authorization 
to make temporary appointments ten days 
prior to the date of service. Filed. 

Communication from W. J. Shields, stoker 
engine 23, requesting that he be allowed a 
leave of absence for thirty days, without pay, 
commencing on the Kith instant. Granted. 

Report of Superintendent of Horses for the 
month of January, 1912. Filed. 

Report of Superintendent of Horses relative 
to the transfer of the following numbered 
horses to the Health Department: Nos. 391, 
538, 4(12, 385 and 371. Filed 

Communication from W. R. Casey, hoseman 
engine 17, tendering his resignation as a mem- 
bur of the department, to take effect from 
the 6th instant. Accepted. 

From Chief Engineer, submitting a com- 
plaint against N. Porrone. truckman truck 2, 
for speaking in a disrespectful manner to his 
superior officer. Captain Leahy. Chargesor- 
dered filed. 

Communication from foreman machinist 
calling attention to the fact that the work of 
brazing a transmission case for automobile 
number 7 of the department was not properly 
done and recommending that the bill of the 
Sin Francisco Brazing and Welding Company 
for the Bume, amountiug to $15, be not al- 
lowed until the work is properly done. Ap- 
proved ami so ordered. 

Communication from the foreman machinist 

recommending that certain extra parts for the 

Ameriaan I. a France motor driven chemical 

If purchased. Approved and so ordered. 

Communication from Red lick -Newman Com- 



pany presenting claim against A. Butt, lieu- 
tenant engine 8. Referred to chief engineer. 

Opinion of the City Attorney in the matter 
of Hubert Jennings, hoseman engine 17. 
Filed. 

Communication from Annie Buckley relative 
to her late husband's pension. Referred to 
Board of Fire Pension Fund Commissioners. 

Recommendation of chief engineer that the 
following applications for transfers be grant- 
ed: John Meader from driver monitor bat- 
tery 1 to hoseman engine 12; Harry Brown 
hoseman engine 12 to hoseman engine 3; J. 
Mullaly from hoseman engine 3 to driver 
monitor battery 1. Approved and so ordered. 

Communication from the chief engineer 
relative to the Sullivan monument. Filed. 

Communication from the International 
I Union of Steam Engineers relative to the en- 
gineers of this department being excused 
from attendance at drills at the drill tower. 
Chief engineer directed to grant this request. 

Resolutions of Board of Public Works rec- 
i ommending that this board accept new build- 
ing for engine 6 on Seventh street, as the 
same has been completed and accepted by the 
Board of Public Works. 

At the regular meeting of the Board of 
Fire Commissioners held Thursdsy, February 
15, 1912, at 7:30 p. m. (all members being pres- 
ent) the following business was transacted: 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Communication from Gorham Engineering 
and Fire Apparatus Company, requesting per- 
mission to assign the contract for motor pro- 
pelled city service truck to the Seagrave 
Company of Columbus, Ohio (laid over until 
Mr. Tabercan appear before theBoard). De- 
nied. 

Consideration of matter of charges against 
Hubert Jennings, hoseman engine 17. Dis- 
missed from department. 

NEW BUSINESS. 

Resolution requesting the Civil Service Com- 
mission to certify names of eligibles for cer- 
tain non-civil positions in the department. 
Adopted. 

SPECIAL ORDERS. 

Trial of Narcisco Perrone, truckman truck 
2, for speaking in a disrespectful manner to 
his superior officer (set for 8 o'clock p. m). 
Charges dismissed. 

Site for engine bouse 24 ordered purchased 
at 22d street and H. iff man avenue. 

Seattle's Fire Marshal's Report. 

The following is a synopsis of the Fire 
Marshal's report to tie' CitJ Council for the 
month of January, 1912: 

Value of buildings involved $874,650 

Value of contents 279,638 

Total values involved 654,288 

Insurance on buildings 204,800 

Insurance on com en Is 120,700 

Total insurance invoU ed... 325, 5011 

Loss on buildings s, 1 18 31 

Loss on contents of buildings I'.I.SMo 4(1 

Total loss on buildings and their 

contents 2S.nn;: 71 

Alarms From street boxes 23 

Alarms received by telephone. pt 



Alarms given at engine houses 10 

Total alarms of all kinds 32 

False alarms 12 

Fires caused by chimneys and flues 19 

Fires caused by heating and cook- 
ing appliances 

Fires caused by unknown causes, 
mostly carelessness 

Fires caused by matches and smok- 
ing 

Fires caused by gasoline and auto- 
mobiles 

Fires caused by rubbish 

Fires caused by electricity 

Fires caused by Christmas trees... 

Fires caused by chemicals 

Fires originating in unoccupied 
buildings 2 

Fires in brick, stone or concrete 
buildiugs 14 

Fires in frame buildings 37 

Harry W. Bringhurst, 

Fire Marshal. 



14 

10 

6 

5 
3 
2 
2 
2 



Mysterious Fire in Oakland. 

A fire of mysterious origin at Tenth and 
Washington streets threatened the block last 
Saturday night. The department responded 
| promptly and extinguished the fire in short 
order. Considerable damage was done by 
smoke and water. This is the second time in 
the last ten months that a fire of the same 
origin has threatened this locality. 

Be Yourself. 



Attempting to please everybody you are 
pleasing nobody. Be yourself. If you are a 
rascal, and won't be anything else, be a ras- 
cal openly and not skulk behind the mask of 
respectability. If you are like the rest of 
humanity with a thousand faults don't try to 
put on the innocent look of a "goody-goody." 
It won't work. People soon catch on. If 
you believe a thing to be right, stay by your 
convictions, though|you might please a friend 
by adopting his opiniou — very few friendships 
are worth holding anyway. Be what you are 
out and out before the world and the world 
will respect you for at least your freeness 
from hypocricv. 

A local paper tells of what is probably a 
fatal accident in this city. It says: "Mrs. 
Jones lei a can-opener slip and cut herself in 
the pantry.'' We almost know that Mrs. 
.lones will die. 

A lady of Ibis city, who does everything by 
the book, slopped when her twins fell in a 
hole until she hunted up the Ladies' Home 
Magazine to find an article "How to Bring 
Up Children." 

A lady in Cheyenne, so the papers aver, 
gave birth to three babies on three successive 

days. That .s pret l \ good work, and no doubt 

the lad] would have finished the week if it 
hadn't been for the cold wive which has put 
. ;., .ii i ;.,.).. ..i- I..., ; 



IOO I IP, VI I I Ol l I ie , i | i \\ . i V i \\ 

crimp in .ill i. inds of business. 



There are over 200, words in the English 

language, and most of them "..reused last 
Sunday by a lady of this city who discovered 

after comit r of church that her stunning 

new hai was adorned with a price tag on 
which was written "Reduced 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowerinp plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening, Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Reach Nurseries, take Castro street car to 23rd, or 

Mission, 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



EAGLESON & CO. 

1158 MARKET ST. 

PHONE MARKET 5417 

MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS 



AND SHIRTS 



Guaranteed Navy Flannel Firemen's 
Shirts 

alio 1 12 South Spring Street, Leu Angeles 



Gold and Silver Trimmings. All Kinds of Gold Embroider- 
ing Done to Order. 

Telephone Douglas 2600 

BLOOM BROS. Inc. 

MAT A1XP CAP FACTORY 

Military and Na yry Caps a Specialty 

109 NEW MONTGONERY ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



Empress Theatre. 

Beginning with the matinee Sunday 
afternoon, first and foremost on the 
program will be the Metzetti Troupe 
of eight dare-devil acrobats doing feats 
which no other gymnastic organization 
is doing today. A special feature will 
be Ad Carlisle's Dog and Pony Circus, 
an act which young and old will ap- 
preciate. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. 
Dowling will be seen in "An Arizona 
Wooing,'' a dainty Western comedy 
playlet. There is a scientific way to 
blow soap bubbles, and Ollie Young 
and April show how it is dene. 
Caine and Odom will present a genuine 
wholesome bit of original songs and 
piano playing. Georgia, vaudeville's 
latest recruit, is said to be a piquant 
interpreter of cyncopated hits, written 
especially for her. She dresses the act 
beautifully and with each song she 
wears a different gown. Draper, 
Crowley and Gough will present an 
acrobatic and juggling act, and Haw- 
kins and Rawson will be seen in a nov- 
elty, entitled "A Pavement Rehearsal" 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



Phone Home C 2458 



FIREMEN EAT AT THE 

...B. &. D. RESTAURANT... 

Where you get the best for the least money. 
H. O. DALBEY, Msr. 

178 THIRD ST., San Francisco 

OPEN TILL MIDNIGHT. Phone Doutrlas 2S46 



\A/M. F. EGAN 

M. R. C. V. S. 

.VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D 



Lamanet Bros. 

Is the place of all places to gel the 
very latest and best in the way o( 

FIREMEN'S REGULATION SHIRTS 
FIREMEN'S TURNOUT SUITS 
GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS 
HATS & UNDERWEAR, ETC. 

524 BROADWAY STREET 

SAIV HRA1NCISCO 



The telephone operators in New York City 

handle 180.0 alls every rush hour. They Mill 

connect you with any oue of r.Hn.uMii subscribers 
in half a minute. 

Ask the exchange manager how he fan handle 
all these ealls. and he will tell you tersely, "By 
saying the seconds 

"Schedule time" is the keynote of American 
industry Thai means Howard time. There's 
always somebody higher up holding a Howard 
Watch on tin., j .b— demanding the Howard type 
of accuracy and punctuality. 

The Howard is the one wateh in the world 
wholly adapted to modern progress. It has 
the precise construction and the scientific ad- 
justment. 

A Howard Wateh Is always worth what you 
pay for it _ . , 

The price of each wateh— from the 1, -jewel 
(double roller) in a Crescent E\lra or Jas. Boss 

Extra gold-filled ease at $40. to the 23-Jewel at 
$150. and the Edward Howard model at I 
Is fixed at the factory and a printed ticket at- 
tached. . 

Find the Howard jeweler in your town 
talk '" him Not every jeweler can sell yo 
Howard. The jeweler who can is a good man 
to know. 

Admiral Slgsbee has written a little hook. 
•The Log of the Howard Watch." giving the 
record of his own Howard in the I'. S. Navy. 
you'll enjoy it. E>rop us a post-card, Dept X. 

and we'll send you a copy. 

HOWARD WATCH WORKS, Boston, Mass, 

t. h7"kiugo 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 
71 WALLER ST.. SAN F RANCISCO 

SALVAR 

f I Will Save) 

The Greatest BLOOD REMEDY in the World 

WILL CURE 

RHEUMATISM 

Acute or Chronic 



1155 GOLDEN GATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 

M. L. M1LCOVICH. Prop. 

Martin's Restaurant and Grill 

1533 STEINER STREET 



Telephone Douglas 287 1 



WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRANT BROKERS 



iO KEARNY STREET 

i 
COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



National Guard and Society Uniforms a Specialty 

CALIFORNIA UINIF'ORiVl 



TAILORING COMPANY 

MARCCS LAFEE, Prop. 
WE MAKE SLUTS TO ORDER FROM $30 UP 

287 O'FARRELL ST. Bel. Powell and Mason 



„, I Douglas 3770 

Phones j Home c 377 „ 



Phone Market 1795 



Home J 1795 



JOE. H. ROSENBERG 

(fjiuil anil iHililani aaiUir 
73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 

Louis Frjokenberg, formerly with Rosenblum & Abraham, Manager 



The Little Emporium 

L. R1ZNIC Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 

2296-98 GEARY STREET 

Near Broderklc 
Telephone West 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 



BLOOD POISON 

Acquired or Hereditary 

PARALYSIS 

CATARRH 
MALARIA 



Diseases of Liver, Kidneys and Bladder 



Diseases Peculiar to Women 



$10.0(1 FOR 40 TO 60 DAYS' TREATMENT 

Call or Write for our 100 Page Booklet 



TO THEPUBLIC 

In offering Salvar to the public, we do so 
with perfect confidence, and state publicly our 
willingness to have our remedy thoroughly tested 
in any fair and equitable manner, in the treat- 
ment of all diseases we claim it will relieve, and 
we will abide by a decision so given and dis- 
continue its sale at once if it is found different in 
any particular from what it is represented to be. 

SEITZ & MILLS. Agents 
1402 Market St., near 10th, San Francisco 




j7 







^WfiMN 



m -. m 



:_i**Y«'"£r^V; 



=dq= 




VOL. IX. -NO. 8. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



The Equitable Life Assur- 
ance Building Fire. 

AS PUBLISHED recently in the 
Fire and Water Engineering, the 
Equitable Life Assurance So- 
ciety's building, occupying a square 
block bounded by Broadway, Pine, 
Nassau and Cedar streets, was com- 
pletely destroyed by fire Tuesday, Jan. 
9. Not only were six persons killed, 
including Battalion Chief Walsh, and 
many injured, but there was a prop- 
erty loss of at least $3,000,000, and 
possibly much more. The bitter cold 
and heavy wind added to the distress 
of the fire fighters. Business in the 
financial district was partially para- 
lyzed, it being impossible to reach 
banking and brokerage offices housesd 
in the neighborhood of the fire. 

The origin of the fire was made 
the subject of an investigation on the 
following day by Fire Commissioner 
Johnson, through John P. Prial, a spe- 
cial fire marshal, and Edward Croker, 
Jr., an assistant. Their report will go 
to the officials later. 1 1 is said that 
they found reason to believe that had 
the alarm been sent in when the fire 
was first discovered in the kitchen of 
the Cafe Savarin, it might easily have 
been checked. It seemed to be of so 
little consequence thai I he emplo\ e., 
thought they could handle it. It was 
this mistake that lei the fire get be- 
yond control and offered to the first 
arriving companies a conflagration 

sw ping from the basement to the 

roof of the building. The fire got its 
starf between 3:30 and 5:20a. m., when 

the police lirsl learned of it. Bakers 



in the Savarin came to work at the 
earlier hour and told Sergeant Casey, 
after the alarm had been turned in, 
that they had been at work for an hour 
and a half before the fire was discov- 
ered. It began in a pile of papers and 
empty boxes near the foot of the stairs 
leading from the kitchen of the Sav- 
arin, which is situated in the basement 
to the main floor of the building. The 
first spark might have been from a 
cigarette, as is considered most likely, 
or possibly from one of the stoves in 
the kitchen. 

As soon as the flames were discov- 
ered the men set about extinguishing 
them as best they could. When the 
first attention of the police was at- 
tracted to the fire the men told the 
policemen that they had been at 
work about half an hour, and that they 
had the flames under control. They 
objected to the suggestion of the po- 
licemen that a fire alarm be sent in. 
In this respect, the officials say, they 
may have been carrying out the in- 
structions of the heads of the building, 
as employes are of ten ordered neverto 
send in ati alarm of fire if it can possi- 
bly be avoided. Following up the 
stairs, the fire was caught up by the 
draft of the elevator shafts, lo which 
the stairs lead. In a few minutes 
they were licking the top of the build- 
ing and spreading out over the top 
floor. 

Sergeant Casey and Policeman Folej 
were muffled to the chin ai Pine 
and Nassau streets about 5:05 a. m., 
when a man who had run, the? thought 
aftiTu anl, oui of the Equitable build 
ing, told them that the building was 
on fire. Casey and Foley hustled 



around the corner to the Pine street 
side, which was occupied by the Cafe 
Savarin. Going through the restau- 
rant they pushed aside flustered cooks 
and made their way to the rear, where 
they found William Davis, the chief 
engineer of the building, and four of 
his men spilling water into a small 
room that was thick with smoke. The 
room adjoined an elevator shaft near 
the corner of Pine and Nassau. Davis 
had two lines of hose connected with 
the standi. ipes and was working des- 
perately. He resented the intrusion 
of the policemen. 

"'What are you doing here?' he 
asked, according to Casey's story. 
'We don't need you people butting 
in here. We can put this out our- 
selves. We've got .good apparatus 
and there are twenty men on hand to 
help me. " 

Casey didn't like the looks of things. 
Without arguing any more with the 
chief engineer, he walked outside 
with Foley and lingered near the cor- 
ner. In fifteen minutes he saw flames 
licking out of the trp windows. The 
fire was nearly to the roof. Then 
Casey ran to the box at Pine and 
Nassau and turned in the first alarm. 

The lire had been going fifteen 
minutesal hast. Deputj Chief Binns, 
head of the first division, saw the 
minute he jumpi d out of his auto- 
mobile that there was a I hi 

ahead. Binns shot in a second alarm 
at r>:. r if> a. in. and a third at 6 a. m. 
That thrilled the whole fire department 
and woke up the whole police depart- 
ment as well. Fire <'l h f Kenloii gol 
to the Equitable ji si after tin' third 
alarm. Kenlon saw tin 1 ! ower- 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



ing on the Equitable roof and sent in 
fourth and fifth alarms at 6:03 a. m. 
and 6:18 a. m. That meant that all 
apparatus south of Fifty-ninth street 
was to make record time to Broadway 
and Pine street. Police Commissioner 
Waldo arrived a few minutes later and 
took personal direction of the police 
guard. It was as dark at 6 o'clock as 
it had been in the middle of the night. 

Engines collected in narrow Nassau, 
Pine and Cedar streets, and hose was 
rigged hastily. There was barely 
room in which to swing a team around. 
The horses, scrambling desperately 
over the icy pavements, and fright- 
ened by the falling stones and fire- 
brands, plunged and tried their best 
to break away. Water cascaded and 
froze on their backs. As rapidly as 
possible the teams were unhitched, 
led to quiet streets and blanketed 
against the cold. Chief Kenlon, his 
face crusted with ice, his hands blocks 
of ice and his slicker silvered from 
frozen particles, entered the Equita- 
ble a few minutes after he arrived to 
try to determine the course of the fire 
and to see if any of the employes 
had been imprisoned by the flames. 
He made his way up to the sixth floor, 
but was driven back by the over- 
powering heat. The chief saw then 
that it would be impossible to save the 
building and that the best to be done 
was to confine the fire and keep it 
from sweeping across the narrow 
streets to the neighboring banks. 

The chief's experience told him that 
there had been too much delay. At 
7:48 a. m. Chief Kenlon summoned 
help from Brooklyn. Deputy Chief 
Lally sent nine engines, four trucks 
and a water tower across the Brooklyn 
Bridge and had his force at work at 
8:15. The Brooklyn fire fighters got 
busy in Nassau street trying to save 
the northwest extension of the Equita- 
ble building, a seven story brick and 
stone structure, occupied by August 
Belmont & Co. and S. A. Reed & Co., 
bankers. They flooded it and saved 
most of it. With all the force he 
could handle in such streets, the twen- 
two Manhattan and nine Brooklyn en- 
gines, together with the water tow- 
ers, trucks and fuel carts, Chief Ken- 
lon attacked the fire from four sides. 
He placed two hose lines in the Singer 



Tower and shot great streams over 
Broadway against the upper stories of 
the Equitable. These dislodged large 
blocks of crumbling stone which fell 
and dashed to bits in Pine street. The 
vaunted high-pressure system, as well 
as the alleged fire-proof construction 
of the Equitable building, failed to do 
what had been expected of it. In the 
face of the high wind that came with 
the renewal of the cold wave in the 
early hours of the morning the streams 
of water from the hose nozzles were 
broken into showers of spray that 
blew aimlessly hither and thither, 
coating the streets and surrounding 
buildings with glistening ice. 

Broadway became a miniature moun- 
tain torrent, through which water and 
caking ice swished ankle deep. Over 
all towered a vast column of yellow 
smoke, shot through with blazing 
sparks that covered the city roofs for 
an area of a mile or more around the 
burning building. Hose lines were 
directed from the upper floors of the 
American Exchange National bank at 
Broadway and Cedar street. An at- 
tack was made on the southeast cor- 
ner from the Hanover bank building, 
while the Brooklyn men, at the north- 
east corner, fought with their water 
towers and carried lines of hose up 
into the Belmont and Reed offices. 
But the Brooklyn tower hnd no luck. 
Twenty minutes after it was put into 
service it stuck in the freezing slush. 
Descending torrents froze its joints 
and it would have taken hours to un- 
limber the kinks. They left it where 
it was all day. 

While attempting to rescue three 
employes of the building who had fled 
to the roof, the report that Battalion 
Chief Walsh had been lost was sent 
out. Two of the men on the roof 
leaped to the street and were killed, 
while the third fell back into the flames 
and perished. The last men to see 
Chief Walsh was Charles S. Bass, 
captain of engine 4, from station 4, 
now at the Hudson street hospital, 
with his arms and face burned. Bass's 
engine was the second to arrive at the 
fire, having been called out on the first 
alarm, shortly before 6 oclock. 

"I took my men and went up to the 
roof," he said. "We then got up as 
far as the fourth floor, where we were 



caught by flames from below. The 
smoke was terrific. I remember a big 
place, like a hallway, covered over 
with a skylight. There was a stair- 
way leading up to the center of the 
hall, and my men were on the stair- 
way. There was an iron railing near 
me and on the other side of it I could 
see Walsh trying to make his way to- 
ward me. He crawled over the rail 
and called in my ear: 'We had better 
get out of this.' No sooner were the 
words out of his mouth when the crash 
came. I was pinned down by some 
piece of furniture and yelled out when 
the flames burnt my arm. A fireman, 
probably a man from truck company 
No. 1, was near me. He must have 
dragged me out to another room and 
taken me down the ladder.'" 

Bass fell back on the pillow, mur- 
muring "Walsh must have got caught 
on the third floor— a great fellow to 
work under." 

Another survivor who was taken to 
the hospital was Timothy Manning, 
captain of Fire Patrol Truck 6. He 
was overcome and carried to the base- 
ment of the United States Realty 
Company. He wanted to get back to 
the fire, but was put into an ambu- 
lance. He is now being closely 
watched in a private room at the hos- 
pital. According to Manning's inco- 
herent account, he did not get to the 
fire until eight o'clock, when the fourth 
alarm was turned in. He says that he 
saw porters jump from the sixth floor 
ledge, on the corner of Cedar street 
and Broadway. "I went up to the 
third floor with a hose— and that is all 
1 remember," he said. 

Several pieces of fire apparatus were 
kept busy on the ruins for three days. 
The fire left the walls of the huge 
structure in a tottering condition on 
all sides, so that all traffic on Broad- 
way, Nassau. Pine and Cedar streets 
has since been suspended. The ten- 
ants on the lower floors of buildings 
fronting on the above named streets 
were compelled to vacate. Many of 
these were banks, trust companies and 
mercantile concerns which have been 
put to a great expense and trouble. 

The recent baseball game between 
the Los Angeles firemen and police- 
men netted $2,373.36 for the Fire- 
men's Relief Fund. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Rida Johnson's brightest comedy, 
"The Lottery Man," will be given its 
first presentation by a stock company 
next Monday evening and throughout 
the week at the Alcazar. When last 
witnessed in San Francisco it was fill- 
ing a fortnight's engagement in one 
of the high-price theatres, and at every 
performance its three acts of clean fun 
kept a big audience in a steady alter- 
nation of smiles and guffaws. A feat- 
ure of the Alcazar production will be 
Evelyn Vaughan's make-up. In the 
role of Lizzie Roberts, a maiden lady 
of most unprepossessing mein and 
vinegary manner, the good looks of 
Miss Vaughan will be sacrificed to 
fulfill the author's ideal of a spinster 
whose lack of pulchritude contributes 
much to the laugh-making. 

Miss Vaughan promises to give an 
adequate portrayal of Lizzie. Bert- 
ram Lytell will be seen as Wright, 
Charles Ruggles as Peyton, Adele Bel- 
garde as his wife, and Beth Taylor as 
Helen, with the remainder of the reg- 
ular company in well-fitting roles. 

At a recent meeting of the Coquille, 
Ore., Volunteer Fire Department, it 
was decided that practice would be held 
twice a month, and those who attended 
practice regularly would be given a 
supper once a month, to be provided 
by the city council, if approved by 
them. Six additional members were 
enrolled: Bruce Johnson, Ernest Per- 
rott, Charlie Harlocker, Aaron Wilson, 
Lanson Leneve. 

The Greer Robbins Company has 
delivered a combination fire truck to 
the City Trustees of Ontario, Cal. 
The chassis is a Mitchell 50-horse- 
power, six-cylinder. The equipment 
consists of a 35-gallon chemical tank, 
200 feet of chemical hose, two three- 
gallon Babcock extinguishers, 500 feet 
of two and a half-inch hose and a 10- 
inch searchlight. This is the first ma- 
chine of this type placed by the Greer- 
Robbins Company in Southern Cali- 
fornia. They also supplied a chief's 
wagon for Long Beach, which has 
been giving good service for a year. 

The auto truck at Redding, Cal., was 
recently tried out by Chief Poole and 
his men in the snow and proved thor- 
oughly efficient. 



Where Gorham Auto Fire Engines are Made 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 




GORHAM ENGINEERING AND FIRE APPARATUS CO. 



SEATTLE 
216 Jackson Street 


SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Street 


LOS ANGELES 
1223 S. Olive Street 


American 


Rubber 


Mfg. Co. 



9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories— Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 



WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 



Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose, Brass 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Department Supplies 



Tire 
with 



Fisk 



When you 
tire of risk 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 




PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 
BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 



Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street. 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 



Entered as second-class matter March 21. 1908. at the 
Postoffice at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 



SATURDAY FEBRUARY 24. 1912 



At a recent meeting of the Fire and Police 
Commissioners, including the Mayor, they 
came to the conclusion that the merging of 
firemen and policemen could not be done sat' 
isfactorily. 

This week, at a conference between Mayor 
Rolph and the Police Commission, it was de- 
cided that the proposal to have a twelve-mile 
hike, as a physical test for policemen, was an 
impossibility. 

At St. Paul Lieutenant John Thorn was 
killed and Miles McDonough, hoseman, was 
fatally injured in a fire that destroyed the 
Grand Opera House early Sunday morning, 
February 18. Loss, $100,000. 

At Tuesday's meeting of the Fire Commis- 
sion President Brandenstein recommended 
that the Board of Supervisors be asked to ap- 
propriate $1,000,000 from the forthcoming 
budget to substitute motor-driven for horse- 
drawn apparatus. 

Some 1269 applications were filed with the 
Civil Service Commission for positions in the 
fire department week before last; 1029 ap- 
peared last week to take physical examina- 
tion and 489 were rejected; 540 passed and 
took athletic test last Thursday, February 15. 

Owing to the bursting of a length of hose 
while testing a turbine gasoline engine at 
the Gorham Engineering and Fire Apparatus 
Company's plant in Oakland last Tuesday, 
Fire Chief Adams of Petaluma, it is reported, 
had his arm broken between elbow and shoul- 
der and sustained other minor injuries. It is 
said that Napa's fire chief also sustained 
some slight injuries. Chief Engineer Murphy 
and Battalion Chief Maxwell were present to 
witness the test. There were many fire chiefs 
and spectators present. 

The Underwriters Report says horse-drawn 
fire apparatus in Portland will be supplanted 
as rapidly as possible with motor vehicles, ac- 
cording to a decision of the fire committee 
of the city executive board at a meeting last 
week when authority was given for bids for 
apparatus to cost over $70,000. This includes 
eight automobile combination hose and chem- 
ical wagons, similar to the two now in opera- 
ation in the city, one automobile engine, one 
auto aerial truck and two autos for the bat- 
talion chiefs. In addition to this 50 fire alarm 
boxes will be purchased and installed in vari- 
ous sections of the city. 



Fire News Around the Bay. 

The city of San Leandro, known throughout 
the country for its annual fete, "The Cherry 
Carnival," is soon to vote on the issuing of 
bonds for the purpose of building a new city 
hall, and to purchase a new combination auto- 
mobile chemical engine, and also to put in a 
new fire alarm system. 

At the present time San Leandro can still 
be considered a small country town, if one 
would judge it by its fire-fighting facilities. 
They consist of the old hand-drawn engine 
and hose cart, and while they may do the 
work at a small fire, yet if the fire is any dis- 
tance from the engine house a vast amount 
of time is lost in pulling the engine to the 
fire, and moments are precious when a fire 
once starts. 

The question for the voters of San Leandro 
to consider on the day of the bond election is 
not the old-time honored question, can we 
afford this new apparatus and fire-alarm sys- 
tem, but rather can we well afford to be with- 
out these necessities? Should the voters of 
San Leandro study the situation, and take 



and ammunition of the National Guard was 
estimated at $10,000. Three touring cars and 
two taxicabs owned by the Oakland Taxicab 
Company, who occupied the building next to 
I he armory, were totally destroyed. 

Chief F. K. Krauth of the Alameda Depart- 
ment attended a test of the new Gorham six- 
cylinder turbine pumping engine Tuesday 
afternoon at the Gorham Engineering Works. 
This engine was built for the city of Oakland. 

The new fire telephone system for the Ala- 
meda Fire Department is completed. The 
system connects all the fire houses, the chief's 
office and the electric light plant through a 
central located in the Webb Avenue firehouse, 
where a man is on duty each of the twenty- 
four hours of the day and night. 

Houston's $6,000,000 Fire. 

Tuesday's Houston conflagration rendered 
thousands of people homeless and caused a 
property loss of $6,000,000. An Associated 
Press dispatch says: 

Driven by a gale that swept in with one of 
the coldest northers of the winter, flames 



swept through the eastern section of, Houston 

into consideration the growth of the city, the , , . , c ui u. 

t j n. . X. <= • early to-day, wiped out twenty-five blocks 

large amount of ground that the firemen in , , , .. . , . . ~ e nnn 

- „ , 6 . , ., . . „ i and caused a loss estimated between $6,000,- 

case of a fire have to cover, and the insta la- 1 „„„ . „,„ „.„ ... „ , .. . ,„.,_ 

| 000 and $10,000,000. Scores of cottages were 

destroyed, as well as many big manufacturing 

plants, and thousands of persons were made 

homeless. The greater part of the loss is 

confined to the lumber and cotton industries. 

Forty-five thousand bales of cotton, stored in 

warehouses and compressses, were burned. 

This item alone represented a loss of $2,- 

000,000. 

The fire started in a cottage near the South- 
ern Pacific railroad tracks soon after mid- 
night. Its origin has not been definitely es- 
tablished. A heavy wind picked up the flames 
and carried them to neighboring cottages and 
boarding houses. In a flash these ignited. 
The forty-mile gale carried sparks many 
blocks away, and within half an hour a great 
area of small residences was burning. 

The fire spread rapidly to nearby manufac- 
turing plants, so rapidly that firemen aban- 
doned attempts to check the flames, and 
instead devoted their energies to warning 
householders. Possible loss of life thus was 
averted. 

At the manufacturing plants and cotton 
compresses firemen and volunteers had organ- 
ized to fight the flames. Walls and roofs were 
water-soaked, but when the flames reached 
the factories they succumbed as easily as the 
rows of cottages. 

An hour after the fire started the firemen 
organized for a final stand at Buffalo bayou, a 
small stream that divides the eastern part of 
the city from the main section, and every 
piece of fire fighting apparatus was stationed 
along the banks. If the fire leaped the buyou 
it meant the destruction of the city. 

When the flames had swept through million 
dollar manufacturing plants and rows of 
flimsy cottages with equal ease and came to 
the stream they leaped across in narrow 
places. Cataracts of water playing on the 
onrushing flame wall threw it back, however, 



tion of the new fire alarm system, which will 
save time in locating the fire as well as giving 
the alarm promptly, they would vote unani- 
mously for these necessities. 

Chief Eber reports things quiet in San Le- 
andro in the way of fires. 

The Civil Service Board of Oakland has 
been requested to advance the foremen and 
extra or call men to full pay, without any ex- 
amination. The pay will be $1560 per annum 
for engineers, and $1224 to $1404 per annum 
for drivers, tillermen, stokers, truckmen and 
hosemen; but upon considering the question 
the board decided that in passing from the 
position of extraman to the position of a reg- 
ular fireman a man will receive $1,000 a year 
more from the city, and on reaching the age 
of 55, after 20 years of service in the depart- 
ment, he will be allowed to retire on a pen- 
sion equal to half of the salary he received a 
year prior to the date of his retirement. 
Placing the extramen on full pay would make 
a difference of $1,000 a year for salary and 
$510 a year by way of pension. 

The final decision of the board was that 
every man receiving the extra compensation 
should show himself both physically and men- 
tally fit to perform the duty he proposes to 
undertake, and in order to do this all must 
take the examination. 

The department was, up to within a very 
recent time, composed mostly of foremen en- 
gaged in private occupations, and received 
$40 a month, and extra men also engaged in 
private occupations and received $30 a month 
for their fire duty. This department is now 
being put on a pay basis under Civil Service. 
A fire, the cause of which is unknown, 
gutted the old armory of Companies A and F, 
National Guard of California, 480 Twentieth 
street, Sunday afternoon. The damage to 
the building was estimated at $15,000. 
The damage by fire and water to the arms 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



and for the first time since the firemen began 
their fight they gained control. 

Thousands of persons were driven from 
their homes. In the cold of the norther they 
suffered slightly from exposure. Relief work 
was at once set underway, however, and food 
and clothing provided. Many persons were 
hurt during the fire, but so far as can be 
learned there were no fatalities. 

The burned area is at least a mile and a 
half long and at points a quarter of a mile 
wide. 

One of the first of the more pretentious 
buildings attacked was the brick Crescent 
hotel. The inmates had been warned and all 
escaped without injury. 

San Francisco Fire Commissioners. 



REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE. 
SAN FRANCISCO, FEBRUARY 15, 1912. 

To theHon., the Board of Fire Commissioners: 

GENTLEMEN:- Your Administrative Com- 
mittee respectfully submits the following re- 
port of matters that have come before it for 
consideration since the last regular meeting 
of the hoard, together with its recommenda- 
tions for action thereon by your Honorable 
Board: 

Communication from S. D. Russell, battal- 
ion chief, submitting a claim for $748 33, the 
same being the difference in salary between 
that of a captain and a battalion chief from 
March, 1910, until February, 1911, during 
all of which time he alleges that he was ille- 
gally deprived of said difference in salary. 
Filed and the secretary to instruct Chief Rus- 
sell that this is a matter for judicial determi- 
nation. 

Communication from Michael Boden, bat- 
talion chief, submitting a claim for $1,168.33. 
the same being the difference in salary be- 
tween that of a captain and a battalion chief, 
from March 11, 1910, until August 1, 1911, 
dnring all of which time he alleges that he 
was illegally deprived of said difference in 
salary. Filed and the secretary to instruct 
Chief Boden that this is a matter for judicial 
determination. 

Application of William Beiden, engineer en- 
gine 3, for salary on account of sprained 
ankle received while working at ihe quarter? 
of his company on February 12. 1912 Al 
lowed salary on the recommendation of In. 
battalion chief. 

Aoplication of Christian Lutz, truckman 
tnuolc 4. for salary on aceoont of an injury to 
his groin, received wink working at the quar- 
ters of his company on Ihe Sill instant. Al- 
lowed salary on the recommendation of his 

i aliun chief. 

Communication from "amemberof the fire 
department 1 ' (anonymous) calling attention 
i . the legal standing of several lieutenants in 
i he depart ii. Piled. 

Report of chief engineer in the matter of 
the accident whereby the hose wagon of en 
gio.. fi was capsized and two members injured 
while responding to an alarm of fire on the 
9i i nt. Filed. 

Application of John Bohn for salary on ac- 
count of injury in face, head aral km k. re- 



ceived while responding to an alarm of fire 
with his company on February 9, 1912. Al- 
lowed salary on recommendation of his bat- 
talion chief. 

Application of John Miskel, hoseman en- 
gine 6, for salary on account of injury to arm 
and side, received while responding to an 
alarm of fire with his company on February 
9, 1912. Allowed salary on recommendation 
of his battalion chief. 

Application of William O'Farrell, captain 
chemical 9, for salary on account of an injury 
to his side received while in the discharge of 
duty on February 4, 1912. Allowed salary on 
the recommendation of his batlalion chief. 

Communication from N. G. Potter, relative 
to claim for $15 for work performed in braz- 
ing an automobilecasing. Filed. 

Recommendation of the chief engineer that 
the following changes of positions be effected 
in the department, to take effect from date: 
John McLaughlin, from stoker to hosemanen- 
gine43; W. J. Marlow, from hoseman to stok- 
er engine 43. Approved and so ordered. 

From the Board of Supervisors, submitting 
a copy of resolutions authorizing ihe Board of 
Fire Commissioners to appoint a stenographer 
and typewriter and fixing the compensation 
therefor. Filed. 

Recommendation of the chief engineer that 
the following members be permanently ap- 
pointed, they having satisfactorily served 
their probationary terms in the department: 

A. T. Williams as truckman tiuck 8, to take 
effect. March 1, 1912. 

T. W. Fields as hoseman engine 3, to take 
effect February 18, 1912. 

G. E Racehorn as hoseman engine 6, to take 
effect February 24, 1912. 

Bernard Dervin as truckman .truck 8, to 
take effect February 24, 1912. Api roved and 
so ordered. 

Communication from the Mission Promotion 
Association relative to the desirability of af- 
fording protection against fire to the residents 
on ih*- westerly slope of the Potrero Hill and 
requesting that a dale be set for the hearing 
of a committee on ihismatler. Taken under 
advisement, and Lhe secretary to notify the 
Mission Promotion Association that lhe board 
will hear such committee at its regular meet- 
ing of February 291 h. 

Communication from the Public Efficiency 
ana Public Welfare Committee of ihe Hoard 
of Super visor.-, requesting ihe attendance at 
a meeting of said committee to he held on 
Tuesday, February 20th al 2:80 p. in.. "Inn 
the mailer o I' the "loan -halt evil" will he 

taken up for consideration. Filed and ihe 
» i reiary directed to forward a coj > 01 s»mi 
io the members of the board. 
Communication from A SvIvpv tpmporarj 

dra\ man al i he corporal ion yard, requi 

that lie he allowed :;il;it'\ for tile llielilhof 

January, 1912. he being absent [torn duly on 

aer Mini of siekness. Ilenle.i. : llie Mile al- 
lowing salary on account >>i Sickness only ap- 
plies io regular members of ihe department, 
Comn ' "ii am from the I ii ince ' lummil 
i ... Board of Supervisor,, submitting claim ol 
Joseph Thompson', truckman truck 8, 



count of injuries received while drilling at the 
drill tower of this department on October 18, 
1911, amounting to $2,000, and desiring infor- 
mation as to whether this case comes under 
he pension rules of this board. Secretary to 
refer matter back to Finance Committee with 
the necessary information thereon. 
Respectfully submitted, 

H. U. Brandenstein, 
President Board of Fire Commissioners. 
Thos. R. Murphy, 
Chief Engineer S. F. F. D. 
Administrative Committee. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The secretary was instructed to advertise 
for bids on tractors for two engines, also two 
auto hose tenders, two auto hose wagons and 
one battalion chief's auto. 

C. A. Carroll was appointed stenographer 
to the board. 



The Fire Commission Tuesday decided to 
replace "key" boxes with open boxes. 

Beard Froze to the Ground. 



A North Caldwell, N. J., dispatch of Feb- 
ruary 21 says until recently Charles Gordon 
was possessed of as long a beard as grew in 
Jersey; for 50 years the pride of Essex coun- 
ty. Now it'sonly a goatee. The other morn- 
ing Mr. Gordon went to the pump for water; 
on the return trip he stumbled and fell, spill- 
ing the water. So cold was it that the com- 
bination of water and whiskers froze to the 
ground. Mrs. Gordon hurried to the rescue 
with her trusty kitchen knife.. Hastily chop- 
ping her husband loose from the ground, she 
lid a poor tonsorial job of it, necessitating 
Mr. Gordon's urgent visit to the barber shop 
— the first in 50 years, where Ihe remnants 
of whiskers were rounded into a meager 
goatee. 

A preacher in Minnesota who had filled the 
pulpit for eighteen years and couldn't raise 
18 cents, abandoned his job and went into the 
real estate business. In eighteen months he 
had a bank account of $18,01)0 and hadn't been 
forced to lie any more than he did in his for- 
mer job. 

While George Smith of Portland, Ore., was 
taking out a marriage license to marry Mar- 
tha King, Miss Mary Smalley rushed in, 
lore up the license, slapped Smith's face and 
chased him into the street. "He promised he 
would marry me." she . Mary cer- 

tainly does not believe in breach of promise 
suits. _^__ 

A lady in I.os Angeles was so pleased wilh 
her new telephone and Used il SO much that 
she has blisters on her tongue ami a com on 

her ear listening to Bcandalq in her neighbor- 
borhood. 

A man in this city, a local paper slates, 
who has onlj been married ■■• couple of 
months, thinks ihe clerk made a mistake and 

gave him a dog license, as he has been living 
a dog's life ever since. 

A lineman in Chicago tried to roll a ciger- 

elle while perched al lhe lop of a li'rlllelo- 

graph pole one da] last week. His local at- 

i . . dell 'I 

'em. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Weddina and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening. Etc, 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Reach Nurseries, take Castro street car to 23rd. or 

Mission, 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Doug-lass and 24th streets. 



EAGLESON & CO. 

1158 MARKET ST. 

PHONE MARKET 5417 

MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS 



AND SHIRTS 



Guaranteed Navy Flannel Firemen's 
Shirts 

alio 1 12 South Spring Street, Los Angeles 



Gold and Silver Trimmings. All Kinds of Gold Embroider- 
ing Done to Order. 

Telephone Douglas 2000 

BLOOM BROS. Inc. 

M AT AIND CAP FACTORY 

Mi litary and Navy Caps a Specialty 

109 NEW MONTGONERY ST., SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 



FIREMEN EAT AT THE 

...B. &. D. RESTAURANT... 

Where you (ret the best for the least money. 
H. O. DALBEV. Mir. 

178 THIRD ST., San Francisco 

OPEN TILL MIDNIGHT. Phone Douglas 2546 



WM. F. 



:gan 



Empress Theatre. 

The Etta Leon Troupe of Wire Walk- 
ers will headline next week's offerings 
at the Empress. Some very daring 
and sensational climaxes are intro- 
duced near the end of the performance. 
Of course the Baseball Four will give 
a rattling good account of themsel- 
ves. The very newest recruit into the 
realm of vaudeville is a real live prin- 
cess in the person of Princess Luba 
Miroff, who hails from the land of the 
Big Bear. Princess Mil off is gifted 
with a beautiful voice, a superb figure, 
a pretty face and a charming, princess- 
like personality. Harry Von Fossen, 
a black-faced comedian, has created a 
wonderful place in his big company. 
He is said to have cleaned them all up 
by his versatility back East. Von 
Fossen has literally stopped the show 
on several occasions since his tour, and 
his appearance here will probably be 
no exception to the rule. Cadieux, 
a tight wire expert, will be seen in 
somersaults and various other daring 
stunts during the coming week. Kitty 
Ross, who is billed as the fascinating 
firefly, will be a welcome addition with 
her catchy songs, and will demonstrate 
the necessity of a personality for stage 
success. Two extra added features 
and motion pictures will be added to 
an otherwise meritorious bill. 



M. R. C. V. S. 

..VETERIINARY SURUEOM TO S. F. F. D... 



1155 GOLDEN GATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 

M. L. MILCOVICH. Prop. 

Martin's Restaurant and Grill 

1533 STEINER STREET 



Telephone Dousta! 287 1 



WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 



WARRANT BROKERS 



630 KEARNY STREET 



COR. COMMERCIAL 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Lamanet Bros. 

Is the place of all places to gel the 
very latest and best in the way of 

FIREMEN'S REGULATION SHIRTS 
FIREMEN'S TURNOUT SUITS 
GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS 
HATS & UNDERWEAR, ETC. 

524 BROADWAY STREET 

SAIN FRANCISCO 



Phone Market 1795 



• J 1795 



JOE. H. ROSENBERG 

(Eiiiil artu iRilitarn uJailnr 

73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 
Louis Frankenberg. formerly with Rosenblum & Abraham. Manager 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



The teli phone operatoi In New York City 

handle L80.000 calls every rusl ir. They will 

conned you with any oue ol 500,000 subscribers 
in halt a minute 

Ask i he exchange ma nagei how hi ca n I 

all these calls, and he will tell : i ■ ! ■ 

saving the seconds." 

"Schedule 1 Ime' is t he keynote ol Amei Lea n 

Industry. That ana Howard time. There 

always somebody hlghei up holding a Howard 

Watc i the Job demanding the Howard type 

of accuracy ind pund ua I 

The Howard is the one watch in the world 
wholly adapted to modern progress. it has 
i he precise c msl i in i ion and I \ e si lenl Lfli 
Justment, 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
paj for it. 

The price of each watch— from the 11 lev 
(double roller) in a Cresci t Extra 01 Jai Boss 
Extra gold-filled c Lse at 1 10, to the 23-jew 
J150, and the Edward Howard model at • 
is fixed at the factory and a pi ket at- 

tached. 

Flinl llie Howard jeweler In your town and 
talk i" him Nol evei | je* eler cai 
Howard. The jeweler who can Is a good man 
to know. 

Admiral Slgsbee has written a little book, 
■■The Log of the Howard Watch."" giving the 
i i.i of his own Howard in the I'. S. Navy. 

Vou'ii enjoy it. Drop us a post-card, Dept. N. 

and we'll send you a i opy. 

HOWARD WAivH WORKS. Boston. Mass 



T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 

71 WALLE.R ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 



SALVAR 

( I Will Save) 

The Greatest BLOOD REMEDY in the World 

WILL CURE — 

RHEUMATISM 

Acute or Chronic 



Home phone S 2517 

The Little Emporium 

L. RIZNIC Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEA R A SPEC I A l.TY 
2206-98 GEARY STREET 

Near Broderitk 



Telephone Well 4824 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BLOOD POISON 

Acquired or Hereditary 

PARALYSIS 
CATARRH 
MALARIA 



Diseases of Liver, Kidneys and Bladder 



Diseases Peculiar to Women 



$10.00 FOR 40 TO 60 DAYS' TREATMENT 

Call or Write fur nur 1(10 Page Booklet 



TO^KH K PUBLIC 

In offering Salvar to the public, we do so 
with perfect confidence, and state publicly our 
willingness to have our remedy thoroughly tested 
in any (air and equitable manner, in the treat- 
ment of all diseases we claim it will relieve, and 
we will abide by a decision so given and dis- 
continue its sale at once if it is found different in 
any particular from what it is represented to br. 

SEITZ & MILLS, Agents 
U02 Market St.. near 10th, San Francisco 




►agifi 




fIREMN 




VOL. IX. -NO. 9. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Two Persons Killed in Portland Fire. 

A Portland, Ore., dispatch, dated 
February 26, says: 

The destruction by fire early to-day 
of the Gilman hotel at First and Alder 
streets, a landmark of pioneer days, 
resulted in the death of two men and 
three other persons are missing. Ed- 
ward Gil more, aged 50, fell dead of 
excitement, and an unidentified man 
was killed when he jumped to the side- 
walk from a fourth-floor window. 
Seventy lodgers in the hotel were 
forced to flee scantily clad into street. 
The loss to the hotel property and ad- 
joining buildings will exceed $150,000. 

The fire was a spectacular one. Soon 
after the alarm was sounded the win- 
dows in the hotel began to fill with 
men, women and children who, terror- 
ized by the smoke, were afraid to seek 
safety through the narrow corridors. 
Most of the panic-stricken persons 
were carried down the fire escapes and 
fire department ladders. Nearly a 
score of persons went to the roof of 
the burning building and crossed over 
to the roof of an adjoining building, 
from which they were rescued. 

Pity the Fire Commissioner. 

The following excerpts we clip from 
the Fireman's Herald of February 17: 

"Fire commissioners have troubles 
of their own, even if there is good rea- 
son for the firemen's belief that they 
cnnsider that their first, duty is to 
make the chief of department un- 
happy. A conscientious fire commis- 
sioner has a hard row to hoe. It is he 
who must try to get the money to carry 
out the suggestions of his uniformed 
advisers. It is around his more or less 



devoted head that the howling storms 
of political intrigue rage. Inevitably 
his ambitions run along political lines; 
he wants to have a good record, so 
that when he shall ask the people to 
vote for him his past may be such that 
a sufficient number of them will do so. 
"These remarkably sage observa- 
tions of ours are due to a consideration 
of the problem that confronts a fire com- 
missioner who tries to secure a really 
fireproof headquarters for the fire- 
alarm system. On the one hand the 
firemen keep dinning into his ears the 
undeniable fact that without a fire- 
alarm building absolutely fireproof in 
construction and free from danger 
from surrounding buildings, the city 
is exposed to a very frightful menace. 
Fire stations are burned occasionally, 
and fire-alarm headquarters are not 
immune. A dislocation of the receiv- 
ing of fire alarms might easily lead to 
disasters by fire far greater than even 
those that are already a part of the 
history of American cities." 

Captains to Influence Promotions. 

Chief J. E. Sloan, Newark, N. J., 
will hereafter make no recommenda- 
tions of promotions to the Board of 
Fire Commissioners without first re- 
ceiving satisfactory reports from the 
captains. This decision was reached 
recently, following the submitting of 
three names to the board by the chief 
for promotions. When the nanus were 
read Commissioner Stratton declared 
thai one of the captains had told him 
that one of the men whose name was 
lead oil' was very slow. A discussion 
(hen arose and t lie hoard decided to he 

guided by the captains as well as the 
chief. 



Heaviest January Fire Loss. 



The fire loss of the United States 
and Canada for the month of January, 
1912, as compiled from the carefully 
kept records of The Journal of Com- 
merce of New York, shows a total of 
$35,653,450, the heaviest on record. 

The following table affords a com- 
parison of the losses by fire during 
January with those of the same month 
of 1910 and 1911, together with the 
losses by months during the balance 
of those years: 

1910. 1911. 1912. 

Jan $15,175,400 $21,922,450 $35,653,450 

Feb 15,489,350 16,415,000 

Mar 18.465,500 31,569,800 

Apr 18,091,800 17,670,550 

May 18,823,200 21,422.000 

June... 13,183,600 20,691.950 

July 26,947,900 25,301,150 

Aug 21,570,550 12,662,650 

Sept 11,700,000 11,333,250 

Oct 37,188,300 13,945,000 

Nov 16,407,000 18,680,600 

Dec 21,5i8,000 22,722,650 

T'lsfor V r$234,470,650 $234,337,250 

During the month of January there 
were no less than 536 tires, each of 
which caused an estimated loss of 
$10,000 or over. This is the largest 
number of fires of this size ever re- 
corded in any one month. They were 
widely distributed throughout all sec- 
tions of the country. 

Resides the physical test, all appli- 
cants for positions in the San Kian- 
cisco (ire department must pass a med- 
ical review, an athletic program and a 
very rigid inquiry as to moral charac- 
ter. When those have been passed 
the civil service mental examination 
must be taken. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Springfield, Mass., Discusses Merer Bug. 

Police Chief Wm. J. Quilty of Spring- 
field, Mass., favors merging the Fire 
and Police Departments of that city. 
In a recent speech he is reported to 
have said: 

"Under the proposed new city char- 
ter, which may be accepted, it is sug- 
gested that there be a department 
called the department of public safety. 
I contend that every member should 
be a police officer. This department 
of public safety is to be composed of 
the present police department, fire de- 
partment and Board of Health. Why 
would it not be a good idea to have the 
firemen respond to some of the police 
calls? For instance, supposing a 
woman in Westminster street found a 
burglar in the house. Instead of call- 
ing the police station, let her call the 
Winchester square fire station. A 
squad of four or five men would answer 
the call in one of their pieces of ap- 
paratus and they could surround the 
house, possibly, before the burglar 
could escape. My idea is this: Let 
the people in the residence sections 
call the nearest fire station, and let the 
firemen act as police officers. There is 
but one police station in the city, while 
there is a fire station in every section. 
By this means the fire department 
would not be impaired in the least, and 
personal safety, which is of greater 
importance, would be insured fully as 
much as safety of property. 

"That is to say, let the firemen of 
the department of public safety be de- 
tailed especially for fire service, but 
also be used to suppress other forms 
of disorder. I do not mean to say that 
they should respond to all cases, but 
just in case of emergency." 

It is unlikely, says an exchange, that 
Quilty's suggestion will be put into 
effect. 



Motor Chemical Climbs Nob Hill. 



The Pacific Motor of this city, for 
February, contained the following ac- 
count of the recent American-La 
France motor chemical test: 

"An automobile chemical engine un- 
der test for the San Francisco Fire De- 
partment shot up the steep slope of 
California street hill, doing the dis- 
tance between Leidesdorff and Mason 
streets in one minute and a half. The 



street was crowded from the Mer- 
chants' Exchange building to the Fair- 
mont hotel, at the crest of the hill, the 
spectators taking care to keep well 
within the curb as the car approached. 
Insurance men, firemen, city officials 
and also many interested property 
owners watched the exhibition, in 
which a new automobile fire engine 
proved that the San Francisco hills are 
no longer an obstacle to fire apparatus. 
Chief Thomas Murphy occupied a seat 
beside the driver of the machine, and 
three firemen in uniform stood at the 
rear of the car holding on to a hand 
rail. The engine comprised two tanks 
of eighty gallons capacity each, a reel 
of hose wound full with pipe for the 
chemical engine, and also the machin- 
ery. 

"At a given signal the machine 
started. It fairly jumped off from the 
start, and with a terrific whistle and 
roar it was off up the hillside. 

"The car is the La France automo- 
bile chemical engine, fifty-eight horse- 
power, which the city is buying with 
a similar machine of the Consolidated 
Motor Car Company, now on its way 
from the factory." 

Civil Service Commissioners Amend 
Their Rules. 

The San Francisco Civil Service 
Commissioners have amended the rules 
relating to promotions, so that in fu- 
ture three names will be certified and 
the appointing body given an oppor- 
tunity to make the choice to the end 
that the best possible service may be 
secured for the city. The commission- 
ers believe that the department, hav- 
ing had an opportunity to judge of the 
respective merits of the employes, 
should be allowed to choose between 
them. This rule, however, will not 
apply to original appointments, as the 
Civil Service Commissioners will cer- 
tify but one name, as at present. 

Fire Engine House Burns. 

The fire engine house of the Fitton 
Hose Company, Rockville, Conn., to- 
gether with its contents was burned 
recently, entailing a loss of close to 
310,000. The cause of the fire is not 
known. In the house were a fire en- 
gine, two hose wagons, a fire truck, 
3,000 feet of hose and other fire-fight- 
ing equipments. In addition were lost 



silver trumpets and other trophies won 
by the Fitton hose team years ago, 
when the team traveled about the 
country and took 'part in firemen's 
competitions. So suddenly did the fire 
break out that there was no time to 
save anything. Plans for rebuilding 
are now being discussed. 

Alcazar Theatre. 

Evelyn Vaughan and Bertram Ly- 
tell's very successful engagement at 
the Alcazar comes to a conclusion with 
arevivalof "Billy," commencing next 
Monday evening. This merry offering 
has been selected as the medium of 
Miss Vaughan and Mr. Lytell's fare- 
well appearance because the success 
they scored in it during their previous 
season at the Alcazar gave rise to a de- 
mand for its reproduction that could 
not gracefully be denied. By the crit- 
ics it was pronounced one of the fun- 
niest comedies ever written, and its 
laughter-compelling qualities were en- 
hanced by the work of the players. 

Mr. Lytell will be seen as Billy, Vi- 
ola Leach as his mother, Miss Vaughan 
as his sister, Beth Taylor as his be- 
trothed, Adele Belgarde as her mother, 
Charles Ruggles as his rival, Louis 
Bennison and Burt Wesner as two 
most remarkable seamen, Charles 
Gunn as the steward. Josie Lafontaine 
as the stewardess, Roy Clements as 
the doctor and Edmund Lowe as the 
captain. All the action takes place on 
the main deck of the Florida, and a 
very realistic stage setting is assured. 

An expressman of Portland, Ore., 
the owner of one or two dismal-look- 
ing horses, is looking for a sign painter 
who decorated the nags' sides with this 
"legend: "Oats wanted inside." The 
sign was done in paint that won't 
wash off. 

The millionaire fire department at 
Hillsboro, may use polo ponies as fire 
horses. 



Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1373 East 32nd Street, Oakland 



PACIFIC F1I1KMAN 



Chief Adams Seriously III. 

[From Petaluma Courier of Sunday. February 25.] 

The demonstration and official test 
of the Seagraves auto fire pump given 
Tuesday afternoon by the Gorham En- 
gineering Company of East Oakland 
at their plant came to a disastrous end- 
ing as far as the delegate from Peta. 
luma was concerned. Chief Adams 
and Councilman Fredericks Kercheva' 
and Stradling were present and al' 
were injured, when during the dem- 
onstration the hose, through which the 
water was being pumped under 245 
pound pressure and at the rate of 1125 
gallons of water per minute, broke 
from its moorings and struck with 
great force all within its reach. Chief 
Adams was the most seriously injured. 
He was struck on the back of the head 
with the hose and on the right arm, 
just above the wrist, with the nozzle. 
This blow fractured the chief's arm. 
He was also badly bruised about the 
body. Councilman Fredericks .who, 
with several others, managed to hold 
the hose until the pump could be 
stopped, received several bruises. 

Councilman Kercheval received a 
badly sprained wrist, and Councilman 
Stradling escaped with a few bruises. 
Chief Adams and Councilman Kerche- 
val were taken in an auto of the Gor- 
ham Company to the offices of Dr. 
Kelley, in Oakland, where their in- 
juries were dressed. All of the mem- 
bers of the party returned home Tues- 
day evening on the 7:08 train. 

The fire chiefs of San Francisco, Los 
Angeles and Napa were present at the 
test. The Los Angeles delegation were 
in the house inspecting the pump when 
the accident occurred, and were just 
coming out, but retreated when they 
saw what was wrong. 

Harry Murphy of this city was an 
interested spectator, and he stated if 
he had not ducked he would have been 
hit in the head by the hose. 

The chief has had his share of acci- 
dents in the past. Some time ago, 
while fighting a lire on the Prince 
building, he fell through the skylight 
on the Courier building and landed on 
top of the linotype, badly damaging 
that machine. 

He states, however, that this is the 
most serious accident which he has 
suffered. 



FOR BETTER FIRE PROTECTION 

IN THE VILLAGE! 

A SEAGRAVE 2-WHEEL HAND-DRAWN CHEMICAL 




GORHAM ENGINEERING AND FIRE APPARATUS CO. 



SEATTLE 
216 Jackson Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 

48 Fremont Street 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 S. Olive Street 



American Rubber iV\fg. Co. 



9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories — Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 

WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 

Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose, Brass 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Department Supplies 



Tire 
with 



Fisk 



When you 
tire of risk 



PAC1 !•' I C K 1 l: E .M A N 



PACIH 




.IREMAN 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K MACK Editor and proprietoi 

To whom all checks and money orders .should 

be made payable. 

Hi; PRESTON Business Manager 



Editorial Rooms and Business Office, 479 Turk Street, 
Sad Francisco. Telephone Franklin C867. 



EnLered as second -class matter March 21, 1908, at thf 
PoBtoftice at San Kranciaco. Cal., under thd Act of Con- 

trress of March 3. 1879. 



SATURDAY MARCH 2. 1912 



Houston is busy clearing away the debris, 
preparatory to rebuilding: cotton plants. The 

mayor announces thai outside aid is not nec- 
essary. 

Tliis is moving week for Fire Deportment 
Headquarters to their new home on Market 
street, near Larkin. The office force, during 
week, were endeavoring to restore order out 
of chaos. 

Johti D. Rockefeller expressed a desire to 
take a ride on Tarrytown's new automobile 
fire engine. The heads of the company pro- 
pose so make Rockefeller an honorary mem- 
ber of the department. 

The Fireman's Herald of New York cele- 
brated its thirty-fifth year of its existence a 
couple of weeks ago. Strictly speaking, it. is 
the only real fire journal in the country. The 
Pacific Fireman wishes it continued success. 



At Spokane, Wash., Mrs. John King would 
not permit the firemen to enter by the front 
door when her dwelling was on fire. She said 
she did not want to have her carpets soiled 
and compelled the men to go around to a rear 
entrance. They finally reached the cellar and 
extinguished the fire with chemicals. 

The question of a modern fire alarm system 
for Los Angeles has again become acute It 
is likely that something definite will be done 
soon, as the fire department will not permit 
the city authorities to go to sleep over the 
need of installing a system to meet the Los 
Angeles requirements. 



port in time when the bell rings. The com- 
mission has taken no action as yet on the pe- 
tition, but probably Lhe raise asked for will 
be granted. 

Reorganizing the N. Y. Department. 

Under the above startling announcement a 
late issue of the System Magazine says: 
"Governmment effort to solve the problem of 
preventing fire waste, a problem most acute, 
because the total losses for the months of 
1911 exceed thoseof the corresponding period 
in 1910 by $30,000, is being helped forwardby 
the action of various communities. Among 
these, the most important of the month, per- 
haps, was the passage by the New York leg- 
islal ure of a bill reorganizing the lire depart- 
ment of New York City. 

"Instead of a single chief, there will be 
five, one for each borough, chosen from among 
the present deputy chiefs and answerable only 
to the lire commissioner. The latter 19 invest- 
ed with new and larger powers, having com- 
plete supervision over all buildings, with 
authority to declare any building or inclosure 
a nuisance or danger, and t<> o icier ii s removal 
or reconstruction, Heis given authority also 
to investigate fires and start criminal prose- 
cutions. 

"On a par whh these radical changes in the 
way of fighting tire, the new law establishes 
a municipal fire prevention bureau, whose 
chief will be an expert selected by the com- 
missioner either from within or without the 
department. It. will be the business of the 
bureau to make inquiries and experiments to 
determine the best and cheapest means of 
making existing buildings fire-resisting and 
providing safeguards against loss of life. 
In general, the bureau will provide expert 
council for the fire commissioner's office." 

It will be recalled that Chief Tinker re- 
signed a few months ago to start a private 
fire prevention bureau. 

Our Great Fire Waste. 



Service as a fireman for twenty years does 
not entitle a man to a pension in Louisville, 
Ky., Miys an exchange. Under a decision of 
the Court of Appeals, recently, the court 
holds void that section of the firemen's pen- 
sion act which authorizes the payment of pen- 
sions to firemen after twenty years' service, 
and says that a pension can be granted only 
in case of death or disability. 

A recent exchange says the Alameda Fire 
Department have petitioned the tire commis- 
sion to raise their pay from $15 to $1^5 a month. 
The call men are fined for non-attendance ai 
drills and for failure to repor.t at fire alarm-. 
The tines vary from $2.50 to $5, and the men 
represent in their petition that their fines fre- 
quently amount to more than the pay for an 
entire month, as they are working at various 
employments and frequently are unable lore- 



Speaking of the enormous fire waste in this 
country, Franklin H. Wentworth for Boston, 
a well-known authority on fire prevention, in 
the Insurance and Investment News of Feb- 
ruary 22, says: 

"The fire waste touches the pocket of 
every man, woman and child in the nation; it 
strikes as surely but as quiet 1} as indirect 
taxation; it merges with the cost of every- 
thing we eat and wear. The profligate burn- 
ing everv year of $250,000,000 in Lhe value of 
the work of the men s hands means the in- 
evitable impoverishment of the nation. What 
if we were to lose that sum annually out of the 
National Treasury, or in wheat, or corn, or 
cotton? A loss of $250,000,000 a year means 
$30,000 per hour for every hour of the twenty- 
four. We are burning the equivalent of a 
comfortable $5,000 home every tin minutes. 
This fearful loss, spread over the entire busi- 
ness world of America, is beginning to mani- 
fest its impoverishing blight. The people 
feel it without yet being awake to its cause. 
Their awakening is re larded by the prevalence 
of the foolish notion that the insurance o( m- 
panies pay this colossal tax." 



Shall Uncle Sam Do It? 

Under the above caption a local paper edi- 
torially sa_\ s; 

"Many people ash why fire losses in the 
United States are so ^reat and insurance 
rates so high. In Germany, the government 
insures your dwelling and makes building 
regulations. In this country private insur- 
ance companies, for profit, insure your dwell- 
ing and then try to influence legislation to se- 
cure building regulations which will bring 
about a reduction of lire rUk and loss. Does 
mil our method involve not onlv great •■■ 
of property, but also frightful less of life, as 
witness the Triangle Shirt Waist factory fire 
in New York City? 

"Maybe there would be greater security to 
life and property if the same g< vernmenl 
which prescribes building regulations bIfo 
paid losses. It would learn by experience, 
wouldn't it? Permitting the building of fire 
traps increases not only the hazard to the 
occupants of that building, but also of adja- 
cant property and sometimes of a whole city. 
Which policy is wiser, Germany's or ours?'*. 

Across the Bay. 

A fire broke out at 769 Taylor avenue, Ala- 
meda, Wednesday, Feb. 29, which caused a 
loss of $1000. No. 2 hose should have the 
credit of being a live bunch by getting two 
streams on the blaze, under the instructions 
of Asst. Chief W. D. Steinmetz. The ad- 
jacent property was saved without beirg 
scorched. 

Fire totally destroyed the Occidental hotel, 
an old Hayward landmark, Saturday morning. 
The loss is estimated at $10,000, covered by 
insurance. A stiff wind was blowing, which 
fanned the flames, and soon the entire roof 
was ablaze. The pressure was verj weak and 
the fire wasbeyond control before the firemen 
could render effective aid. Crossed electric 
wires were supposed to have started the fire. 

Chief Ball petitioned the council for an ap- 
propriation of $15,000 to build three fire 
houses. The city owns two lots at the pres- 
ent time, and Chief Ball suggests that a lot 
at College and Claremont be purchased with 
the proceeds from the sale of property en 
Sixty-second street. Five thousand dollars is 
to be set apart for each of these buildings. 

Ordinance for Employes' Fire Ftotecticn 

Supervisor Gallagher has introduced in or- 
dinance, specially framed, to prevent the pos- 
sibility of duplicating in this city the Triangle 
shirtwaist factory firu holocaust of New Yorfc 

City, which provides for the protection of 
peo| It working in factories, etc. The ordi 
nance carries the following | rovbions: 

In all industrial establishments there s-hall 
be a fire drill once per month, in which all lire 
apparatus shall be actually used and the es- 
capes tested. 

During hours of employment all do< is lead- 
ing to fire escapes, stairways or exiis shall 
h. left unlocked and in condition for instant 

one. No boxes or obstructions shall he jil.d 

before exits or in aisles leading to them. 

Violation of these provisionsshall constitute 
a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine of be- 
tween $25 and $500. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



San Francisco Fire Commissioners. 

REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE. 
SAN FRANCISCO, FEBRUARY, 29 1912. 

To the Hon., the BoardofFire Commissioners; 
Gentlemen: -Your Administrative Com- 
mittee respectfully submits the following re- 
port of matters that have come before it for 
consideration since the last regular meeting 
of the board, together with its recommenda- 
tions for action thereon by your Honorable 
Board: 

Application of Harry Newman, truckman truck 11, 
for salary during disability resulting from an injury to 
his knee received while rtspondins to an alarm of fire 
with his company on January 31. 19U. Allowed salary on 
the recommendation "f his battalion chief. 

Report of Hydi antmnn Rice, relative to the breaking: of 
a hydrant by an automobile of the John Bruner Com* 
pany. at the northeast corner of Fillmore and Sutter 
streets, on the 17th inst.. the cost of repairs to the same 
amounting to $29 90. Filed and the secretary directed to 
file a c'aim fur said amuunt. 

Communication from chief engineer, submitting a list of 
fire alarm boxes that are required to be installed. Ap- 
proved and a copy of s^me ordered forwarded to the De- 
partment of Electricity with a request that these boxes 
be installed as si.on as possible. 

Communication from John Bulger. United States In- 
spector 1st District of California, relative to the number 
of engineers, pilots and marine firemen for fire boats. 
Filed. 

Communication from chief engineer, submitting a re- 
port of Buttalion Chief Cook relative to the fire boat Den- 
nis T. Sullivan stopping while on the bay on the 17ih inst. 
Filed. 

Communication from tlie Market Street Homestead As- 
sociation and ( 'orbett Avenue Improvement Club, request- 
ing that a building be erect* d and a chemical company in- 
stalled at Seventeenth and Old streets. Taken under 
consideration and the secretary directed to send reply re- 
questing representatives of said clubs to be present when 
this matter comes up for consideration. 

Communication from the chief engineer recommending 
that the Board of Supervisors take the necessary steps to 
dispose of old junk, such as scrap iron, rubber tires, cot' 
t >n hose, old barrels, rope, etc., belonging to this de] art 
merit that is of no further use therein. Approved and so 
mdered. 

Submitting a report from the chief engineer in the mat- 
ter of the claim of the Electric Agencies Company for 
200 single stroke bells furnished the Department of Elec- 
tricity, amounting to S"50, and which was referred to this 
depa-tment by the finance committee of the Board of 
Supervisors for advice as to the efficiency and economy of 
this particular instrument. Approved and ordered for- 
warded to the finance committee. 

Communication from Mauricr Higains. tiuekman truck 
4. requesting that he be granted a leave of absence for 
three months, with pay, on account of sickness, from 
March I, 1912. Granted. 

Communication from Marsden Manson. city engineer 
i(l reply to communication from this board of the9lh inst.. 
relative to extra precaution being taken to insim- the 
safety of the high preasure water mains in certain locali- 
ties; also regarding ihehydinnt bondp. FiNd, 

Communication from the Civil Service Commission. 

authorizing the Board to make temporary appointments 
fur the month of March in certain positions for which no 
civil service eligible lists exist at the present time. Filed. 

Communication from the Superintendent of Engines, 
submitting recommend at inn in reganl te certain ■ nip I' yes 
of the corpomtion yard. I iled. 

From Eugene A. Carroll, tendering his resignation as 
mi mogi apher-typewiiter in the depari rnent Accepted 

Prom t.h.'Civil Sei vice Comn.is inn. mi ify ing the name 
«f Archibald McA. Conley from its civil service eligible 
list for appointment in this depai tment as stenogrnpher- 

t , pawriter. Appointed, 

rVom the acting physician and surgeon, submit ting 
weekly re [in i I <<f nick and injured member >i. I- ikd. 

Communication from chief engineer submitting n re- 
port of mi accident whereby a. Woods/ord. r plasterer, 

was struck by his automobile and injured while respond 

Ins loan alarm of fire on the 24th inst. Filed. 
Communication from the chief engineer, rat ommandlnfl 



that the Spring Valley Water Company be requested to 
extend the 8-inch La Honda water mains along the follow- 
ing streets, in order that hydrants may be connected 
thereto: Balboa street, from 6th to 12th avenue; Ansa 
street, from 8th to 12ih avenue; 12th avenue, from Ansa 
to Fulton: 10th avenue, from Ansa to Fulton; llthavenue, 
from Fulton to Geary street; 16th avenue, from Geary to 
Ansa street. Approved and so ordered. 

Communication from chief engineer, recommending 
that the Spring Valley Water Company be requested to 
install the following hydrants: Northeast corner 10th 
avenue and Ansa; east side 11th avenue. ISO feet north of 
Ansa; northwest corner 11th avenue and Cabrillo street. 
Approved and so ordered. 

Communication from the superintendent of engines, re- 
porting that the automobile for the use of the chief en- 
gineer, furnished by the Pierce Arrow Sales Company, 
conforms with the specificationstherefor and recommend- 
ing that the same be accepted. Approved and so ordered. 

DEPARTMENT FIREHOATS 

Acting upon the advice of the United Statos Steam- 
boat Inspectors, as per their attached letter, your Admin- 
istrative Committee respectfully recommends that the 
navigation crew of each fire boat have the following com- 
plement of men: 1 master and pilot, 2 licensed engineers. 

2 marine firemen, and in addition to the above for relief 
purposes, 1 licensed master and pilot. 1 licensed engineer. 
1 marine fireman. 

1 he appointment of the additional master and pilot, en- 
gineer and fireman is for the purpose of permitting the 
operation of the plan of giving days off. 

It is to be noted in this connection that while the laws 
governing steamboat inspection call for "3 deck hands 
(and 9 additional when required)," the duties of the deck 
hands are discharged by members of the fire company, 
consisting of 12 hosemen and 2officers. 

The committee therefore recommends that each boat 
have a complement of five men, of the respective ranks 
and positions above designated, and in addition thereto 
there may be employed three men of the ranks and posi- 
tions indicated. Under this recommendation of your com- 
mittee there will be employed, for the purpose of naviga- 
tion, on both boats. 13 men. as against the present number 
of -0. By this reduction of the navigation force we dis- 
pense with the following positions: 1 master and pilot, 

3 engineers. 3 firemen. 

We recommend therefore, in accordance with the fore- 
going, that the services of the following named members 
of the navigation crews be dispensed with after the 29.h 
day of February. 1912: Pilot J. J. Menney. Engineers 
Thomas Daly. Charles Tiernan. T. J. Colleran, Firemen P 
Cushley, William Davock. Patrick Minehan. 

Your committee further recommends that the services 
of Wm. H. Gleeson as superintendent of engines be dis- 
pensed with and that the Civil Service Commission be re- 
quested to certify the name of an eligible for this posi- 
tion, and in this behalf we direct attention lo the fact that 
we are advised that heretofore the position had been 
fill d urdf r regular certification from ihe Departmert of 
Civil Service by an eligible from the genet al machinist's 
list Inasmuch as no examination has been held for the 
position of superintendent of engines by the Civil Service 
CommtFsivn we assume the fact to be that this certifica- 
tion was irregular ai d that the proper method of proced- 
ure would have been u certification of an eligible for ap- 
pointment to the position of superintendent of engines. 
DEPARTMENT STABLES 

Your committee also recommends tliat (he services of 
Patrick u'Cnrmeii as. temporary spperihtendentof horses 
!..■ di. |>ens<d with ui.d that Km ert Han is, driver engine 
;i? w I o formerly held thisposition.be assigned to duty 

as such. Also, that upon the representation of the super- 
intendent of engines, the pervicta of J J. Gallagher as 
temporary Bteamfliter at the Corporation Yard be dls 

pel <d with and that James J. Kenney be temporarU] 
appointed to this position. 

I see a mati pushing his way through 1 he lines 
Of ihe cops where a ftre brightly glimmers 

;ttnl shines. 
"Chief Murphy?" I ask, but a fireman replies, 
* 'Oh, no, why, t hat's one of those new spaper 

guys." 

There is trouble at Lob Angeles over thi 
use of the firedepartment'ts phone l>\ firemen 
for flirting purposes. 



Planting of the Poppies. 

San Francisco, February 28, 1912. 

Editor Pacific Fireman. 

Would you be kind enough to insert the fol- 
lowing in your next issue? 

On next Saturday the hillssurrounding Noe 
Valley are to be planted with Poppies. The 
honor of planting the first Poppy has been 
conferred upon Honorable John Farley, pres- 
ident of the Noe Valley Improvement Club, 
assisted by Mrs. Burke. 

Thos. McLaughlin, 

Corporation Yard. 



The Man and the Mule. 

Over the field slowly paraded the man and 
th.e mule. Or to speak precisely, the mule 
and the man, for the mule headed the proces- 
sion while his master brought up the rear. A 
little plow acted as underground connection 
between the two, while a lifeline slung around 
the neck of the man and ending between the 
jawbone of the ass completed the circuit. 
Connection being properly established, ihe 
man sends the following thought waves over 
the lifeline. 

"Bill, you're a mule, the son of a jackass, 
aud I'm a man made in the image of God. 
Yet, here we work hitched to each other, year 
in and year out I often wonder if you work 
for me or I for vou. Sometimes I think this 
is a partnership between a mule and a fool, 
for surely I work the harder of the two. 
Plowing here wecoverthe same distance, but 
you do it on four legs and I on two. So 
mathematically speaking. I do twice as much 
work per leg than you do." 

Immunity from work on their vacations was 
granted the Pasadena fire horses recently, 
when at the meeting of the park, police and 
fire commissioners it was voted to make an 
allowance of $4 a month for each horse for 
the time it is laid off for a rest at 'he city 
farm. The question involved was whether 
the appropriation for the k< ep of the hi rses 
while on the farm should he paid from the fire 
funds, and the animals be allowed complete 
rest from labor, or whether the animals might 
be put to farm work for the time, and Ihe 
cost of their feeding charged to the farm ac- 
count. It was decided that a change of lalior 
would not constitute sufficient vacation, i nd 
the fire department agreed to make the ap- 
propriation from its funds. 

A Pennsylvania woman peeked oul of hei 
bathroom door and saw a burglar gathering 
up her diamonds. Without waiting lo rinse 
the lather off she let off a ft- hoop mid -i;-n- d 

il'ier him. He k nne Itmk — with miv v i 

and fled. She chased him ihrough the gaidin 

md over, into the next block, where she cul- 
tured and li- Id him till the police came Tin u 
she fuinti d from > nibarrassment . Bui iihl 
think of il" 1 embarraswmi nt »f the i""t i i 
officers and the man who was chased No 
wonder he gave up the diamonds, 
God's mere) he didn't give up the ghost. 

•■Yon think she « i l marrj i ■ '1 

consider it probable. Her Ihi* t it- hand U tt 
tjome bobacn hut not em w h lo gel 

.in) thing w ith. " 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening, Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Reach Nurseries, take Castro street ear to 23rd. or 

Mission, 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



EAGLESON & CO. 

1158 MARKET ST. 

PHONE MARKET 5417 

MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS 



AND SHIRTS 

Guaranteed Navy Flannel Firemen's 
Shirts 

alio 1 12 South Spring Street, Los Angeles 



Gold and Silver Trimmincrs. All Kindsof Gold Embroider- 
ing Done to Order. 

Telephone Douglas 2600 

BLOOM BROS. Inc. 

MAT A1ND CAP FACTORY 

Military and Navy Caps a Specialty 

109 NEW MONTGONERY ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAl 



FIREMEN EAT AT THE 

...B. &. D. RESTAURANT... 

Where you get the best for the least money. 

H. O. DALBEV. Mfjr. 
178 THIRD ST., San Francisco 

OPEN TILL MIDNIGHT. Phone Douglas 2546 



\A/M. F. EGAN 

M, R. C. V. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D 

1155 OOLDEN GATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 11? and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 

M. L. M1LCOVICH. Prop. 

Martin's Restaurant and Grill 

1533 STEINER STREET 

Near Gearv San Francisco 



Empress Theatre. 

Vaudeville de luxe will be found the 
coming week at the Empress, starting 
with the matinee Sunday afternoon. 
Headed by a feature act from Barnum 
and Bailey's circus, the Empress will 
present an all-star bill. 

"A Touch of High Life" is an elab- 
orately mounted playlet of New York 
life presented by Ruth Francis & Co. 

Brady & Mahoney, character come- 
dians who deal in laughter in whole- 
sale quantities, will entertain with a 
skit called "The Fireman and the Fore- 
man." 

Always popular, the Three Keltons 
will return after an absence of several 
years in Europe. The act introduces 
Miss Gladys Kelton, who holds the dis- 
tinction of being America's foremost 
xylophonist. 

Gertrude Holmes and Robert Bu- 
chanan, one of the most attractive 
musical duos in vaudeville, will offer 
some protean studies, the most pictur- 
esque of which will be "The Girl of 
1847." 

Geo. Auban & Co., a European ec- 
centric act, composed of singing and 
instrumental selections, and Bostwick 
and Randolph, in "The Baggage Man 
and the Chorus Girl's' ' act, full of pat- 
ter and eccentric dancing, will com- 
plete the bill. 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



The telephone operators in New York City 
handle 1N0.000 calls everv rush hour They will 

■ onnect you with any oue ol ■' subsi rtbi re 

in half a minute. 

Ask the exchange manager how he can handle 
all these calls, and he will tell you tersely. "By 
saving the seconds." 

"Schedule time" is the keynote of American 
industry. That means Howard time. There's 
always somebody higher up holding a Howard 
Watch on the job— demanding the Howard type 
of accuracy and punctuality. 

The Howard is the one watch in the world 
wholly adapted m modern progress. It has 
i he precise construe -lion and the scientific ad- 
justment. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pay for it. 

The price of each watch— from the l.-jew.-l 
(double roller) in a Crescent Extra or Jas. Boas 
Extra gold-ftlled case at $40, to the 23-jewi 
$150. and the Edward Howard model at J850— 
is fixed at the factors and a printed ticket at- 
tached. , 

Find the Howard jeweler in your town and 
talk to him. Not every jeweler can sell you a 
Howard. The jeweler who can is a good man 
to know. 

Admiral Slgsbee has written a little l 1%. 

"The Log of the Howard Watch." giving the 
record Of his own Howard In the U. S. Navy. 

You'll enjoy it. Drop us a post-card, Dept. N, 

and we'll send you b ■ opy 

HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston. Mass 



Phone Home C 2458 



T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 
71 WALLER ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 

SALVAR 

( 1 Will Save) 

The Greatest BLOOD REMEDY io the World 

— WILL CURE- — 

RHEUMATISM 

Acute or Chronic 



Lamanet Bros, blood poison 



Acquired or Hereditary 



Telephone Douglas 287 1 



Home C 4992 



WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 



WARRANT BROKERS 



630 KEARNY STREET 



COR. COMMERCIAL 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Is the place of all places to get the 
very latest and best in the way of 

FIREMEN'S REGULATION SHIRTS 
FIREMEN'S TURNOUT SUITS 
GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS 
HATS & UNDERWEAR, ETC. 

524 BROADWAY STREET 

SAIN FRANCISCO 



Phone Market 1795 



Home J 1795 



JOE. H. ROSENBERG 
CCiutl aitfi iHilitarii Sailor 

73 ELLIS ST .. Near Powell 
Louis Frankenbers. formerly with Rosenblum & Abraham, Manaaer 

Home phone S 2517 

The Little Emporium 

L. R1ZN1C Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 

2296-98 GEARY STREET 

Near Brodentk 
Telephone West 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 



PARAL\S1S 
CATARRH 
MALARIA 



Diseases of Liver, Kidneys and Bladder 



Diseases Peculiar to Women 



$10.00 FOR 40 TO 60 DAYS' TREATMENT 

Call or Write for our 100 Page BooHi I 

TO THE PUBLIC 

In offering Salvar to the public, we do so 
with perfect confidence, and state publicly our 
willingness to have our remedy thoroughly tested 
in any fair and equitable manner, in the treat- 
ment of all diseases we claim it will relieve, and 
we will abide by a decision so given and dis- 
continue its sale at once if it is found different in 
any particular from what it is represented to be. 

SEITZ & MILLS, Agents 
1402 Alarket St., near 10th, San Francisco 




VOL. IX. -NO. 10. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Birmingham's Motor-driven 
Fire Apparatus. 

A correspondent of this paper, at 
present residing in Birmingham, Ala., 
who takes great interest in fire mat- 
ters, sends us the following clipping, 
taken from the Birmingham LeJger 
of February 25, with the request that 
we reproduce it in full in our columns, 
as he thinks it will interest many of 
the readers of the Pacific Fireman, 
now that San Francisco is on the eve 
of motorizing her firedepartment. We 
quote: 

With twenty-three pieces of motor 
fire equipment. Birmingham enjoys 
the signal honor of having the largest 
motorized firedepartment in the coun- 
try. This within itself is enough to 
proclaim Birmingham's progressive 
spirit and stamp the Magic City as a 
leader of modern ideas and civic de- 
velopments. A movement started by 
Chief A. V. Bennett of the firedepart- 
ment several years ago, which met 
with hearty co-opera! ion by the city 
commissioners, to motorize the firede- 
partment of Birmingham, culminated 
in the acquiring of twenty-three pieces 
of motor equipment by the city of Bir- 
mingham. That the entire depart- 
ment of Birmingham will be motorized 
within the next live years is the belief 
of even the most conservative. 

The motor steam engine in use by 
the Birmingham department is equip- 
ped with a 110-horse power motor, 
which propels the steam lire engine, 
giving it a capacity of 800 gallons the 
minute, the water pressure the square 
inch being 147 pounds. With every 



other modern device known added to 
this machine, and weighing 14,365 
pounds, it has a speed of fifty miles 
an hour. 

In addition to this well equipped 
machine, the department boasts of 18 
motor driven combination chemical and 
hose wagons, two triple combination 
motor driven machines, consisting of 
a fire engine, hose wagon and chemi- 
cal engine, each of which is one piece 
of apparatus, and two automobiles, 
one used by Chief Bennett and the 
other by Assistant Chief Walton. 

The eighteen motor combination 
chemical hose wagons are distributed 
in various sections of the city. They 
are so distributed as to warrant the 
covering of long distance runs in the 
event help should be needed by subur- 
ban stations. Then, too, a great many 
suburban stations have these ma- 
chines, especially where houses are 
scattered. 

The aggregate number of these com- 
bination chemical-hose wagons did 
away with 36 horses. The cost of 
feeding these 36 horses averaged $16 
per month per horse, or $566 for t lu- 
entire number per month. One of 
these motor chemical-hose wagons can 
be operated at a cost of $3.20 for the 
machine, which makes a total of $ 17.60 
for the operation of the entire number, 
Thus it is readily seen that asavingof 
$518.40 has been acquired hj the citj 
from these pieces alone. the ol bet 
machines have likewise been operated 
at a lower cost than horse drawn ma- 
chines. 

One of the triple combination motor 
machines put out of commission six 
horses and seven men. Instead of fif- 



teen men operating three different 
pieces of apparatus, eight men now 
handle this triple combination ma- 
chine. This combination does away 
with three separate and distinct pieces 
of equipment, namely: Fire engine, 
chemical engine and hose wagon. 

These triple combination machines 
have given thorough satisfaction to the 
Birmingham department, and have 
proven conclusively that they can be 
operated at a cost less than horse drawn 
apparatus. 

The two automobiles provided for 
the fire chiefs and the assistant fire 
chief are of vast benefit to the public, 
as well as enabling these officials to 
arrive on the scene of a fire as quickly 
as possible. 

The remaining number of pieces of 
equipment consists of horse drawn 
pieces. The department now has eight 
steam fire engines, drawn by seven- 
teen horses, two hook and ladder 
truck, drawn by six horses, a chemical 
engine and several other, pieces of 
smaller equipment. Instead of sixty 
horses, as was the case before the ad- 
dition of motor apparatus, the depart- 
ment now has only 20 horses. 

There are nineteen stations in the 
fifteen square miles of Birmingham, 
Thee stations are in charge of 167 
firemen, all of whom are experienced 
and well trained. Some of the men in 
the local department have been in 
service in the local department for 
twenty years. The captains ami head 
linesmen are all picked by the chief 
and all are especially fitted for their 
respective dutii . There are no lieu- 
tenants. 

There are 785 fire plugs in Greater 



PACIFIC FIR E M A N 



Birmingham. These plugs are so ar- 1 Chief Bennett. Here is what the chief 
ranged as to give an adequate water ] said when he compared the old system 
supply to every section of the city when I to the new: 

the fire department is called. The, "With no good roads, the streets 
plugs are of the best type manufac- poorly lighted, the most of which had 



tured and the fire hose may be easily 
adjusted. 

To render prompt alarms of fires 
there are 101 alarm boxes in the dis- 



no lights, three small fire stations, 
which were poorly equipped, I en- 
tered the fire department of Birming- 
ham. From the time of my first day's 
trict. These, too, are placed in vari- duty I have longed for a motorized lire c jty would have a greater number of 
ous sections of the city. With this department. Automobiles were not in experienced men available in case of a 
i mmber of alarm boxes, together practical use at the time of my enter- serious conflagration, such as the 



Seattle Wants a Two-Shift System. 

The members of the Seattle Fire 
Department are trying to have the city 
adopl the twelve-hour or two-shift sys- 
tem in the department. While the 
proposed change would require about 
fifty additional men, it is argued that 
the active force would at all times be 
in better condition for service and the 



with the telephone, the fire laddies re- 
ceive their calls. 



ing the department, but as the ma- North Seattle fire of two years ago. 
chine progressed in workmanship, and The proposition has been indorsed by 
The firemen have 50, 000 feet of hose, as they became more and more in use, a number of Seattle improvement 
or about 9A miles, with which to fight I realized that some .lay every pro- cra bs. 
When Chief Bennett became gressive city in the United States 



Chief Adams Much Better. 
Fire Chief Adams was much im- 



fire. 

chief of the fire department in 19061 would be using motor fire machines. 

there were only 3,000 feet of hose, or "When the Birmingham depart- 

a little less than a mile. ment put into practical use its first P roved lasl S £ urd *?' and ' s ™ 

The nineteen stations of Binning- motor fire machine, it was with a cer- '"« " :,s,1 - v - "lesphnts wer e taken ofl 
ham-the property and equipment- tain amount of pride that I looked on and his arm put in a plaster-pari 
are valued approximately at $314,- the acquisition of this machine. The Most of the soreness has left his body 
253.81, the property being valued at motor fire machine has proven its and he 18 able to move without 
$91,000,000 and the equipment at worth to Birmingham and I hope to An exchange says marked pro 
$234,674.75. This makes one of the see the entire system motorized in the is being made in the development of 
most valuable fire departments in the near future." the Los Angeles Fire Department along 

world, according to the size and popu- , Thechief is an affable man. Power- j modern lines and the obtaining oi the 
lation of Birmingham. ful in stature, a Roman nose that be- highest efficiency. Horse-drawn fire 

In Chief A. V. Bennett Birmingham comes a man of his grace, a thickhead apparatus is being displaced by motor- 
has one of the most versatile fire of iron grey hair, with a close cropped driven vehicles, and the policy has 
chiefs in the states. He entered the moustache— is Chief Bennett. He is been adopted of installing all machines 
local department a raw recruit Sep- a well read man, educated, refined, of the latter type in the future, so that 
tember 23, 1890. being assigned to He is pleasing and bears every essen- the change, while slow, will be ccm- 
what was then Hose Company No. 5, tial of a true man. plete. The installation of new hy- 

which was afterward closed and re- Assistant Chief W. P. Walton is an drants is going forward rapidly every 
opened as Company No. 6. able one. He became a member of month, and several new auto stei 

The department at that time consist- the fire department in 1889, and since will be added within a short time 
ed of only three companies, known as that time has been with it continuous- several additional aerial trucks for the 
North Side. South Side and West End. ly. In 1892 he was made captain of down-town district. 
The apparatus in use at that time con- the department, and in 19C6 be was 
sisted of three hose reels, two small appointed to assistantchief of the fire 
fire engines and an old-style ladder department. Assistant Chief Walton 
truck, the latter of which required the is a practical fireman, having fitted 
combined efforts of a majority of the himself by experience to grapple with 



The officials oi the Seattle Fire De- 
partment are invi - ! another 
df alleged incendiaiism, growing 
out of a fire in a Pike street building 
recently. A studio, in which the L»li tt 
firemen of the department to erect. ),the many complex probl mapresented originated was found to be I 
The other two departments were as in the performance of his duty, 
meagerly equipped as the South Side C. H. Albertson, secretary to Chief 
station. Bennett, is a capable lieutenant. He 
Chief Bennett relates an experience is thorough in his work and has a prac- 
when his company was responding to tical knowledge of the fire departi 
a call alarm at night at South Four- With a department thoroughly mod- 
teen th street, arid the road was missed, lern, a chief who has studied the lire 
there being no lighted streets and | problem in other cities as well as his 

good roads at that time. The result own, an able assistant chief, a capable 

ureat Seventh and Figueroa streets. 

This change, a Los Angeles paper 



with inflammable films, w hile the Hoi r 
was saturated with kerosene. The 
property was consideral ly dan t 
and highly insun d. 

The plan of Los Angeles to build a 
firehouse at Seventh s.nd Beaten 
streets has been abandoned, and plans 
are being made to erect a new sti net- 



was the capsizing of the hose reel into 
a ditch. It took all of the firemen to 
extricate the piece of apparatus. 
"Things are different now," says 



etary, together with 167 brave fire- 
men, Birmingham indeed has the right 
to proclaim the most efficient fire de- 
partment in the world. 



states, cost the city J9C0, owing to 
plans for the first building having 1 een 
made already. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Of more than ordinary importance 
is the Alcazar's announcement for the 
coming week. "The Desert," a drama 
of satire and sentiment by Clay M. 
Greene and Laura Hewett Greene, 
will be given its first presentation on 
any stage in the O'Farrell-street play- 
house next Monday evening, and the 
personal popularity of the authors 
promises to make the event unusually 
interesting in a social sense as well as 
theatrically. The Bohemian Club, of 
which Mr. Greene is one of the oldest 
members, will be strongly represented 
at the premier performance, and 
friends of his gifted collaborator are 
also certain to be present in force. 
The new play will not suffer for lack 
of earnestness on the stage or good 
will in the audience. Great care was 
exercised in suitably casting the new 
play. Alice Fleming, an actress of 
prominence in the East, was specially 
engaged to portray Sahara. An elab- 
orate scenic production is promised. 

Empress Theater. 

"The Picture of Dorian Grey," a 
dramatization by Edward Davis, of the 
novel by the late Oscar Wilde, will be 
the headline attraction at the Empress, 
commencing with the matinees Sunday 
afternoon. Sydney Grant, vaude- 
ville's most popular reconteur, was 
made so by New York's ultra-fashion- 
able, whose demands upon him were 
frequent and insistant. One of the 
foremost character actors in vaude- 
ville, Lew Welch and a highly capable 
cast in support, will present "Levin- 
sky's Old Shoes." Mme. Melia and 
Mons. Dorys of the Opera Ballet, 
Paris, will present a series of sensa- 
tional Parisian dances. Leo Beers, 
pianiste, offers piano patter, songs and 
stories. Lew Delmore, clever juggler 
and patterer, will juggle eccentric 
hats and most anything that isn't 
nailed on the stage. Adlerand Arline, 
in a "New Idea," have a treat com- 
posed of singing, dancing, etc. Johnny 
Kilbane, who lately acquired the title 
of champion featherweight of the 
world, throuRh his defeat of Abe At- 
tel, will conclude a record-breaking en- 
gagement with all the performances 
Sunday. 

It rained the other day, and Mary went out 
and fcirg-ot her robbers, and now Mary is in 
heaven. 



FOR BETTER FIRE PROTECTION 
in the: village: 

a seagrave 2-wheel hand-drawn chemical 




GORHAM ENGINEERING AND FIRE APPARATUS CO. 



SEATTLE 
216 Jackson Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Street 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 S. Olive Street 



American RubberMfg. Co. 



9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories— Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 



WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 



Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose, Brass 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Department Supplies 



Tire 
with 



Pi ck Whenyou 

JL I*3*V tire of risk 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



pACIFI 




IREMAN 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 
BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 



several years, vouches for the state- 
ment. 



Want Fire Protection. 



Editorial Rooms and Business Otnce. 479 Turk Street. 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 



Entered as second-class matter March 21. 1908. at the 
Postoffice at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
Rress of March 3. 1879. 



SATURDAY 



MARCH 9. 1912 



A special meeting was called for 
5:30 Friday, to consider the advisabil- 
ity of increasing the fireboat crews two 
men each. Other matters of impor- 
tance will also be brought up. 

The "ghost walked" (as the actors 
say) last Wednesday, and the firemen 
are again happy that they can pay the 
butcher, the baker, the grocer and the 
landlord, and look forward to next sal- 
ary day. 

A resolution was adopted at Thurs- 
day's meeting of the Fire Commission- 
ers, requesting the City Architect to 
prepare plans for a four-story building, 
to be erected at Mint avenue and 5th 
street, on a lot 75 feet square, donated 
to the department. 

The motorizing of the San Francisco 
Fire Department will, it is said, re- 
duce current expenses by one-third; it 
will also materially reduce the number 
of men to man the apparatus. From 
all accounts this seems to be the ex- 
perience wherever a department has 
only been partly motorized. 

Anyone knowing the present address 
of Percy "Kid" Williams, late of the 
Los Angeles Fire Department, will 
please communicate the same to Cap- 
tain A. W. Dominguez of that depart- 
ment. When last seen, some three 
weeks ago, he informed the writer 
that he expected a position in the 
sheriff's office. 

A Chicago policeman named Chris 
Dressel. said to be a model for honesty 
in the department, resigned Saturday, 
March 3, after completing 23 years' 
service. He declares that in the time 
he was a policeman he never took a 
drink nor a cigar from a saloon-keeper 
without paying for it. Chief of Police 
McWeeny, who worked with him for 



In reply to the request of a commit- 
tee from one of the improvement clubs 
for better fire protection, President 
Brandenstein of the Fire Commis- 
sion said: "There is no question 
about your need, and the chief will 
give you every possible temporary 
relief, but it is up to yourselves to get 
a site and an automobile chemical and 
hose wagon, by agitating the issue of 
more bonds, to the amount of about 
$1,000,000. All citizens should agitate 
more than they do for the installation 
of motor-driven apparatus. Go before 
the Board of Supervisors, get them to 
make an appropriation, and we can 
then give you the protection." 

Meeting of Pension Board. 

Mrs. Gabrielle Dougherty, through 
her attorney, applied for restoration 
of pension, in accordance with a deci- 
sion of the Superior Court. Referred 
to City Attorney for official notification 
and opinion. 

The same action was taken in the ap- 
plications of Mrs. Riley and Mrs. 
Stroude. 

The application of Albert Hendrick- 
son, for pension on account of disabil- 
ity, was granted. 

Firemen and Policemen Cross Bats. 

Last week we received the official 
baseball score card (a booklet of 17 
pages) of the FresnoFireandPolice De- 
partment's great ball game, fortheben- 
efit of the Pension Relief Fund, which 
took place at Recreation Park Thurs- 
day, February 22. After fourteen 
hotly contested innings, the "brav- 
est" defeated the "finest" by a score 
of 7 to 5. The booklet contains photos 
of both nines and officials of the fire 
and police departments, including 
Mayor Chester Rowell. We also ac- 
knowledge receiving a handsome 
dance program of the second annual 
grand ball, which took place in the 
evening under auspices of both depart- 
ments. 

Both events, under the joint man- 
agement of Asst. Fire Chief Baird, 
who acted for the fire laddies and Desk 
Sergt. Frank Truax, acting for the 
police, were financially and socially a 
grand success. 



Seattle Fire Marshal's Report. 

The following is a synopsis of the Fire Mar- 
shal's report to the City Council for the month 
of February, 1912: 
Value of buildings involved $692,865 00 

" " contents of same 171,120 00 

Total values involved 863,985 00 

Insurance on buildings 342,950 00 

" contents 100,650 00 

Total insurance involved 443,600 00 

Loss on buildings 9,004 00 

" " contents 18,991 25 

Total loss on buildings and their 

contents 27,995 25 



Alarms from street boxes 23 

" received by telephone 53 

" given at engine houses 3 

Totalnumberof alarmsof all kinds 79 

Number of actual fires 67 

" " needless alarms 6 

" " false alarms 6 

" " fires for which no alarm 

was given 

Fires caused by chimneys and flues 
Fires caused by heating and cook- 
ing appliances 

Fires caused by unknown causes, 

mostly carelessness 

Fires caused by matches 

" " " smoking in bed 

" " " gasoline and auto- 
mobiles 

" " " rubbish 

" " " incendiaries 

" " " ashes and sponta- 

neous ignition, ea. 2 

Fires originating in unoccupied 

buildings 2 

Fires originating in masonry, brick, 

stone or concrete buildings 6 

Fires originating in frame build- 
ings 35 

Fires extending to other buildings 2 

Harry W. Bringhurst, 
Fire Marshal 

Meritorious Act of Firemen. 



2 

23 



The humane act of James Leretto, John 
Shea and Ed Fox of engine 28, and Michael 
Stricklen of truck 2, who raised the Powell 
street car with jack screws, which had man- 
gled the leg of the little 6 year-old Lena de 
Mato Sunday morning, February 25, deserves 
more than mere passing mention. Stricklen, 
who lifted little Lena after the car had been 
raised, says the little tot put her arms around 
his neck and smiled at him. The child died 
Monday afternoon at the St. Francis hospital 
from the shock and loss of blood, where she 
had been sent by the United Railroads people. 

A recent dispatch from Porterville, dated 
March 2, says the use of the automobile fire 
apparatus was vindicated yesterday evening, 
when the fire department responded to a call. 
turned out the machines, made a run of more 
than half a mile, and had the chemical engine 
in action in one and one-half minutes from the 
tap of the first fire alarm. Only a few min- 
utes' work with the chemical was needed to 
extinguish the blaze. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



San Francisco Fire Commissioners. 

REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE COM- 
MITTEE. . 

SAN FRANCISCO, March 7, 1912. 

To the Honorable, the Board of Fire 
Commissioners: 

Gentlemen:— Your Administrative 
Cimmitt.ee respectfully submits the 
following report of matters that have 
come before it for. consideration since 
the last regular meeting of the board, 
together with its recommendations for 
action thereon by Your Honorable 
Board: 

Communication from the chief engi- 
neer, recommending that the follow- 
ing members be permanently appoint- 
ed, to take effect March 8, they having 
satisfactorily served their probation- 
ary terms: Frederick Brown, hoseman 
engine 28: John J. Rowan, hoseman 
engine 9; Win. P. Shaugnessy, truck- 
man truck 2; John J. Callaghan. stoker 
engine 41. Approved and so ordered. 

Communication from J. F. Riley, 
captain engine 5, requesting leave of 
absence for a period of thirty days. 
commencing March 4, on account of 
sickness. ( Iranh .1. 

Petition from citizens of Parkside 
District, requesting that a chemical 
engine be installed within the district 
bounded by Santiago street, Eigh- 
teenth avenue, Sloat boulevard and 
Thirty-seventh avenue. Referred to 
chief engineer for investigation and 
report. 

Communication from the City At- 
torney, submitting an rpinion in the 
matter of the full company or blanket 
form of salary demand presented to 
' the auditor for the salaries of I he com- 
panies of the department for the 
month of February, 1912. Filed. 

Communication from the auditor, 
notifying the board that lie will not 
approve the salary demands of I he 
different companiesof thisdepartmenl 
for the monl li of February in the form 

in which the sa were presented to 

him. Filed. 

Communication from Robert Harris, 
driver engine 37, requesting thai he 
be granted a leave of abi ence for one 
year, wit houl pay, from Ins regulai 
rank and poi il ion as driver in the de- 
partment, commencing March 1. 1912. 
< Iran ted. 

Communcailion from W. T. Welch, 



engineer engine 41, requesting that 
he be granted leave of absence on ac- 
count of illness, with permission to 
leave the city. Granted. 

Communication from the West End 
Improvement Club, asking for better 
fire-fighting facilities in their district. 
Referred to the chief engineer for in- 
vestigation and report. 

Communication from the Excelsior 
Homestead Progressive Association, 
asking for a chemical company in their 
district. Referred to the chief engi- 
neer for investigation and report. 

Communication from Battalion Chief 
Cook, in regard to Lieutenant Sheddy, 
fire boat No. 2, being unable to re- 
spond to Box 426, March 2, with his 
company, on account of passageway 
being blocked. Filed. 

Communication from Drill Master 
Captain Cullen, submitting list of 
names of members of different com- 
panies who have been satisfactorily 
passed upon at the school of instruc- 
tion. Ordered entered in Book of 
Rating. 

Communication from Drill Master 
Captain Cullen, submitting list of 
names of members who have been ex- 
cused for various reasons from taking 
active part in drills during the month 
of February. 

Secretary ordered to prepare a list, 
giving the ages, dates of appointment 
and nature of disability (whether in- 
curred in the discharge of duty or 
otherwise). 

Communication from H. R. Beckett, 
machinist, making application for the 
position of chief engineer of pumping 
station. Filed. 

II. n. Brandbnstein, 

President Board of Fife Commission- 
ers. 

Tikis. R. MURPHY, 
Chief Engii >-r. S. F. F. D. 
Administrative Committt e. 

Billy Nolan, relief o] erator and ma 
chinist, presented i he boys of 1 1 ucl< l 
with an Irish canary receni ly. Lieu- 
tenant liar! man is lead ing i ' ■ 
Dutch language, i he parrot know s 
"Ferris, "and wh< n he enters quarters 
after meal hours, he yells "put him 

out," in I tutch. 

Battalion Chief Murray mar!e this 

office a pleasant call this w eel 



Firemen Must Pay Poll Tax. 

The District Attorney of Contra Costa 
county says Volunteer firemen and all Span- 
ish War Veterans must pay the annual Slate 
poll tax of $2. The opinion, he states, is 
based upon the provision of the constitution 
of the State, Article 3, Section 12, which reads 
as follows: 

"The Legislature shall provide for the levy 
and collection of an annual poll taxof not less 
than two dollars on every male inhabitant of 
this State over 21 and under 60 years of 
except paupers, idiots, insane persons and In- 
dians not taxed. Said tax shall be paid into 
the State School Fund." 

The Contra Costa Gazette, commenting on 
the above, savs: 

"The Legislature at some pastdate enacted 
a provision which is found in Section 33S7 of 
the Political Code of the State, and which 
provides that all volunteer firemen thall Le 
exempted, but. inasmuch as this is in conflict 
with the provisions of the Constitution and is 
therefore illegal until the latter is amended 
by the people of the State, it is invalid. In 
many counties of the State the assessors have 
been collecting poll t n x fromeveryi ne except 
those, enumerated in the Constitution a; being 
exempted, and Assessor Meese stated Mon- 
day. February -fi, that with the District At- 
torney's opinion as his authority, he will pro- 
ceed to collect, from all firemen anil war vet- 
erans this year. 

Arcoroii'L' to City Al loll i \ ].< I V Mill! 

the judgment of a broker against one man of 
a fire company will no longer operate to hold 
up the entire salary list of that company un- 
til it is satisfied, as was formerly the case. 

Pat and Mike were working on the same 
scaffold when il fell, killing them both. Pal 
spirit ascended to the skies, Mike's didn't. 
Looking across the great dark chasm, Tat 
espied Mike and asked what lie was doing. 
"Shoveling brimstone," came the answer. 
"Work very hard?" inquired Pat. "No. we 
work a dozen shifts a day," was the reply. 
"Bui what are ye's doin', Pal?" asked Mike. 

"Sw ping i ho golden streets," replied Pat. 

"Work ver\ hard?" asked Mike." Begoriy 
yes," said Pat, "sixteen hours a day; men 
are verj s tarce hei 

Saiil I ho i her mislrei 

ban youi 
more." ".\e 
fully, "Oh, he ha hi ' I 

miss him i u lly . " ' * Yas, I U no v 

Low y,m IV. I \l i sn\ 

Hii Mi 

Tile oMi. if Gl 

i h<- purchase of a new ok 

'the trust, ea ol Si In u, > 
bond elect ion on two i 

00 for I ' " for 

park | 

Tin igh will shortly 

hold a i 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening. Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Reach Nurseries, take Castro street car to 23rd. or 

Mission. 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



EAGLESON & CO. 

1158 MARKET ST. 

PHONE MARKET 5417 

MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS 



AND SHIRTS 

Guaranteed Navy Flannel Firemen's 
Shirts 

alio 1 12 South Spring Street. Los Annelei 



Phone Market 4720 



Dr. A. Gertrude Frost 

CHIROPODIST 

Rooms 8-9 
1154 MARKET STREET San Francisco 



WM. F. EGAN 

M. R. C. V. S. 

..YETERIINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D 



1158 GOLDEN GATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 

M. L. M1LCOVICH. Prop. 

Martin's Restaurant and Grill 

1533 STEINER STREET 

Near Gearv San Franci.co 



THE 

PACIFICFIREMAN 

JOB DEPARTMENT 

IS NOW PREPARED TO PRINT 
LETTER HEADS 
BILL HEADS 
INVOICES 
STATEMENTS 
ENVELOPES 
BUSINESS CARDS 
WEDDING INVITATIONS 
DANCE PROGRAMS 
PERSONAL CARDS 
SHIPPING TAGS 
BILLS OF FARE, ETC 

479 TURK STREET 

Phone FRANKLIN 6867 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



Telephone Dounlas 287 1 Home C 4992 

WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRANT BROKERS 

630 KEARNY STREET 

COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1373 East 32nd Street. Oakland 



The telephone operators In New York City 
handle 180,000 calls every rush hour. They will 
connect you with any one of 500,000 subscribers 
In half a minute. 

Ask the exchange manager how he can handle 
all these calls, and he will tell you tersely, "By 
savli u the seconds." 

"Schedule time" is the keynote of American 
Industry, That tiumus Howard time. There's 
always somebody higher up holding a Howard 
Watch on the job— demanding tin- Howard type 
of accuracy and punctuality. 

The Howard Is the one watch in the world 
wholly adapted to mod. -in pn»m i-ss. It has 
the precise construction and thi sclentlfli ad- 
justment. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pa i for it. 

The price of each watch— from the 17-jewel 
(double roller) in a Crescenl Extra or .las. Boss 
Extra gold-filled case at $40, to the 23-jewei at 
JX50 and the Edward Howard "model at $350— 
is fixed al the factory and a printed ticket at- 

I :i ■ ! it ■ :. 

Find the Howard jeweler in your town and 
bilk to him. Not every jeweler can sell you a 
Howard. The jeweler Who can is a good man 
to know 

Admiral Slgsbee has written a little book, 
"The Log of the Howard Watch." giving the 
record of his own Howard in the U. S, Navy. 
You'll enjoy it. Drop us a post-card, Dept. N. 
and we'll semi you a copy 
HOWARD WATCH WORKS, Boston, Mass 



T. 1-1. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 

71 WALLER ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Home C 2458 



Lamanet Bros. 

Is the place of all places to get the 
very latest and best in the way of 

FIREMEN'S REGULATION SHIRTS 
FIREMEN'S TURNOUT SUITS 
GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS 
HATS & UNDERWEAR, ETC. 

524 BROADWAY STREET 

SA1V PRANCISCO 



SALVAR 

(I Will Save) 

The Greatest BLOOD REMEDY in the World 

— WILL CURE 

RHEUMATISM 

Acute or Chronic 



BLOOD POISON 

Acquired or Hereditary 

PARALYSIS 
CATARRH 

MALARIA 



Diseases of Liver, Kidneys and Bladder 



Diseases Peculiar to Women 



Phone Kearny 3523 Home C 1780 

JOE. H. ROSENBERG 

(Eiiiil anil fHilitary Sailor 

73 ELLIS ST .. Near Powell 
Loui* Frankenbeig, formerly with Ro*enblum & Abraham. Manager 



Home phon<- S 2il7 

The Little Emporium 

L. R1ZN1C Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 
2296-98 GEARY STREET 

Npar Broderick 
Telephone W«l 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 



$10.00 FOR 40 TO 60 DAYS' TREATMENT 

Call or Write for our 100 Page Booklet 

TO THE PUBLIC 

In offering Salvar to the public, we do so 
with perfect confidence, and state publicly cur 
willingness to have our remedy thoroughly tested 
in any fair and equitable manner, in the treat- 
ment of all diseases we claim it will relieve, and 
we will abide by a decision so given and dis- 
continue its sale at once if it is found different in 
any particular from what it is represented to be. 

SEITZ & MILLS, Agents 
1402 Market St., near 10th, San Francisco 







'ACIFI 




VOL. IX. -NO. 11. 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY. MARCH 16, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Views of Fire Chiefs on 
Motor Apparatus. 

[From the Annual Convention of the Paci9c Coast Asso- 
ciation of Fire Chiefs at Vancouver. B. C, Septem- 
ber. 1911.] 

Chief William Metz of Walla Walla. 
Wash., being called on, told of his ex- 
perience with an auto combination 
hose wagon of only 40 horse-power, 
which proved too weak in power for 
their muddy streets in winter. This 
was replaced by the makers at their 
own expense, with a similar one of 
double the power, and this latter is a 
success. It has even pulled a first size 
steam fire engine weighing five tons 
twenty-two to twenty-four miles an 
hour on dirt roads, and can be depend- 
ed upon to do this regularly. He ad- 
vocated limiting the speed to twenty- 
five miles an hour, with a correspond- 
ing increase in power. This he thought 
reasonable for all apparatus. He dis- 
cussed skidding, and considers two 
chains better than one. 

Chief Dawson of North Yakima has 
three auto machines, all with solid 
tires. Two of these can run thirty- 
five miles and one twenty-five miles 
an hour. The latter he thought fast 
enough. 

Chief Watson of New Westminster 
has a hilly town to run his apparatus 
in. He thinks the front wheels should 
have chains as well as the rear. 

Chief O'Rourke of Coeur d'Alene, 
Idaho, suggested stopping skidding by 
throwing out the clutch and throwing 
it in again at least this has been 
found a good plan by one of his lust 
drivers. They once skidded and broke 
a 14-inch telegraph pole and an iron 



rail by a front wheel skidding. Ma- 
chines should certainly have chains all 
around. He thinks skidding is always 
made worse by excessive overhanging. 
The weight should be well distributed 
over the wheel base. 

Chief Metz thought there could be 
no skidding if corners were taken slow- 
ly. Even five miles an hour is neces- 
sary for safety. In Walla Walla they 
need no chains for several months in 
the summer time; they had no skid- 
ding in a hundred runs. Chief Car- 
lisle of Vancouver thought there was 
everything in careful driving. There 
is much in the balance of the machine; 
there is more danger of skidding 
where there is too much weight on the 
hind wheels, and top-heavy machines 
would be more apt to skid, but light 
ladders in top frame would not have 
this effect, or has not, on his Van- 
couver machines. 

Chief Davis of Victoria told of a 
serious accident with his own car, 
caused by deflation of a pneumatic lire: 
the effect was to tear the whole back 
end out of his ear. He thought the 
best drivers are made from firemen. 
On one occasion he has broken a man 
in wit hin six weeks, 

Chief Meyrs of Spokane has five 
auto apparatus in his service; the 
auto 85-foot aerial truck has run up a 
twenty per-cent grade with eight or 
nine men on. Spokane I as very slip- 
pery streets. It is his practice to use 
chains on all four wheels. The chains 

cross dual tires alternate!] on each 

tire; they have made thiity-five miles 
an hour with auto ladder truck weigh- 
ing 26,000 pounds. The old driversof 
horses are the best auto drivers. 



Chief McAlevy of Tacoma wanted it 
known that he was entirely disinter- 
ested, but has five solid tire machines. 
He prefers no mechanics as drivers, 
and has been most successful with fire- 
men, especially those who formerly 
drove horses. He says chains on all 
four wheels when streets are wet. To 
prevent skidding he advises no change 
of gears, but keep the clutch in. He 
strongly favors solid tires. 

Chief Eley of Los Angeles has four 
auto machines of different types of 
gear and both pneumatic and solid 
tires. He has found that firemen 
make the best drivers. Pneumatic 
tires he considers very dangerous if 
the front tires should break. He uses 
chains on front tires of horse appar- 
atus. Thinks one must depend on the 
judgment of drivers, who must take 
corners at a reasonable speed. 

Chief Shrewsberry of Long Beach. 
Cal., thinks power must be reduced on 
corners; would never take out the 
clutch on corners. Hi- makes it a 
point to learn the working of every 
machine for himself and can run them 
all. Ilis i- reduce- i peed and 

then start up when nearly around cor- 
ners. The heavier the machine the 
slower it should ko. Always get the 
engine down under cool Mil before 
reachinj ci 1 1 er. On pavement;, lock- 
ing wheels is apl i" cause ski Ming. 

Machines should around corners 

fas ter tl an five to ten mill a per hour. 
Verj much depends on the judgment 
of drivi 

Assistant Chief Tl ompson of Van- 
couver bei ed thor- 
f with Chief Eley. Be thought 
thai .-ill depend on the di ivers. He 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



much preferred firemen drivers. He 
would hold drivers responsible for all 
accidents and make them pay for all 
breakages. He does not favor cutting 
down speed to twenty-five miles an 
hour, for the greater speed is safe in 
clear streets.at night. He had no ex- 
perience with pneumatic tires except 
on touring cars. Once a solid tire 
came off and landed away from the 
machine, but was replaced uninjured. 
Chief Eley has found that pneumatic 
tires do not sustain the loads, and must 
frequently be replaced in hard service 
at great expense. 

Expert Roberts of the Vancouver 
department said the secret of success 
was in always keeping the car under 
control. The clutch must never be 
thrown out when it skids. The driver 
should turn wheels in direction of skid, 
and must get clear sight ahead around 
corners. Never put the brake on 
solid when the machine skids. A front 
wheel can scarcely be controlled. He 
would suggest for it throwing the 
clutch into second gear and wheels in 
opposite direction from the skid. Two 
chains are advisable on diagonal front 
and rear wheels. A solid tire is the 
best, for one cannot hold wheel in case 
of a bursted pneumatic front tire. 
The fireman driver has been found to 
be the best, chiefly because the others 
object to discipline and the confined 
life. 

Being requested for his opinion on 
the subject, he said that to oil-driving 
chains he would advise boiling them in 
a bucket of tallow with graphite, and 
this should be done once in three 
months. Wash the chains in coal oil 
to clean them. Driving chains are 
sometimes broken by loose skid chains. 
They should not be too tight, but may 
drop one and one-half inches from a 
straight line on the lower side. 

Chief Metz said that Assistant Chief 
Lindsay of Spokane makes the best 
skid chains that can be found. Chief 
Almgren of San Diego agreed with 
those who had spoken; has a motor 
85-foot aerial, two 80 horse-power 
solid tire auto hose wagons and one 
with the pneumatic tires. The latter 
tires are very expensive to maintain, 
and he would not recommend them. 
One auto hose wagon tows a steam fire 
engine. Professional chauffeurs are 



not a success. Much better work is 
done by firemen, who are held respon- 
sible for all damage. He has had no 
accidents, excepting those on account 
of pneumatic tires. Experts, it is 
found, have to be continually tinker- 
ing, generally out of entire curiosity. 
Motor apparatus is very successful in 
San Diego, and they are about to have 
their engines drawn by them. Auto 
wagons will take an engine up a long 
hill in twelve minutes. To do the same 
work with horses requires thirty min- 
utes. 

Chief McKay of Kamloops being 
called upon, said that his auto appar- 
atus had not yet been received. Chief 
Foster of Astoria said that his city had 
just bought an auto machine with 
pneumatic tires, which he expected 
to outclass anything in solid tires. 
Chief Shrewsberry said that at last 
year's convention he had advocated 
pneumatic tires and then bought some. 
Since then two have blown out, while 
the old solid tires are still running. 
He is now for solid tires— dual tires 
behind when the machine is heavy. 
Mr. Phillips of Seattle spoke from the 
manufacturer's standpoint on drivers. 
He said that they were the most im- 
portant factors to builders. It is much 
easier to make drivers of firemen than 
firemen of chaffeurs. Mr. Plympton 
of Portland said that Chief Foster's 
new machine would have the cushion 
tire, which would be non-skidding and 
the best ever. 



Practicing the Golden Rule. 

In Boone, Iowa, Chief of Police Day 
recently inaugurated a "golden rule" 
policy that is panning out fine. If a 
man gets intoxicated, instead of haul- 
ing him to court and fining him, he is 
either taken home or cared for until 
sober and then sent home, without a 
scratch of a pen against him, except 
on the police private blotter. If he in- 



tends to be decent they give him every 
chance. He is given a fatherly talk- 
ing to, his manhood appealed to, and 
in a majority of cases the result is 
good. 

In cases of young girls a similar 
policy is pursued. If a girl is found 
on the wrong road she is brought in 
and talked to as she probably never 
was at home. She is taken to her 
mother, and although they do not tell 
the mother all they know, and to what 
extent she has sinned, they give her 
to understand that she ought to and 
must keep her eye on her. And it is 
working like a charm. Many girls 
who had not had the right training at 
home, and had started on the down- 
ward road, have been saved by the 
"golden rule" method. 

Chief Day says "he expected criti- 
cism, but not from the source it is com- 
ing from. The most severe criticism 
he has bump* up against came from 
the pulpit, aDes Moines preacher call- 
ing the plain "maudlin sentiment." 
But that doesn't jar Day from what 
he believes to be right, and he will go 
right on trying to make better men 
and women of the unfortunates who 
come into his hands. 

That preacher probably studied that 
portion of the scripture which says, 
"An eye for an eye," a tooth for a 
tooth." forgetting those words of The 
Blessed Master," "Neither do I. con- 
demn thee— go and sin no more." 

The recent Houston fire comes at 
an opportune time to show the im- 
portance of the people studying the 
methods recommended for wiping out 
such fire horrors. Fire-proof construc- 
tion by the use of burned clay, which 
is the only real fire-proof building ma- 
terial, was a leading feature of the 
Clay Products show held in Chicago, 
March 7 to 12. This was one of the 
real reasons the exposition was put on, 
and the public should take every ad- 
vantage of the opportunity to stop the 
frightful annual tire loss. 



American Rubber Mfg. Co. 



9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories— Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 



WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 



Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine paction Hose, Brass 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Departme7it Supplies 



V A C 1 V I C KIKEMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Florence Stone, whose engagement 
as the Alcazar's leading woman will 
be opened in "Cleopatra" next Mon- 
day evening, is one of America's most 
versatile actresses. With equal facil- 
ity she has interpreted heavy classic 
and light modern roles, and her Alca- 
zar season is likely to be marked by 
wide variety in the character of the 
offerings. It is the Fanny Davenport 
version of "Cleopatra" that Miss Stone 
uses, and her acting of the title part 
drew unstinted praise from competent 
critics throughout the United States 
while she was touring in the play with 
Melbourne McDowell. Of many tal- 
ented women who have tried to emu- 
late Miss Davenport's impressiveness 
as the Sorceress of the Nile, she is the 
only one who has succeeded in doing 
so. There are six acts of the Daven- 
port version of "Cleopatra," each of 
them necessitating stupendous scenic 
embellishment, and the costumery of 
the fifty or more people in the cast is 
early Roman and ancient Egyptian, 
combining artistry with gorgeousness. 

Empress Theater. 
Heading the new show at the Em- 
press Sunday, March 17, will be Joe 
Maxwell's Dancing Girls, with Julia 
Curtiss, a dainty, agile dancer, sur- 
sounded by a bevy of nimble-footed 
girls. Mae Devlin and Company will 
present "The Girl From Yonkers," a 
piece which offers Miss Devlin splen- 
did opportunity to display her talents. 
For a quarter of an hour there will be 
much merriment— the period that 
Charles Merritt and Winfield Douglas 
are on the stage. On their first tour 
of America come the Les Gourgets, in 
a novel musical act. Bennington 
Brothers, exponents of physical cult- 
ure, will display their prowess by feats 
of strength and endurance. Phil Ben- 
nett- he with the beautiful lyric tenor 
voice — will be heard in old time melo- 
dies made famous by Chas. T. Ellis 
and Pete Baker. Millie Doris, Eng- 
land's dainty eccentric comedienne, 
will be heard in a repertoire of songs 
from the other side. Richard O'Con- 
nor, a versatile singer and dancer, and 
the newest novelty in the motion pic- 
ture world, the Kineraacolor pictures; 
secured by the Empress management 
at a great expense, promise something 
in the way of a surprise, 



"AND WE HAVE ONLY MADE A START" 



SEAGRAVE Motor-driven Hook and Ladder Trucks, Hose Wagons, 
Chemical Engines and Combination Hose Wagons 
and Chemical Engines in service in the State of 
California 



SEAGRAVE Motor Apparatus as above, ordered for 
California Cities but not delivered 

All other makes of Motor -driven Hose Wagons, 
Engines and Combination Hose Wagons and 
Chemical Engines, in service in the State of Cali- 
fornia 

All other makes of Motor Fire Apparatus as above, 
ordered for California Cities but not delivered 



24 
11 



Chemical 



17 
5 



Auto Pumping Engines are not included in the above figures, 
i because the Seagrave Company does not build them, therefore are 
not competitors for that kind of business. 

According to the above figures, we have in service in this state 
more machines by 70% than all our competitors combined (and 
there are eight different makes in the 17) and we have more unfilled 
orders according to the above by 220% than all of our competitors 
combined. 

We publish the above for the benefit of prospective purchasers of 
Motor Fire Apparatus and for the reason that such a showing is 
the strongest possible argument for the superiority of Seagrave 
Motor Fire Apparatus. 

The most perfect salesmanship cannot make up for merit in such 
important equipment, therefore, it must be assumed that real in- 
trinsic merit alone is responsible for the great preponderance of 
Seagrave Motor Apparatus over all other makes in this territory. 

Not one of our competitors has more than one piece in any city 
except Long Beach, which was the first city in this state to place 
Motor Fire Apparatus in service. Long Beach has just ordered a 
piece of Seagrave Apparatus. On the other hand Seagrave Motor 
Apparatus has been repeatedly re-ordered by San Diego, Los 
Angeles, Oakland, Riverside and Pasadena. 

"The Proof of the Pudding is in the Eating Thereof" 



GORHAN FIRE APPARATUS CO. 



48 Fremont Street 



San Francisco, Cal. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 




PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 
BY 

JAS- K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks ami money orders should 

he made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 



Kditorial Rooms and Business Office, 47H Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 



Entered as second-class matter March 21, 190s, at the 
PoeifculTJCe at San Francisco. CaJ., under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1S79. 



SATirUDAV 



MARCH 16. 1912 



Chicago fire losses for the month of Febru- 
ary total $28,601,650, as compared with $16,- 
415,000 for the same month of 1911. 

The San Francisco Fire Department, out- 
side of New York City and Chicago, is the 
highest-paid department in the United States. 

The American -La-France motor propelled 
chemical engine, recently purchased hy this 
department, is housed at the quarters of en- 
gine 2. in Bush street. 

The eligible list of 510 candidates who re- I 
eently took the civil service examinations for 
firemen in the San Francisco Fire Depart- 
ment will be announced between April 1st 
and the 15th. 

A well-trained dog is a valuable asset to 
have around the premises. An exchange tells 
the story of how "Bum," a bulldog owned by 
F. F. Farrar, an employe of the Spokane 
Fire Department, saved Mrs. Farrar and t heir 
daughter from death Friday morning, March 
8. when their home was destroyed by fire. 
When the dog- smelled the smoke he ran into 
the rooms where the mother and daughter 
were sleeping and barked until they were 
awakened. The house burned rapidly and 
they were able to escape with some of their 
clothes only a few minutes before the fire en- 
veloped the room. 

Geo. M. Hardman, editor of the Sonoma 
Valley Expositor, is putting upa valiant fight 
against the dissolute madhouses and saloons 
which infest Sonoma, El Verano, Boyes' Hot 
Springs and other adjacent towns, where 
many firemen of this department, during the 
last four or five summers, have been spend- 
ing their vacations. The people of that beau- 
tiful valley, at the April election, will deter- 
mine whether those joints will have to pay 
high license or close their bars. We have no 
doubt as to the result, as the better class of 
people are supporting Hardman to a man in 
the vigorous fight which he is making. The 
PACIFIC Fireman congratulates the Exposi- 
tion in its efforts The editor of this paper 
was formerly one of the editors and publish- 
ers of the Expositor. 

The Presidio Fire. 



the fire boat David Seannell got stuck in the 
mud near Harbor View and was unable to 
render any assistance, but with the aid of 
the Dennis T. Sullivan and the government 
lug Slocum, was finally pulled off early Fri- 
day morning. 

Engine 23. in responding to the alarm, 
while being driven around a sharp turn in the 
reservation, struck a small embankment and 
turned over, almost causing another fire from 
the sparks of the engine. In the accident. 
Ed. Hewitt, the engineer, had his leg broken 
and had to be hauled out of the roadway by 
the members of his company to escape being 
burned by showers of sparks from his engine. 

Finally a chemical arrived, and with the 
aid of the fire-fighting apparatus of the 
troops the fire was extinguished. Loss $1000. 

The Two Platoon System. 

Under the caption of ' 'A Word to the Wise 
is Sufficient," a Seattle fireman, in the Feb- 
ruary Fireman, discussing the two platoon 
system, says: 

"There has been quite a little talk going on 
lately about the two platoon system. Several 
of the aspirants for office have been around 
to the engine houses telling the boys what 
they will do for them if elected. Now, as a 
matter of fact, it does not lay in the power of 
the several would-be office seekers to give us 
a two platoon system. All they can do is to 
recommend it, and if the council as a whole 
sees fit to grant it, then we get the two 
platoons. For how long? Just as long as 
they see fit. On ihe other hand, if you want 
the two platoon system, go about it the right 
way. Get a petition out and get signatures 
and take it to a vote of the people. Then if 
we get it, it will take a vote of the people to 
repeal it." 

Another fireman in the same issue says: 

"Don't swallow all the hot air about the 
double platoon system that you come in con- 
tact with, as you are well aware that we have 
had quite a lot of it in the past. Go about it 
in the right way, and then if you get it, it will 
be permanent. 



In responding to an alarm of fire which 
broke out in the Officers' Club during a regi- 
ment, il hop at the Presidio Thursday night. 



Around the Bay. 

The Steinway Terrace Improvement Club 
of Oakland discussed plans for the erection of 
a temporary firehouse at their last meeting. 
It was suggested that if the city would fur- 
nish sufficient fire hose, the club would form 
a volunteer fire company, build a firehouse 
and furnish a hose cart. This would do until 
such time as the city could build and equip a 
permanent building. 

The officials of Haywards have made ar- 
rangements with the San Lorenzo Water 
Company that in case of a fire thewatercom- 
pany shall be invited and they will immedi- 
ately start the pumps working. It was ow- 
ing to the lack of water pressure that the fire, 
that recently burned the Occidental hotel, 
gained such headway. 

Things are quiet in the way of fires at Rich- 
mond. A small fire occurred a few days ago 
in a newspaper stand. An oil stove became 
overheated and papers nearby caught fire. 



The lire was extinguished with the chemical 
before much damage was done. 

The new combination auto will arrive this 
month and will be installed in the new Point 
Richmond firehouse. This is badly needed in 
Point Richmond and will be a welcome addi- 
tion to the department. While Richmond has 
a fine volunteer fire company, and they are 
always on the job promptly after the sound- 
ing of the alarm, yet with the rapid growth 
of the city, and the large number of frame 
buildings, new fire apparatus is badly needed. 
The lack of hydrants also hinders the work of 
the men, and it will be up to the Council to 
take some action along this line m the near 
future. 

An Oakland paper says an ordinance calling 
for an expenditure of $15,000 for three en- 
gine houses in the Allendale. Ridgeway and 
Claremont districts of Oakland has been pro- 
posed. It is reported (hat the improvement 
clubs in the Allendale district will attack the 
proposed ordinance on the grounds that cer- 
tain promises as to the type of engine house 
to be erected have been ignored. 

Motorizing New York Fire Department. 

The Fireman's Herald of February 17. 
speaking of replacing horse-drawn vehicles 
with motor apparatus, says: 

"The motorization of th.e fire department 
is well under way. There are in the depart- 
ment 43 motor vehicles, including motor drievn 
steam pumping engine and 8 high pressure 
hose wagons. The other motor vehicles are 
touring tars for executive officers, runabouts 
for deputy chiefs, delivery trucks, etc. Prior 
to December 31, 1912. it is probable that 150 
pieces of motor apparatus will be in service. 
There are under contract, due for delivery 
during the first three months of 1912, 2 gaso- 
line propelled and pumping engines, 1 combi- 
nation hose wagon and engine, motor pro- 
pelled, 3 high pressure hose wagons, 4 auto- 
mobile hook and ladder trucks, 2 gas electric 
tractors for water towers and 2 three ton de- 
livery trucks. An Apparatus B<'ard to super- 
vise the motorization of the department was 
appointed in July, 1911. This hoard has drawn 
specifications for 31 automobile hose wagons. 
and has in hand the preparation of specifica- 
tions for 31 automobile hose wagons, and has 
in hand the preparation of specifications for 
automobile trucks and self-propelled pumping 
engines. 

"Thefiredepartment on December 31. 1911. 
numbered 4,420 uniformed officers and men 
and 560 civilian employes, and comprised 258 
companies. There were in service 795 piece? 
of apparatus, including engines, hose Vagons, 
hook and ladder trucks, fire boats, searchlight 
engines, water towers, fuel wagons, chief's 
wagons, etc. The department on that date 
occupied 250 separate buildings." 

Owing to the recent changes in the number 
of men on both fireboats. the crew of fireboat 
1 has dispensed with the services of their 
cook and commissary. A few of them are 
willing to pay the increase raise and get Prof. 
Mueller on the job again. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



San Francisco Fire Commissioners. 

REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE. 

SAN FRANCISCO, March 14, 1912. 
To the Honorable, the Board of Fire Com- 
missioners'. 

GENTLEMEN:- Your Administrative Com- 
mittee respectfully submits the following re- 
port of matters that have come before it for 
consideration since the last regular meeting 
of the board, together with its recommenda- 
tion for action thereon, as follows: 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
recommending that the attention of the Board 
of Police Commissioners lie directed to the 
utter disregard of the order issued to the 
police department relative to the stopping of 
traffic at the. crossings on Market street when 
the automatic fire signals are rung. Approved 
and so ordered. 

Communication from Frank Lottritz, truck- 
man truck 12, making application for salary 
during time off from February 7 to February 
23, on account of disability caused by swell- 
ing in right groin while on duty. Allowed on 
recommendation of battalion chief. 

Communication from John A. Miskel, hose- 
man relief engine 3, tendering hit resignation 
as'a member of the fire department, to take 
. effect March 1. 1912. Accepted. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
recommending that the following members 
be permanently appointed, to take effect as 
noted below, they having satisfactorily served 
their probationary periods: John Miskel, 
hoseman engine 6, February 19: Eugene Gill, 
hoseman engine 5, February 19; Jos. Allen, 
hoseman engine 9, February 19; A. O'Keefe, 
hoseman engine 1, February 19; J. F. Thomp- 
son, truckman truck 8, February 19; J. F. 
Callaghan, hoseman engine 29, February 15. 
Approved. 

Communication from the Pope Tract Im- 
provementCIub, petitioning foran p.uto driven 
combination chemical engine and hose cart to 
be installed in their district. Secretary di- 
rected to notify representative to be present 
at next regular meeting. 

Communication from Golden Gate Harbor 
No. 40, of the American Association of Mas- 
ters, Mates ami Pilots, seeking reinstatement 
of pilot on fire boat. Filed. 

Communication from West End Improve- 
ment Club, requesting the board to utilize the 
salary surplus at the end of the fiscal year to 
buy motor driven apparatus and to place a 
combination chemical engine in their district. 
Secretary directed to request representative 
to appear at the next regular meeting. 

Communication from Peter Hartung, 252 
Fast si ml. making application for position 
as fir. -man at pumping station. Filed. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
submitting complaint from Battalion Chief S. 
D. Russell against Lieutenant M. J. Mc- 
Laughlin refusing to obey his superior officer 
in the matter of testing hydrants on the 8th 
instant. Lieutenant McLaughlin to appear 
before the Commission Friday, the 15th, at 
r>:IT> p. m. 

Communication from I be members of en- 



gine 17, requesting the board to have the bell 
at the Tivoli Cafe on Eddy street connected 
up in order to enable the said members to 
catch the apparatus while responding to 
alarms of fire. Referred to Department of 
Electricity. 

Communication from George McDonald, 
driver engine 23, making application for two 
months' leave of absence, without pay, from 
Mf.reh 11, on account of illness. Granted. 

Communication from J. Angelovich, hose- 
man chemical 6, making application for salary 
during disability received while on duty on 
March 3, by falling and spraining ankle. 
Granted. 

Communication from Carpenter J. T. Burns, 
in regard to installing handball court at truck 
10, on Sacramento street, and estimating the 
cost of same at $750. Filtd. 

Communication from chief engineer, recom- 
mending that the following transfers be 
granted, to take effect from the 16t instant: 

Thom:is Stanton, from hoseman engine "J8 to hoseman 
engine 19. 

Thomas Sheehan, from hoseman engine 2 to hoseman 
engine 40. 

M. A. Foley, from hoseman engine 14 to hoseman engine 
19. 

L. H. Ryan, from hoseman engine 22 to driver engine 2. 

A. J. Morrison, from driver engine 2 to hoseman engine 
21. 

William Fields, from hoseman engine 14 to truckman 
truck 3. 

Thomas Finnegan. from hoseman engine chemical 7 to 
hoseman engine 37. 

O. B. Ney. from hoseman engine 6 to hoseman chem- 
ical 7. 

R. Harris, from driver engine 37 to hoseman relief en- 
gine :. 

Approved. 

Communication from chief engineer, reporting that 
Samuel Markowitz, probationary hoseman engine 29 has 
been assigned to engine 2 for duty as hoseman. Approved 

Communication from Alexander George, making appli- 
eation for leave of absence for one year from March 16. 
1912. Granted. 

Communication from the Civil Service Commission as to 
whether or not a vacancy exists in the position of Super- 
intendent of Engines, and stating that the matter is now 
in the hands of the City Attorney for his opinion. Filed. 

Recommending that Patrick O'Connel 1 , hostler, be re- 
stored to duty as such, and presenting the necessary leso- 
lution as follows: 

Wheheas. This hoard having rescinded its former ac- 
tion in granting Patrick O'Connell. a hostler at the de- 
parlment stables a leave of absence for five months and 
restored him to duty as such, and in order that a place 
may be provided for him without increasing the present 
fercc of hostlers, therefore be it 

Resolved. That Thomas J. White the last appointed 
hostler be. and he hereby is. dismissed from further serv- 
ice from and after the l.-th inst . and that Patrick O'Con- 
nell be assigned for duty as hostler on and after the 16th 
instant. Approved, 

Communication from J. HcCluskey, second Assistant 
Chief Engineer, making application foi leaveof absence 
from his regular rank and position as Battalion Chief in 
the department fora period "f one year without pay. 
conuni ncing on the L6th instant. Granted. 

' '■>( imi';il inn I'i r ,,, | |. ,,,, ,,,,., , | | llin];l: |; |\|,,, 

phy, making application fora leave ol al om 

regular rank and position of captain In this department 
tor a period of one year, without pay. commencing on the 
H'lth Instant. Granted. 

The necessary resolutions foi the above will be sob 
mitted i" i be Uiard. 

i ! and ■ I- cifli .M ioni foi ei glne 28 and battalion 
chief headquai tej approvi d, 

. || leclal mei I Ins I i idaj G 16 

The boy a of chemical 10 and truck lit have 
tr<>t tin- spring fever bad. Captain Powers 
;iii*l Driver Ryan are discussing ways and 
means of where and how i hey will spend 
■ " al Ion . Both declare for Adam Spi 
1 1 in the question is who will gel then first. 



Meeting of Veteran Firemen. 

The regular meeting of the above associa- 
tion took place Tuesday, March 5, with a full 
corps of officers in attendance, but owing to 
the inclemency of the weather the meeting 
was not as largely attended as usual. The 
Uniform Committee, also the Picnic Commit- 
tee reported progress. The routine business 
was rapidly gone through with, all outstand- 
ing bills ordered paid, and an adjournment 
taken at an early hour. 

Put Blinders on 'Em. 



The dispatches informed us the other day 
that a hotel in New York, occupied by 250 
actresses, caught fire, and the article was 
headed "A Gorgeous Spectacle." We can 
believe it, for it said the occupants rushed 
out into the street thinly clad, with their ap- 
parel on their arms. One fairy in Alice blue 
pajamas stood on a window-sil! and pretend- 
ed that she was going to jump, and a hun- 
dred firemen stretched up their arms to catch 
her. 

If she had jumped we'd bet a few fire- 
men would have been killed in the rush. 
The damage was small, the fire was soon put 
out, and the dispatch says the firemen "re- 
luctantly" went back to their stations. 

If the writer was chief of that department 
we'd have blinders put on those firemen for 
just such occasions. 

What Engineer Barricksof engine 40 knows 
about fooling chickens would fill a good-sized 
book. His latest device to make hens work 
overtime, a friend informed us, is that he 
recently got a fellow to paint a big red sign, 
"Eggs 20 Cents a Dozen," and hung it up in 
his hen house at Petalutna. And would you 
believe it or not, but those hens have been 
laving two and three eggs apiece every day 
since. 



Last week's Underwriters 1 Report is re- 
sponsible for the following: As a "cause" 
for a fire, or, at least, a tire alarm which was 
turned into headquarters of the Seattle Fire 
Department last week, something entirely 
new and ou1 of the ordinary was discovered. 
A woman resident of Ballard, the northern 
suburb, after racking her brain for some time 
in an effort to find a strictly sanitary manner 
in which to dispose of an eighl daj -old mouse 
that had wandered into a trap, sprung the 
idea that im ineration was the most approved 
modern method, and she immediately pro- 
ciM'ded to ill.' front window with a newspaper, 
a match ami the mouse. The result was a 
call for the fire apparatus. The records at 
headquarters are as follows: "Cause Wo- 
man cremating a mou e on the window-sill 
with a newspaper. Loss None; but the 
mouse wa ■■ fearJ ulh Beared 



The members oi fireboal l say they would 
no! be aur prised it' the building in which 1 1 ey 
are housed collapsed about their ears most 
any day. They claim the piles upon which 
the wharf is built arc eaten with toredo by 
the sail water. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 

Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering: plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening, Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Reach Nurseiues, take Castro street car to 23rd. or 

Mission, 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



EAGLESON & CO. 

1158 MARKET ST. 

PHONE MARKET 5417 

MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS 



AND SHIRTS 

Guaranteed Navy Flannel Firemen's 
Shirts 

also 1 12 South Spring Street, Lot Anaele* 



Phone Markel 4720 



Dr. A. Gertrude Frost 

CHIROPODIST 

Rooms 8-9 
1154 MARKET STREET San Francisco 



\A/M. F. EGAN 

M. R. C. V. S. 

..VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D. 



■155 OOI.DEN DATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cat. 



M. L. MILCOVICH. Prop. 

Martin's Restaurant and Grill 

1533 STEINER STREET 

Near Geary San Francisco 



Telephone Douglas 287 1 Home C 4992 

WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRANT BROKERS 

630 KEARNY STREET 

COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Asent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1373 East 32nd Street. Oakland 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 

JOB DEPARTMENT 

IS NOW PREPARED TO PRINT 

LETTER HEADS 

BILL HEADS 

INVOICES 

STATEMENTS 

ENVELOPES 

BUSINESS CARDS 

WEDDING INVITATIONS 

DANCE PROGRAMS 

PERSONAL CARDS 

SHIPPING TAGS 

BILLS OF FARE, ETC 

479 TURK STREET 
Phone FRANKLIN 6867 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



Phone Home C 2458 



Lamanet Bros. 

Is the place of all places to get the 
very latest and best in the way of 

FIREMEN'S REGULATION SHIRTS 
FIREMEN'S TURNOUT SUITS 
GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS 
HATS & UNDERWEAR, ETC. 

524 BROADWAY STREET 

SAIN FRANCISCO 



Phone Kearny 3523 Home C 1780 

JOE. H. ROSENBERG 

(Einil mtu iflilitarji ilaiUir 

73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 

Louis Frankenbera, formerly with Rraenblum & Abraham. Manager 



Home phone S 25 17 

The Little Emporium 

L. RIZNIC Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 
2296-98 OEARY STREET 

Near Broderuk 
I Telephone West 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 



The- telephone 1 pera tore In New York City 

handle 180, I calls every rush hour. They will 

■ ■(.hm-rt you with any oue of 500,000 subscribers 
in half a minute. 

Ask the exchange manager how he can handle 
all these call 8, and he will tell you tersely. "By 
saving the seconds." 

'Schedule time" Is the keynote of Ameiu an 
Industry. That means Howard time. There's 

always somebody higher up holding a Howard 
Watch on the Job— demanding the Howard type 
i.i' accuracy and punctuality. 

The Howard is the one watch in the world 
wholly adapted to modern progress. It has 
the precise construction and the scientific ad- 
justment. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 

pay for it. 

The pi Ice of each watch — from the 17-JewH 
(double roller) In a Crescent Extra or Jas. Boss 
Extra gold -filled case at *4h. t<i the 23 -Jewel at 
$150, and the Edward Howard model at I860— 
is fixed at the factory and a printed ticket at- 
tached. 

Find the Howard jeweler in your town and 
iiii, to him. Not even' Jeweler can sell you a 
Howard. The jeweler who can is a good man 
in know. 

Admiral Blgsbee has written a little book. 
"The Log of the Howard Watch." giving the 

Ml m| his own Howard in the V S. Navy. 

You'll enjoy it. Drop us a post-card, Dept. N, 

and we'll send you a copy. 

HOWARD WATCH WORKS, Boston. Mm* 

T. M. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 
71 WALLER ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 



SALVAR 

(I Will Save) 

The Greatest BLOOD REMEDY in the World 

WILL CURE 

RHEUMATISM 

Acute or Chronic 



BLOOD POISON 

Acquired or Hereditary 

PARALYSIS 
CATARRH 
MALARIA 



Diseases of Liver, Kidneys and Bladder 



Diseases Peculiar to Women 



$10.0(1 FOR 40 TO 60 DAYS' TREATMENT 

Call or Write far our 100 Page Booklet 

TO THE PUBL IC 

In offering Salvar to the public, we do so 
with perfect confidence, and state publicly our 
willingness to have our remedy thoroughly tested 
in any fair and equitable manner, in the treat- 
ment of all diseases we claim it will relieve, and 
we will abide by a decision so given and dis- 
continue its sale at once if it is found different in 
any particular from what it is represented to be. 

SEITZ & MILLS. Agents 
H02 Market St., near 10th, San Francisco 




VOL. IX. -NO. 12. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, MARCH 23, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



New York's Fight for the 
Two-Platoon. 



Our contemporary, the Fireman's 
Herald, in its issue of March 9 says 
both Chief Kenlon and Commissioner 
Johnson are unalterably opposed to 
the introduction of the two-platoon 
system in the New York fire depart- 
ment. A bill to effect the change is 
now pending in the state legislature 
and has the support of the rank and 
file of the department. In a general 
order which was read in all fire houses 
Johnson told the members of the de- 
partment that the agitation for the 
two-platoon system must cease or he 
would no longer try to secure the in- 
crease in pay which he has been seek- 
ing for the men. As a part of the 
general order the commissioner in- 
cluded the following report from Chief 
Kenlon: 

The introduction of a two-platoon 
system in the New York fire depart- 
ment would be disastrous in the ex- 
treme. The two-platoon system was 
tried out in 1904 in the third battalion, 
Borough of Manhattan. The system, 
which divided the service of firemen 
below the grade of assistant foreman 
into two shifts, went into effect at 3 
o'clock a. m., December 5, 1904, and 
covered a period of 81 days to Feb- 
ruary 25, 1905. During that period 
five engine companies and one hook 
and ladder company in the third bat- 
talion responded to 840 fires, but 
worked only at 333. The department 
reports show that the number of 
charges preferred against men in 
these six companies of the third bat- 



talion during the trial of the two- 
platoon system was 117. This number 
of charges was far in excess of any 
other like period in the history of the 
fire department. The number of fires 
at which the companies failed to do 
proper work in the third battalion dur- 
ing those 81 days was 7. The reports 
of time lost by the men, both through 
sickness not due to discharge of duty 
and to absence without leave during 
this try-out period, showed an alarm- 
ing increase of each. 

In engine company 13 the time lost 
by absence without leave was 7 hours 
46 minutes; the time lost by sickness 
not due to the discharge of duty, 467 
hours 50 minutes. In engine company 
20 the time lost by sickness not due to 
the discharge of duty, 640 hours; in 
engine company 33, 2,022 hours 35 
minutes; in engine company 55, 1,762 
hours 10 minutes; in hook and ladder 
company 9, 62 hours, and in hook and 
ladder company 20, 495 hours 30 min- 
utes. In the latter company the time 
lost hy absence without leave was 1,113 
hours 48 minutes. 

During this trial of the two-platoon 
system I was chief of the sixth bat- 
talion. The lack of interest by fire- 
men in the third battalion under the 
operation of the two-platoon system 
was brought forcibly to my notice. In 
this connection let me cite the follow- 
ing report made by me on December 
30, 1904. of a fire at 255 Greene street: 

"I noticed a decided lack of interest 
on the part of members of hook and 
ladder company 20. The men went 
about, the work in a dispirited, half- 
hearted way, evidently not. caring if 
the job lasted all night. They acted 



like men who had so many hours to 
work, and, of course, might as well 
put in their time there as any other 
place. As orders from me failed to 
bring them up to their old-time spirit, 
I sent them to quarters and brought 
hook and ladder company 3 (which 
was outside of the third battalion) up 
to take their place. A comparison of 
the work was decidedly in favor of 
hook and ladder company 3, for, 
whereas hook and ladder company 20 
had one officer and six men, hook and 
ladder company 3 had two officers and 
eight men." 

Among other chiefs who reported 
on their experience with the operation 
of the two-platoon system was Deputy 
Chief Charles W. Kruger. He stated: 

"I fail to find that the system has 
any merit, even should there be more 
men allotted to a company to overcome 
shortness. As the men are housed in 
for ten and fourteen hours, and par- 
ticularly on the day of changing of 
tours, this necessitates a continual 
stay of twenty-four hours, making 
them drowsy and slow in responding 
to alarms, while their work at tiros 
does not come up to the standard of 
the former system. The defects are 
shown plainly at fires, not in quarters. 
The two-platoon system is not a bene- 
fit to the city, to the department, or 
to the men themselves, ami I would 
recommend that the trial of the system 
be discontinued." 

In view of those and many other 
like reports, the then Chief of Depart- 
ment, Edward F. Croker, recommend- 
ed that the two-platoon system in the 
third battalion be •revoked, and that 
che former system is reinstated. In 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



his recommendation to this effect 
Chief Croker stated that the system 
was demoralizing and very dangerous 
to the discipline of the department 
and the best interests of the city. 

In my opinion, a two-platoon system 
would not improve the condition of the 
men, and it certainly would not im- 
prove the condition of the department. 
I heartily oppose the measure. 

Los Angeles Fire News. 

The fire commission received a re- 
quest last Monday from Capt. Ford of 
Battery A, N. G. C, asking that the 
old fire horses be lent to the battery, 
and promising that they would be 
well cared for. Chief Eley was di- 
rected to investigate and see what was 
intended. 

The fire alarm system installed by 
Banks Cregier in University district, 
will probably be taken into court. The 
claim, reduced by him to $4900, has 
been turned down by the fire commis- 
sion, and it was rejected by the finance 
committee of the council on the advice 
of the city attorney. Cregier says the 
city is making him pay for its own un- 
readiness and he will sue. 

The fire last Saturday night on 
Spring street, between Sixth and Sev- 
enth streets, did not damage the stock 
or store of Theodore Nielsen of 618 
South Spring street, the wall paper 
destroyed having belonged to other 
parties in another building. The fire 
did not reach Nielsen's place and was 
confined to other stores. 

Sixty firemen of six companies were 
routed out at 9 o'clock Monday night 
by an alarm turned in at Fourth and 
Los Angeles streets. They saw Phiiip 
Stern, a janitor, extinguishing a blaze 
in a mattress at 326 Boyd street, with 
a pail of water. One of the lodgers in 
the apartment house dropped a lighted 
match in bed, and other lodgers ran to 
turn in the alarm. Because the box 
which was pulled is in the downtown 
section so many companies responded. 

An overheated furnace on a platform 
of the new Times building at First and 
Broadway set fire to planks on the 
fourth story last Monday night and 
some one turned in a telephone alarm. 
The firemen were sent aloft to extin- 
guish the little blaze. The firemen 
won the plaudits of the crowd by run- 



ning over the naked steel beams high 
in the air, and no structural iron- 
worker ever made his way in a dan- 
gerous position with greater skill than 
was shown by the members of No. 3 
station, on Hill street. 



Medals for Portland Firemen. 

Members of the Portland, Ore., fire 
department who become distinguished 
for bravery or other commendable ser- 
vice are to be presented with medals 
by the executive board. City Attor- 
ney Grant has submitted an opinion 
to the fire committee that the cost of 
the medals could be paid out of the 
fire department fund, providing an 
ordinance to this effect was passed. 
The ordinance will be introduced at 
the next meeting of the council, it is 
said, and the awards of medals to all 
firemen who have shown valor during 
the last year will be made. 

No Smoking in Picture Shows. 

Fire Commissioner Joseph Johnson, 
New York City, has issued an order 
prohibiting smoking in any moving 
picture show in any part of the city, 
and warning proprietors of such 
places that violations of this order 
will be followed by their arrest and 
prosecution. The punishment of the 
misdemeanor is a fine not exceeding 
$500, or imprisonment for one year, or 
both. The order applies to audiences 
and employes. Although smoking has 
not been allowed in all moving picture 
places in the five boroughs, there are 
many of these amusement enterprises 
in which heretofore it has not been 
prohibited. The commissioner de- 
clares that there is great danger of 
fire and panic in moving picture places 
where smoking is permitted because 
of the turning off of lights during per- 
formances. 

Commissioner Johnsen has instruct- 
ed his inspectors to keep close watch 
on moving picture theatres. Violation 
of the commissioner's order may mean 
prosecution of both smoker and pro- 
prietor. 

Lodi, Cal., is considering the pur- 
chase of a Gamewell Fire Alarm sys- 
tem. Over $300 has been realized 
through an entertainment given by the 
fire department toward the purchase 
of the new system. 



Peculiar Series of Fires. 

A recent issue of the Insurance and 
Investment News says: 

For the fifth time in the past six 
weeks the attempt to burn Miss De 
Laney's millinery establishment in 
Visalia proved a failure as far as burn- 
ing it is concerned, although the 
damage done by the water amounted 
to as much as the fire would probably 
have. 

The blaze was discovered at 6:50 in 
the morning. The fire apparently 
started in the same places that the 
other fires have started, inside the 
drawers in the tables and cabinets. 
Miss DeLaney had just stepped out 
and had been gone but a few moments 
when the alarm was turned in. 

The first biaze was covered by $800 
insurance of which $650 was collected. 
The insurance held this time is only 
$500. 

The officers are watching and mak- 
ing a thorough investigation with a 
view of placing the blame where it 
belongs. 

The Underwriters' Report of this city 
says a contract was let on March 8th 
by the Seattle board of public works 
to the Gamewell Fire Alarm Telegraph 
Company for a complete new central 
office alarm equipment. The appara- 
tus is to cost $42,000. It has not yet 
been decided whether the alarm sys- 
tem will be installed in the present 
headquarters at 32 Avenue South and 
Main street, or a new building erected 
for it in Dilling Park, at Fourth ave- 
nue and Jefferson street. 



13th ANNUAL PICNIC » F ™ E 




Veteran Firemen's Association 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

at Fairfax Park, Marin Co., Cal. 
SUIN'DAY, A1AV B, 1912 

Boats leave Sausalito Ferry, foot of Market Street, every 
half hour from 8 a. m. to 6 p. m. 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Wilson Melrose will make his first 
appearance as the Alcazar's leading 
man next Monday evening in the title 
part of "Cameo Kirby, " the play 
which is best fitted to bring out his 
finest acting qualities, inasmuch as it 
served as a starring medium one sea- 
son in the east and enabled him to win 
distinction as an impressive interpre- 
ter of romantic-heroic character. In 
the cast with him are Florence Stone 
and the complete strength of the re- 
gular company, which insures all- 
around capability in impersonation. 
"Cameo Kirby" was written by Bootl. 
Tarkington and Harry Leon Wilson 
and depicts life in Louisiana seventy- 
five years ago. Florence Stone will 
be seen as Adele, a role which affords 
rich opportunities for effective emo- 
tional expression. Atmospheric stag- 
ing is promised, and between acts the 
local color will be sustained by melo- 
dious southern music. 

Empress Theater. 

A vaudeville bill above the average 
promises to break all records in at- 
tendance at the Empress this week. 
headed by Abe Attell, in a refined 
monologue of his personal experiences; 
Joe Maxwell's Dancing Girls, in a 
nifty and pretty musical novelty; and 
Miss Mae Devlin & Co., in the laugha- 
ble and well played comedy, "The 
Girl from Yonkers." A miniature 
musical comedy with seven people, 
will comprise the offering "La Petite 
Revue," will be the headline attrac- 
tion. A clever college farce, called 
"Books," will be an added feature. 
Val and Ernie Stanton in their offer- 
ing of "Who Stole the Shoes," serves 
as a "sole" stirring means for intro- 
ducing some clever songs and dances. 
Two artistic club swingers, the Altus 
Brothers, will furnish some rapid-fire 
club stuff. Under the non de guerre 
of "The Belle From Coontown," Coy 
de Trickey will entertain patrons with 
her inimitable coon shouting and 
ethopian characterizations. Vocaland 
instrumental music a plenty will be 
supplied by Kyde and Williams. The 
Three Lascelles, Damerall and Rut- 
land, and the famous Kinemaeolor 
pictures will complete the bill. 

If the commission form of govern- 
ment carries at the April election in 
San Mateo that city will have two new 
modern (ire stations. 



1' A C I !■' I C !■' 1 R E M A N ^_ 

FOR BETTER FIRE PROTECTION 

IN THE VILLAGE: 

A SEAGRAVE 2-WHEEL HAND-DRAWN CHEMICAL 




GORHAM FIRE APPARATUS CO. 



SEATTLE 
216 Jackson Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Street 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 S. Olive Street 



American Rubber Mfg. Co. 

9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories — Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 



WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OP 



Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hosr, Brass 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Department Supplies 



When You're Buyin' Oil 

buy a good oil— Panhard, for instance. You owe it 
-0 __, to your motor (and your purse) to jfe^ 

feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are marrieo 

to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

L. H. &. B. I. BILL 





Sole Distributors for the Pacific Const 



543 (inlden (late Axe., San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



pAcin(||fe^iREriAN 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor nnd Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PR EST! IN Business Manauer 



Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street. 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 



Entered as second-class matter March 21. 1908. at the 
Postottice at San Francisco, Cat. under the Act of Con- 
press of March ::. 1879. 

SATURDAY ...MARCH 23. 1912 



Death of Fireman Thos. J. Ahearn. 



Thos. J. Ahearn, a member of engine com- 
pany 35, lost his life fighting a fire in the hold 
of the Pacific Mail steamer Manchuria, Sun- 
day afternoon, March 17, by being overcome 
by smoke and afterwards drowned aboard the 
vessel. 

The fire, it is reported, started from spon- 
taneous combustion in the cargo of cotton 
shortly alter 1 o'clock, but it was not until it 
had spread to another hold that it assumed 
serious proportions. Immediately alarms 
were sounded and a number of engines and 
the two fire boats responded. As the blaze 
was confined to the hold it proved a stubborn 
fire to fight and it was not until 5 o'clock that 
the flames wert under control. In order to 
extinguish the blaze it was necessary to open 
a sea cock and let the water rush in. The 
ship took a heavy list to port when this was 
done and lines had to be run out from both 
sides of the vessel to save it from turning 
turtle. 

The funeral of the deceased fireman was 
held Wednesday morning, March 20, from St. 
Rose's Church, where a requiem high mass 
was celebrated at 9 o'clock. Members of the 
San Francisco Fire Department, representa- 
tives of the Loyal Order of Moose No. 20, and 
many lifelong friends of the deceased fireman 
attended the ceremonies. Interment was at 
Holy Cross Cemetery by funeral car from 
Thirteenth and West Mission streets. 

The sudden and tragic end of Ahearn came 
as a blow to his family, and an endeavor 
is now being made to collect funds for his 
widow and three children, which is meeting 
with great succei-s. 

Wednesday the fund for the benefit of the 
fireman's family had reached $3105. The 
latest contribution to the fund is a check for 
$2500 from R. P. Schwerin, vice-president 
and general manager of the Pacific Mail 
Steamship Company. Other contributions 
are: Mayor Rolph, $100; Raphael Weill, 
$200; the board of chiefs of the San Francisco 
Fire Department, $200; Ahearn's former 
companions in Company H of the League of 
the Cross Cadets, $100; an unknown friend, $5. 

Schwerin'a check was sent to Chief Murphy 
of the fire department The check was ac- 
companied by a letter expressing the regrets 
of the steamship company officials for the 
death of Ahearn. Because of the splendid 



work of the fire fighters in the hold of the 
Manchuria the directors of the steamship 
company have contributed $1000 to the 
Widows' and Orphans' Fund. 

Contributions to the fund now being raised 
for the widow and three children of Ahearn 
are being sent to Fire Chief Murphy at the 
headquarters of the fire department in the 
City Hall at Eighth and Market streets. 
Contributions are also being received at the 
various district engine companies. 

Chief Engineer Murphy, when seen by a 
representative of a local paper in regard to 
Ahearn's death, feelingly said: 

"His gameness cost him his life. I am con- 
vinced," said the chief "that he had worked 
until completely exhausted, rather than ask 
to be relieved, and that in his weakened con- 
dition he was an easy prey to the suffocating 
smoke. We found him face down in one cor- 
ner of the hatchway. Ahearn was familiar 
with the Manchuria, for he had been a steve- 
dore on the Pacific docks and had often helped 
load and unload the vessel, but the smoke 
must have confused him. He was possessed 
of an unusual type of courage. I have on 
several occasions had to warn him about re- 
maining too long in the way of certain death. 
He always said he didn't want to merit being 
called a quitter." 

Widows' and Orphans' Aid Association. 

The following is the official ballot of the 
Widows' and Orphans' Aid Association of the 
S;m Francisco ]'i r e Department on the adop- 
tion of Amendments 1 and 2. at the election 
which was held Feb. 22 to March 7, inclusive: 

AMENDMENT No. 1. -Strike out all of Sec- 
tion 3, Article II of the Constitution, which 
reads as follows: 

"On and after February 1. 1909, no member 
of the San Francisco Fire Department shall 
be eligible for membership to this Associa- 
tion, as provided by Section 1 of this Article, 
who has not regularly made application for 
such membership before the expiration of the 
first year of his permanent active service in 
said department." 

Amend Section 1, Article III, so as to read 
as follows: 

Section 1. The fees for admission to this 
Association shall be as follows: 

From the 21st to25lh birthday of applicant $5.00 

" 25th "' li.'th 7 50 

" 35th " 40th [0.00 

" 40th " 45th 15.00 

" 45th " 50th 26, S 

except for charter members, when it shall be 
$2.50. as provided in Section 2, of Article II, 
and such other fines and assessments and dues 
as the By-Laws may provide. 

Amendment No. 2. —Substitute the follow- 
ing for Section 3, of Article X: 

SECTION 3. Not less than five days prior 
to any election the Secretary shall mail to 
each member of the Association one of the 
regular ballots and a stamped envelope with 
the Secretary's name, address and the word 
"ballot" thereon, and upon receiving an en- 
velope so addressed, the Secretary shall de- 
posit the same in the ballot box. Following 



is the ballot: 



AMENDMENT No. 1 




YES 


X 238 


NO 


52 


AMENDMENT No. 2 




YES 


X 267 


NO 


23 







Around the Bay. 

Hayward expects to install a complete fire 
alarm system as soon as the bonds voted at 
the recent election are sold. There has been 
a little misunderstanding about the sale of 
these bonds, and had this not occurred the 
city would be ready to commence the pro- 
posed improvements immediately. Additional 
fire hose is to be purchased also. 

The volunteer fire company of Hayward 
takes a great deal of interest in the depart- 
ment. They bought and paid for the present 
apparatus, raising the money by giving dances 
and entertainments. The city supplied what- 
ever hose was necessary. The entire appa- 
ratus was recently turned over to the city. 
With the arrangements made with the water 
company to start their pumps when notified, 
there will always be a good pressure, and 
with the installation of the new fire alarm 
system and the new hydrants the city will be 
well protected. Chief M. Riggs is at the head 
of the department and has a very able assis- 
tant in Assistant Chief LaCunha. 

Commissioner of Public Health and Safety 
Fred Turner has been confined to his home as 
a result of straining the muscles of his back 
and nervous trouble. Commissioner Turner 
has not been well for some time. He took a 
trip to Oregon for his health some few months 
ago. It is hoped that he will soon be about 
his duties again. 

The extra men of the Oakland fire depart- 
ment are considering the advisability of em- 
ploying counsel to present their cases to the 
civil serviceboard. Themen in thedepartment 
fear that they will be forced to take the ex- 
aminations that are to be held to create an 
eligible list They claim that they were em- 
ployed before the charter went into effect, so 
under it they have some civil service standing. 
There are about one hundred extra men in 
the department at the present time who 
would come under this ruling. 

A press clipping from Los Angeles states: 
"A new use for old department horses has 
been found by Chief Eley, who has leased 
"Chubb" and "Aguinaldo" to a theatre 
manager for utilization in a fire house scene 
in a mnsical comedy. The horses respond to 
their cues without fail ard receive rounds of 
applause." 

Ed. King of truck 1 met with a very pain- 
ful accident Thursday morning while coming 
down the pole from the dormitory in response 
to an alarm by his bands slipping, throwing 
him heavily to the floor, breaking his leg be- 
tween the ankle and knee. Captain Ellen- 
berg called up Dr. Bodkin and after waiting 
some time finally called an ambulance and 
had him taken to an emergency hospital. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



San Francisco Fire Commissioners 

met in regular session Thursday, March 21, 
all members being present, and transacted 
considerable routine business, from which we 
take the following: 

Communication from Harry Sterling, car- 
riage painter at the corporation yard, re- 
questing salary for five days off duty in the 
month of February and eight Hays in the 
month of March, on account of disability re- 
ceived from lead poisoning alleged to have 
been contracted while on duty in the paint 
shop. Referred to superintendent of engines 
for recommendation. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
recommending the transfer of George W. 
Moesch, hoseman, from engine 4 to fire boat 
2 on the 16th instant. Granted. 

Communication from Superintendent of 
Horses Harris, reporting that a team from 
the department stablesdrawing forage to en- 
gine 15 ran away on the 15th instant and col- 
lided with Bryant street car No. 1,379, causing 
some minor damage to the car and injuring 
the horses quite severely. Filed. 

Communication from Battalion Chief S. D. 
Russell, reporting on the accident to engine 
23 on the 14th instant, while responding to a 
fire on the Presidio Reservation, and recom- 
mending that some action be taken with a 
view (o having the war department install 
electric lights along the side of the road 
where this accident occurred. Filed. 

Communication from Superintendent of 
Horses Harris, reporting on the number of 
horses available for service in the depart- 
ment, and recommending the purchase of ten 
additional. Taken under consideration. 

Application of John Cauley, hoseman re- 
lief 4. for three months' leave of absence 
from March 14. Denied. 

Communication from the civil service com- 
mission, in answer to our request that ex- 
aminations be held for pilots, marine engi- 
neers and marine stokers, stating that the 
commission is now considering said classes 
and will hoid examinations therefor as soon 
as possible. Filed. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
submitting reports from Battalion Chief 
Cook, Captain A. Engelke and Pilot John 
Ferem, relative to the accident to the fire 
boat David Scannell, which occurred on the 
15th instant in returning from alarm of fire 
from tliv Presidio Reservation when the ship 
was caught bv the ebb tide and set against 
Anita Rock. Laid over on calendar. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
Buhmitting complaint of Battalion Chief M. 
O'Brien against O. Vulenti, tillerman truck 
2, in not responding with his company to an 
alarm of fire on the 17th instant. Referred 
in board without recommendation. (Int. Mid 

tiled. 

Application of Narciso Perrone, truckman 
truck 2, for six months' leave of absence 
from April 1st, in order to enable him to 

visit his parents in Italy. Granted. 
Tlir following preamble and resolution was 

spread upon the minutes: 

Thomas J. Abeam, a member of tin- lire 



department, met his death through hisintripid 
devotion to duty. He was distinguished for 
the traits that are essential to the hazardous 
nature of his employment, fearlessness and 
unquestioning obedience. It is of the history 
of this department that once when stupidity 
ordered by a superior officer, who was clearly 
not in the exercise of a competent discretion, 
to take a certain position at a fire that meant 
the inevitable jeopardy of his life, he obeyed 
unhesitatingly and was severely injured. 
When asked later if he did not know that the 
order was to no purpose and could only be 
executed at the hazard of his life, he said 
that he thoroughly understood that ; then 
added, by way of explanation, "Butitwasthe 
order of my superiorior officer." This inci- 
dent illustrates the splendid principle and 
worth of the man. He was a perfect soldier, 
marked unmistakably for promotion to the 
highest honors had he lived. He made to 
this city and its people the greatest sacrifice 
of which a man is capable. He left a greiv- 
ing, inconsolable widow and children, to 
whom this Board offers its unbounded sym- 
pathy. Be it, therefore. 

Resolved, That this token, however inade- 
quate, of our recognition of the worth of 
Thomas J. Ahern be spread upon our minutes 
and a copy thereof, duly engrossed, be trans- 
mitted to his widow. 



New York's Two-Platoon System. 

The Fireman's Herald, in its issue of March 
9, commentingon the objections of Fire Com- 
missioner Johnson and Chief John Kenlon, 
editorially says: 

"The commissioner and the chief, and pro- 
bably every other ranking officer in the de- 
partment, are bitterly opposed to the two- 
shift plan, and every man of the rank and file 
is as enthusiastically in favor of it, which is 
the old, old story. 

"Tiie New York firemen made a bad mis- 
take by having the bill so drawn that it affects 
all cities of the first class in the state and 
therefore is not subject to the mayor's veto 
and thereby violates the principle of "home 
rule," which is, and should be, dear to the 
hearts of New Yorkers, Suspicion always 
attaches In laws that rffect New York City 
being pushed through the legislature without 
giving New York City's own officials a chance 
to pass upon them. That suspicion surrounds 
the present two-platoon bill and makes some 
p. ople hostile to it who might otherwise give 
it candid consideration, 

"On the other hand, it must be said that if 
I lie melhods of the New York firemen have 
not been wise in their support of the bill, 
neither is Commissioner Johnson wise in the 
methods by which he opposes it. To order 
men to discontinue their agitalii n in favorof 
Bomething which they want unaer puiu of not 
getting some 1 bine el e which 1 he J also want, 
is an act of aulhoiii v, of I'liuiM', but it isnol 
easily defensible. If is also a threat of pun- 
ishment, and ii is nut wise to threaten men 
hi' the calibre of New STork's fire-fighters. 

Members of lire departments possess an un- 
assailable right to agitate by all lawful means 



any change which they believe is in their in- 
terest. No fire commissioner can strip them 
of that right, even if he is convinced that 
what they seek is neither to their advantage 
nor to the interest of the city which employs 
them. 

"The report of Chief Kenlon recites the 
facts. The two-platoon system was tried In 
one battalion of the New York fire depart- 
ment for a period of 81 days. In the opinion 
of those best qualified to judge the experi- 
ment was a failure. Kenlon's report is a 
very serious indictment against the double- 
shift plan. 

"Unfortunately, however, it is not conclu- 
sive. One need not be an advocate of two 
platoons for firemen to say that a revolution- 
ary change cannot be satisfactorily tested in 
81 days, particularly when, as was admittedly 
the case in 1904, all the officers were strongly 
opposed to that change and, despite every in- 
tention to be fair minded, were certainly to 
be looking through smoked glasses. 

"It might be the very best thing for the 
police service if policemen had the same 
hours of duty as firemen now have. If such 
a change were introduced in a small part of 
New York's police system, would the change 
be forever damned because during a trial of 
81 days it was found that the 24 hour system 
did not work with oiled smoothness? We 
think not. A change that means a revolution 
in the lives of a large body of men takes 
time to bring into easy operation. It also 
takes good will on the part of superior 
officers. 

"We do not claim that the fire service 
would not be impaired by the introduction of 
the two-platoon system — such evidence as is 
available goes to prove that two-platoon is a 
synonym for disaster in fire departments. 
But in all truth we are compelled to say that 
no modern fire department has ever given 
the two-platoon system a fair trial of suffi- 
cient duration to make possible any conclu- 
sions of permanent value. Until such a trial 
is given to it, unprejudiced firemen must 
suspend judgment concerning the wisdom of 
two platoons." 

Veteran Firemen's Association Picnic. 

The Picnic Committee are actively engaged 
in making arrangements for the 13th annual 
picnic, which is to be held Sunday, May 5th, 
1912, at Fairfax Park, Marin county, Cal. 
The tickets are all stamped and have In en 
distributed to the members of the association 1 
and in all of the fire houses. Previous picnics 
have been eminent successes, bulb noisily 
and financially. The coming picnic bids fair 
to eclipse all previous ones. A further sup- 
ply of tickets wni be distributed at ihe next 

meeting, April 2nd TllE COMMITTEE. 

If we please others, why not you? 
O'Ct nnor, the Florist, 2750 Mission street. 
Phone Mission 5088. 

VassarCollcgcof I'ouchkccpsic, N Y..iun\ 
has Its OWn viihmtei I tire department, made 

up of young women students. The inv. 

ganizalinn aims rather at saving life than 

fighting Rami 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 

Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artiatic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening, Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Reach Nurseries, take Castro street car to 23rd. or 

Mission. 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th etreets. 



Phone Home J 2549 

EMIL SCHOENBEIN 



Fireman Cap Maker 

Formerly of 2 1st and Folsom 
...WILLIAMS. : BUILDING... 

THIRD STREET 

Cor. Mission. Room 307 SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Market 4720 

Dr. A. Gertrude Frost 

CHIROPODIST 



Rooms 8-9 

1154 MARKET STREET 



San Francisco 



\A/M. F. EGAN 

M. R. C. V. S. 

..VETERIMARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D.. 



"HI 



PACIFICFIREMAN 

JOB DEPARTMENT 

IS NOW PREPARED TO PRINT 

LETTER HEADS 

BILL HEADS 

INVOICES 

STATEMENTS 

ENVELOPES 

BUSINESS CARDS 

WEDDING INVITATIONS 

DANCE PROGRAMS 

PERSONAL CARDS 

SHIPPING TAGS 

BILLS OF FARE, ETC 

479 "TURK STREET 
Phone FRANKLIN 6867 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



The telephone operators In New York City 
L80.000 calls every rush hour. They will 
connect you with any oue of 500.000 subscribers 
In half a minute. 

Ask the exchange manager how he can handle 
all these calls, and lie will tell you tersely. "By 
saving t In- ■■-,., (h [ni> 

"Schedule time" is the keynote of American 
industry. That means Howard time. Tl .- 
always somebody higher up holding a Howard 
Watch on the Job — demanding the Howard type 
of accuracy and punctuality. 

The Howard is the one watch in the world 
wholly adapted to modern progress. It has 
the precise construction and the scientific ad- 
justment. 

A Howard AVatch is always worth what you 
pay for it. 

The price of each watch — from the 17-jewel 
(double roller) in a Crescent Extra or Jas. BoSfl 
Extra gold-filled case at $40. to the 23- jewel at 
$150. and the Edward Howard model at |36Q 
is fixed at the factory and a printed ticket at- 
tached. 

Find the Howard jeweler In your town and 
talk to him. Not every jeweler can pell you a 
Howard. The jeweler who can is a good man 
to know. 

Admiral Sigsbee has written a little book, 
"The Log of the Howard Watch," giving the 
record of his own Howard in the U. S. Navy. 
You'll enjoy it. Drop us a post-card. Dept. N. 
anil we'll send you a copy. 
HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston. Mas* 



T. H. K1LOO 

DIAMONDS AIND JEWELRY 

71 WALLER ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Home C 2458 



1155 GOLDEN GATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 

M. L. M1LCOVICH. Prop. 

Martin's Restaurant and Grill 

1533 STEINER STREET 

Near Gearv San Franciico 



Telephone Douglas 287 1 Home C 4992 

WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

W A RRAN T BROKE RS 

630 KEARNY STREET 

COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



Lamanet Bros. 

Is the place of all places to get the 
very latest and best in the way of 

FIREMEN'S REGULATION SHIRTS 
FIREMEN'S TURNOUT SUITS 
GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS 
HATS & UNDERWEAR, ETC. 

524 BROADWAY STREET 

SAIN FRANCISCO 



SALVAR 

(I Will Save) 

The Greatest BLOOD REMEDY in the World 

WILL CURE 

RHEUMATISM 

Acute or Chronic 



BLOOD POISON 



Acquired or Hereditary 



PARALYSIS 
CATARRH 
MALARIA 



Diseases of Liver, Kidneys and Bladder 






Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Afrent Northern California for the 



Phone Kearny 3523 



HomeC 1780 



JOE. H. ROSENBERG 

(Euiil aub iHilitanj Saikir 

73 ELLIS ST .. Near Powell 
Loutt Frankenberg, formerly with Rooenblum fie Abraham, Manager 



Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 



1373 East 32nd Street. Oakland 



Home phone S 2517 

The Little Emporium 

L. RIZNIC Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 
2296-98 GEARY STREET 

Near Biooenck 



Diseases Peculiar to Women 



$10.00 FOR 40 TO 60 DAYS' TREATMENT 

Call or Write for ovr 100 Page Booklet 



Telephone Weil 4824 



SAN FRANCISCO 



TO THE PUBLIC 

In offering Salvar to the public, we do so 
with perfect confidence, and state publicly our 
willingness to have out remedy thoroughly tested 
in any fair and equitable manner, in the treat- 
ment of all diseases we claim it will relieve, and 
we will abide by a decision so given and dis- 
continue its sale at once if it is found different in 
any particular from what it is represented to be. 

SEITZ & MILLS, Agents 
1402 Market St., near 10th, San Francisco 




VOL. IX. -NO. 13. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, MARCH 30, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Fire Drills in Factories. 



A writer on fire protection in an 
Eastern paper says that since Mew 
York's recent holocaust, there has 
been much agitation all over the coun- 
try on the subject of better protection 
to working people in factories and 
other industrial establishments. More 
and better fire escapes are demanded, 
better exits and a sufficiency of stair- 
ways. Another safeguard that is be- 
ing insisted upon is the inauguration 
of proper fire drills in all establish- 
ments employing large numbers of 
workers, ^hat proper fire drills are 
great helps in saving life has been too 
thoroughly demonstrated to need ad- 
ditional proof. 

In all properly conducted schools fire 
drills have been in vogue for many 
years, and many a panic has been 
averted and hundreds of pupils re- 
moved to safety from endangered 
schoolhouses by means of these drills. 
Fire drills are insisted on on all ships, 
whether in the merchant service or in 
the navy. It is argued that a similar 
system would be equally successful in 
factories. 

A fire drill to be effective, however, 
must be what its name implies, a re- 
gular drill, gone through with at fre- 
quent intervals, and carried out to the 
minutest detail. Every number of 
the factory force should be assigned a 
particular station and every section of 
the total body of work people must be 
assigned a point of assembly, as well 
as a regular means of exit. 

Frequent practice and the supervi- 
sion of cool and level-headed leaders 
for each sub-division will do more in 



the way of saving life in emergencies 
than any number of fire escapes. An 
inadequate or slovenly conducted fire 
drill would, however, be worse than 
useless, hence the expediency of the 
drills being prescribed by law and 
penalties provided for any failure to 
conduct them. 



Water Used Daily in Cities. 

A well known authority on the con- 
sumption of water says: 

The average quantity of water used 
daily in cities of the United States 
ranges from fifty to one hundred and 
fifty gallons per capita. The quantity 
used each day for drinking is esti- 
mated to be about half a gallon. It is 
of the greatest importance that this 
half-gallon shall be free from the 
germs of typhoid and other diseases. 
For many uses, such as sprinkling 
streets and flushing sewers, no purifi- 
cation is needed, but for a large num- 
ber of other uses the value of the 
water depends on the amount and 
kind of mineral matter it contains. 

The best water for use in laundries, 
steam boilers, textile works ar.d paper 
mills is that which is clear, is free 
from iron, and contains only a moder- 
ate amount of other mineral matter. 

The Petaluma Courier of March 24 
says John Hess, for the past several 
months an employe of Pet< r I.tieh- 
singer. at Little Pete's Tavern, for- 
merly the Rainville Saloon, lost his 
life in a fire thai entirely consumed 
the barn on that, place, together with 
two valuable work horses, wagons 
and farm implements and ten tons 
of hay. 



Remove the Possibilities ef Fire. 



No greater civic virtue could be con- 
ceived of than for every community, 
from the smallest hamlet to the largest 
city, to inaugurate at this time a gen- 
eral cleaning up, and thus remove one 
of the greatest causes of fire. While 
civic bodies are studying fire preven- 
tion in all its phases this particular 
course ought not to be ignored. The 
work of removing the possibilities of 
fire should begin with the architect, 
continue with the contractor, down 
through the interior arrangements of 
the building, and be completed only 
with an ideally trained janitor, who 
will understand that the least bit of 
rubbish may be the cause of starting 
a conflagration that may cost millions 
of dollars and many lives before it is 
brought under control. Janitors of 
public buildings, especially of school 
buildings, should be compelled to re- 
move everything of a combustible 
nature. The recent distraction of the 
Collingswood, N. Y., school building, 
at which time nearly two hundred 
pupils lost their lives, was the result of 
spontaneous combustion caused by an 
oily mop left in a closet by the janitor. 

The Milwaukee, Wis., fire depart- 
ment is amply prepared for any fire 
that might occur, according to a re- 
port issued by thai department. 
The various engines and fireboats can 
pump in one day mx tunes as much 
water as the department used in fight- 
ing all the fires thai occurred in the 
whole year of li)10. The total amount 
of water puriipi d dui ing i he j ear was 
1.7,475,650 gallons. Thetotal pumping 
capacity of all Cue < 
for twenty-four houn is 110,000 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Japanese Fire Departments. 

A Tokio (Japan) correspondent, 
writing to his paper in New York City 
recently, said: "The Tokio fire de- 
partment shows great improvement 
upon what it was during pre-Meiji 
period when the greatest solicitude of 
the members of the "hi-kishi-gumi" 
was devoted not to the work of extin- 
guishing the fire, but rather to that of 
preserving from cremation the little 
effigy of a god, or patron saint, which 
every company carried to a fire as a 
sort of mascot. Eye witnesses testify 
to the vociferous energy with which 
the Japanese firemen fulfilled this 
self-appointed duty, while the flames 
in turn neatly discharged their task of 
devouring everything inflammable 
within an accessible area. And, if in 
the end, the firemen escaped with 
their miniature wooden god intact 
they were pleased to the point of self- 
adulation, and actually believed that 
the public had no reason to expect 
more." 



A Blessing in Disguise. 

To accept a conflagration as a bless- 
ing in disguise, says one of our esteem- 
ed exchanges, is asking too much of 
any community that has been partially 
reduced to ashes. Fire is an ordeal 
through which no one is eager to pass, 
even though it were possible to discern 
through the flames and smoke a better 
condition beyond. Notwithstanding, 
seldom has a city been visted by fire 
that did not rise again in greater 
magnificence and commercial energy 
and from that time on leap ahead with 
swifter strides than had ever before 
characterized its history. 

Fire has been the making of many a 
city. The Chicago of to-day is far 
better off because of its disaster forty 
years ago, and the same may be said 
of Boston. San Francisco was trans- 
formed from a wooden city to one of 
stone, granite and steel. 



Telephone Douglas 1235 



THE TAILOR 



L. J. BORCK, 

MAKES A SPECIALTY OF 

FIREMEN'S '. ' UNIFORMS 

ALSO FINE CIVILIAN SUITS 
93 EDDY STREET San Francisco 



Burglar Alarm Warns of Fire. 

[San Mateo T'mes of March 23.] 

A slight blaze of unknown origin 
disturbed the household and guests at 
the home of C. W. Clark last Sunday 
at noon and brought out the local fire 
department. The fire was in the base- 
ment and when it reached a burglar 
alarm it set the bell ringing and for a 
while there was great excitement. 

Chief Bartlett and his men soon had 
the fire under control and the damage 
will not exceed a few hundred dollars. 

After it was all over Mr. Clark 
served lunch to the firemen and se- 
cured a list of their names with the 
remark that none of them would be 
losers by reason of their efforts to save 
his property. 

"That 60-year-old whiskey was the 
best I ever tasted, " said Chief Bartlett: 



13th ANNUAL PICNIC <Wthe 




Veteran Firemen's Association = 



OF SAN FRANCISCO 

at Fairfax Park, Marin Co., Cal. 
SUNDAY, MAY S, 1QI3 

Boats leave Sausalito Ferry, foot of Market Street, every 
half hour from 8 a. m. to 6 p. m. 



American Rubb er M fg. Co. 

9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories— Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 



WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 



Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose,, Brass 
Goods, Valres and All Fire Department Supplies 

When You're Buyin' Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

I_. H. &. B. I. BILL 





Sole Distributors for the Pacific Coast 



S43 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

A rollicking comedy is "The Blue 
Mouse," in which Florence Stone, Wil- 
son Melrose and the Alcazar players 
will be seen next Monday evening' and 
throughout the week. It moves with 
the speed of a runaway automobile, 
piling situation on situation and con- 
fusion on confusion, with not a mo- 
ment's let-up during the two-and-a- 
half hours consumed by its presenta- 
tion. So numerous are its mirth-pro- 
voking scenes that when the finish 
comes the audience can hardly remem- 
ber which of them compelled most 
laughter. Florence Stone will be seen 
in the title part, Wilson Melrose as 
Rollette, Burt Wesner as Lewellyn, 
Adele Belgarde as his wife, Beth Tay- 
lor as Mrs. Rollette, Louis Bennison 
as her father, Charles Ruggles in an 
excellent comedy juvenile role, Viola 
Leach as The Blue Mouse's stage 
mother and Will R. Walling as an 
auctioneer, with all the other Alca- 
zarans in minor parts. 

Empress Theater. 

Eva Ray, exponent of thumaturgy, 
comes headlined to the Empress next 
week supported by a bill of seven 
splendid acts. One of the prettiest 
tabloid musical comedies is "More 
Ways Than One," as played by Bea- 
trice McKenzie and Walter Shannon 
and Company. Carl Randall is one of 
the best juvenile entertainers on the 
American stage. He is a clever little 
comedian who has a sweet voice. 
Senator Francis Murphy, a comedian 
who is said to be one of the cleverest 
of his type in vaudeville, will be seen 
in original political speeches and 
stories. Walter Montague and Com- 
pany will present a strong emotional 
playlet, with bright comedy, and filled 
with spirited action, called "A Modern 
Socialist." Sheridan & Sloane have a 
singing, talking and dancing act, 
called "A Tag Day Episode." Moz- 
zetto, a foreign juggler, with the help 
of a comedy assistant, will entertain 
with a dexterous and skillful juggling 
act. Ethel Campbell, a clever singing 
comediene, and the popular Kinema- 
color pictures will complete the bill. 

In a Nevada town there is a nice 
little row between the paid and volun- 
teer members of a fire department. 



"AND WE HAVE ONLY MADE A START" 



SEAGRAVE Motor-driven Hook and Ladder Trucks, Hose Wagons, 
Chemical Engines and Combination Hose Wagons 
and Chemical Engines in service in the State of 
California 



SEAGRAVE Motor Apparatus as above, ordered for 
California Cities but not delivered 

All other makes of Motor - driven Hose Wagons, Chemical 
Engines and Combination Hose Wagons and 
Chemical Engines, in service in the State of Cali- 
fornia 



24 
11 

Chemical 

17 

5 



All other makes of Motor Fire Apparatus as above, 
ordered for California Cities but not delivered 



Auto Pumping Engines are not included in the above figures, 
because the Seagrave Company does not build them, therefore are 
not competitors for that kind of business. 

According to the above figures, we have in service in this state 
more machines by 70% than all our competitors combined (and 
there are eight different makes in the 17) and we have more unfilled 
orders according to the above by 220% than all of our competitors 
combined. 

We publish the above for the benefit of prospective purchasers of 
Motor Fire Apparatus and for the reason that such a showing is 
the strongest possible argument for the superiority of Seagrave 
Motor Fire Apparatus. 

The most perfect salesmanship cannot make up for merit in such 
important equipment, therefore, it must be assumed that real in- 
trinsic merit alone is responsible for the great preponderance of 
Seagrave Motor Apparatus over all other makes in this territory. 

Not one of our competitors has more. than one piece in any city 
except Long Beach, which was the first city in this State to place 
Motor Fire Apparatus in service. Long Beach has just ordered a 
piece of Seagrave Apparatus. On the other hand Seagrave Motor 
Apparatus has been repeatedly re-ordered by San Diego, Los 
Angeles, Oakland, Riverside and Pasadena. 

"The Proof of the Pudding is in the Eating Thereof" 



GORHAN FIRE APPARATUS CO. 



48 Fremont Street 



San Francisco, Cal. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 




PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom ail checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H.G.PRESTON Business Manager 



Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Telenhone Franklin 6867. 



Entered as second-class matter March 21. 1908, nt the 
Postoffice at San Francisco. Cal., under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 



SATURDAY 



MARCH 30. 1912 



A man giving the name of Howard and 
claiming to be a member of engine 21, N. Y. 
F. D. , also the son of a chief, is trying to 
nass checks among friends of the department 
here. They are not worth 30 cents. 

We erred in last week's issue in stating 
that Thos. J. Ahearn, the fireman who lost 
his life in the hold of the steamer Manchuria 
by being overcome by smoke and afterwards 
drowned aboard the vessel. It should have 
read that he was overcome by smoke, omitting 
that he was drowned aboard the vessel. 

The Alameda call men have been refused an 
increase in their salaries which range from 
$15 to $25 a month. At the present time a 
fine is imposed on the men who fail to respond 
to the call, and the men assert that the fine 
is excessive, and often amounts to more than 
they receive. The fire commissioners state 
that this increase should be asked for when 
the new budget is made up, as this year's 
budget was made up on the basis of the pres- 
ent salary. 

A correspondent writes us that we erred in 
stating in a previous issue that the San Fran- 
cisco Fire Department was the highest paid 
department outside of New York City and 
Chicago. He assures us lhat the men of the 
San Francisco Fire Department receive the 
highest-paid salaries of any city in the Uniled 
States. In looking into the matter more 
thoroughly, vve find, with the exception of 
the salaries which the chief engineers of New 
York City and Chicago receive, our corres- 
pondent is correct. 

We had the pleasure of shaking hands this 
week with the new Superintendent of En- 
gines, Samuel Berminghiim. The fire com- 
mission could not have made a better selection 
for the position, as the gentleman has hereto- 
fore had considerable experience in that line 
of work. "Sam," as ihe boys call him. is 
already quite a favorite with every employe 
in the vard. Mr. Bermingham is the son of 
the late Captain John Bermingham, U. S. 
Supervising Inspector of Hulls and Boilers, 
which position he ably filled for over30years. 

Should Able Firemen Apply for Pensions. 

According to a recent ruling of City Attor- 
ney Long, a fireman receiving pension for 
age, no matter how physically able he may 
be, cannot again become a member of the 



department. We understand the fire com- 
missioners may, at anv time they see fit, 
compel any member who has reached the age 
of 55 years be retired from service. 

In line with the above, an old veteran of 
the department had this to say: "I do not 
believe any man should leave the service on 
the question of years, providing, of course, 
he is physically qualified for duty. The public 
at large isimposed upon by firemen physically 
able receiving pensions. The pension fund, 
as I see it, was not started for able men, but 
for old and disabled men, their wives and 
children. The people are always willing to 
furnish pensions for such, since they recog- 
nize that the firemen's calling is a dangerous 
one, to say the least. There are over 100 
men in this department, I am safe in saying, 
who, under the above ruling, may, if they feel 
so disposed, go out of service. The pension 
fund was not started, as I said before, for 
able men. As for myself, I shall remain in the 
department as long as I'm physically able to 
I do my duty." 

Upkeep of Motor vs. Horse-Drawn 
' Apparatus. 

Assistant Chief Engineer Frank Millington 
i of the Alameda fire department, has compiled 
i an array of interesting figures on the pro- 
posed issuance of bonds that tend to show 
that the substitution of mechanically operated 
fire apparatus will work a financial saving to 
the city, as well as increasing the efficiency 
of the department. The difference in the cost 
of maintenance is made the chief feature in 
the argument compiled by Millington. 

The cost of maintaining a team of horses, 
according to the figures he adduces, is $32 a 
month for feed, bedding and shoeing alone. 
To this must be added the incidental expen- 
ditures of harness, harness repairs, curry 
combs, blankets, wear and tear on stalls, 
soaps, oils and medicine. The hauling away 
of stable manure costs the city $7.40 per 
month. Millington states that the necessary 
repairs, etc., enumerated above will increase 
the cost per team at least $10 a month. 

The life of a team of horses, as applied to 
I a team of efficient service in a fire depart- 
ment, is from six to eight years. There are 
at present six horses in the Alameda depart- 
ment that will have to be replaced within the 
| next two years at the outside. These horses 
will cost at least $200 apiece. 

According to the figures of the fire depart- 
ment, the Court street hose company was 
called out to one fire during the month of 
February. The cost, therefore, of the one 
trip, according to Millington's figures, re- 
gardless of the pay of the firemen, was 
something in the neighborhood of $50. Mill- 
ington points out that had the combination 
auto chemical and hose wagon been in use 
this figure would have been practically elimi- 
nated, as the trip to the fire would cost for 
oils and gasoline but five cents or less. 

The cost of operating the auto fire engine, 
taken over a period of six months, being from 
July 1 to December 31, 1911, was $2.54 per 
month. This included oil, and all battery and 



other current expenses, repairs, etc. During 
this period of time the engine, in addition to 
answering all reguler calls, went out 26 times 
for drill, pumping from a hydrant for 13 
hours at a total cost the city of $15.24. 

The cost of running the auto engine from 
the Webb avenue house to Paru street and 
Central avenue and return, taking an average 
of about fifty runs, is two cents. 

The proposal of the police and fire commis- 
sion is to do away entirely with the horses. 
More efficiency, it is declared, will result, not 
only from the fact that the apparatus will 
arrive earlier at the fire, but another man — 
the driver, will be immediately available for 
fire duty. Under existing circumstances the 
driver has to remain with the horses, and his 
use as a fireman, except at very large fires, 
is nil. Even at a large fire the driver's time 
is lost by reason of their having to unhitch 
the horses and lead them away from the 
scene of the conflagration. 

Forty-three thousand dollars was the ap- 
propriation for the fire department in Alameda 
last year. Millington states that the same 
appropriation will not only take care of the 
department with auto machines, but will pay 
the interest and redemption of the bonds, 
provide a more efficient department and re- 
, suit in the reduction of the rates of insurance. 

The proposition provides for the purchase 
of eight chassis to be used under the bodies 
of the present hose and chemical wagons and 
two Martin tractors, which will be used under 
the present hook and ladder truck and horse- 
drawn engine. The cost of these tractors is 
$3,000 and their adaption to the present ap- 
paratus would give machines that purchased 
in their entirety would cost $6,000 a piece. 
In this way none of the old apparatus is 
wasted, except the wheels, which can be dis- 
posed of to good advantage. 

As a further increase in efficiency 50-gallon 
I chemical tanks will be added to each hose 
wagon and those of the present chemical en- 
gines increased 35 to 50 gallons, giving 190 
gallons additional chemical to that now 
available. 

Fireboat 1's Quarters. 

As Captain Danahey told us Wednesday 
afternoon, when leaving the Harrison street 
wharf, you can say "Fireboat l's quarters is 
on wheels." If it isn't on wheels its pretty 
much the same thing, it's on rollers. The 
shack, for it cannot be called a building, was 
moved back some forty feet in order to per- 
mit the Harbor Board to replace the old 
toredo-eaten piles with concrete ones, when 
the building will be moved back, providing 
it doesn't collapse in the meantime. As 
the workmen were about ready to move it 
they ordered everybody out of the building, 
as they did not care to take any chances of 
killing anyone, being thoroughly convinced 
and none more so than the firemen themselves, 
that the hose tower and roof would give way. 
Finally, when the job was about finished, the 
firemen went around, slapping each other on 
the back, saying, "Didn't I tell you!" "Didn't 
I tell you!" 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



San Francisco Fire Commissioners 

met in regular session Friday, March 29, 
all members being present, and transacted 
considerable routine business, from which we 
take the following: 

Communication from William G. Scheper, 
hoseman engine 17, making application for 
leave of absence for six months from March 
25, oh account of sickness. Recommended 
th?.t he-be sent for as the application is not 
properly endorsed. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
recommending that the position of Carles B. 
Rogers be changed from hoseman to driver of 
engine 37, to take effect March 22. Approved. 

Communication from City Attorney Long 
in answer to our request to be advised whether 
or not we can legally compensate a pensioner 
of the department for special services as an 
expert on motor-driven apparatus. It is the 
opinion of the city attorney that although the 
charter does not specifically prohibit such em- 
ployment, it was not intended to authorize it. 
The administrative committee reports to the 
board that according to the city attorney it 
would not be illegal to compensate a pensioner 
for the purpose contemplated, it being work 
of a special nature. However, in view of the 
general purport of the decision, as far as it 
can be ascertained from the language used, 
the administrative committee is of the opinion 
that no compensation should be paid to Mr. 
Gorter. At the same time, the administra- 
tive committee takes occasioii to observe that 
Mr. Gorter was not retired for disability, and 
even had he been retired- for disability, that 
in nowise would affect his mental competency 
for rendering the service Bequired of him, 
which involved simply the use of his brain. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
submitting report of Battalion Chief Michael 
Bodpn relative to a fight between substitute 
James McCarthy and Hoseman L. Heriot, 
both of engine 35, which occurred at company 
quarters on the 24th instant. Referred to 
chief with full power. 

Communication from the civil service com- 
mission, stating there are no available eligi- 
bles for the positions named and authorizing 
us tojijKnaUij' ^tprnporarVgiuppointments for a 
period urn exceeding thirty days from April 

1, as follows: .Three pilots for fire boats, 

I Mill i . .:■ . , 

seven marine engineers, seven marine stokers, 

one .suuer.in Undent of horses,, two draymen, 

two hirrnesVrital.ers. three carriage painters, 
four blacksmiths, lour blaclcamiltlA' helpers. 
one black.-milh finisher, one fiteamfitter, two 
boilermakers, one foreman woodworker, one 
woodworker/one patternmaker, four horse- 
shoers, -1'nriy live firemen Referred to com- 
mission wi| In nit rec mem la I mn. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
submitting complain I against Win Scheper, 
ho' .e'inail engine IV,' lor violation of the rules. 

Itecnrrlnieiul.'d ihot the chief lie directed t" 

pi'i-LW.-chlU'gles. 

1 ''/niitkU/'i' ihon from chief engineer, re- 

''oiiiMWmJinjg [that chemical company 12 be 
discontinued on or about April 16 ami a new 

engine company eslahli-hed to be known as 

erigirifiifb'frfpMty 45; to ta'Ke the place of said 



chemical company. 

Communication from chief engineer, re- 
porting that engine company 44 will go into 
service on April 1st, at 8 a. m. and giving the 
complement of men as follows: Edw. Skelly, 
captain; P. Gallagher, lieutenant; Jos. Nan- 
nery, driver; Jos. Paris, stoker; H. Griffith, 
Geo. Spellman, Wm. F. Meyers, A Jensen 
and M. Dwyer, hosemen. Placed on file. 

Communication from ohief engineer, re- 
commending the following transfers be made, 
to take effect April 1: Jos. Nannery, from 
driver chemical 1 to driver engine 44; H. F. 
Griffith, from hoseman engine 39 to hoseman 
engine 44; Geo. Spellman, from hoseman en- 
gine 24 to hoseman engine44; Wm. F. Meyers, 
from hoseman engine 10 to hoseman engine 
44; A. Jensen, from hoseman engine 10 to 
hoseman engine 44; Michael Dwyer, from 
hoseman engine 12 to hoseman engine 44. 
Recommended for approval. 

Communication from the superintendent of 
engines in response to order of the board that 
he report on the alleged disability of Harry 
Sterling, carriage painter at the corporation 
yard, recommending that said Harry Sterling 
be allowed pay for the number of days he was 
off duty. Recommended for approval. 

A rule was adopted requiring the depart- 
ment physician and surgeon for an hour and 
a-half daily to be in the office of the fire oe- 
partment headquarters. 

D. R. Conniff tendered his resignation as 
secretary to the board. It was accepted with 
a vote of thanks for efficient services and he 
was restored to his old position in the office, 

Frank Kennedy was appointed secretary. 

Charges were ordered filed against Wm. 
Matheson for failing to respond with his com- 
pany on March 28. A special meeting is to 
be held Monday evening at 7:45, to try Ma- 
theson on the above charge. 

Wm. Laughran of engine 6 sustained a se- 
vere sprain of the left angle while working 
at the Hawley Co. building fire at 650 Seventh 
street at midnight Thursday by stepping upon 
a loose board, throwing him to the ground. 
Dun Riordan of engine 20, also sustained a 
fracture of the right leg, as a result of a fall 
while sliding down the pole in quarters when 
in the act of responding to the above fire. 

If we please others, why not ycu? 
O'Connor, the Florist, 2756 Mission street. 
Phone Mission 5088. 

Metalpolishers to Cross Bats with the 
Panamanians. 

The firemen's Meialpoliah base ball team, 
after an extended layoff during the winter 

months, have organi'/i il for the coming season 
and will play t heir opening game when the\ 
cross bats with the fust Panamanian lean 
from the Mission, on Sunday, April 7lh, Hi 
Lohos Square Park, fool of Webster street, 
at 2 p. in. 

The Metalpolish team is under the manage- 
ment of Dave Capelli of engine company 20. 
The team is ci m| nsi il mot 1 1\ of tin men, ami 
to make the game interesting it was agreed 
to bj both managers to pl:i\ for a French 
dinner, to take place m the evening. A num- 



ber of friends of both teams have signified 
their willingness to attend the game and also 
the dinner, and one jolly good time is assured 
the players, as their wives and sweethearts 
are invited to take part in the evening's 
festivities. 

Music will be furnished for the occasion by 
Earl Schmidt, and he stands in a class by 
himself in that line. 

The lineup of the game is as follows: 

PANAMANIANS METALPOLISH 

Ed. Carey Pitcher W. Scott 

Ed. Johnson Catcher '. P. Moholy 

Doc. Walsh First Base Ed. Shea 

Oscar Siemon... Second Base Bunt Gavin 

John Atthowe. ...Third Base S. Comber 

W. Atthowe Short Stop ,H. Ingerman 

Tom Benn Left Field H. Duffield 

Pete Smith Center Field R. Burns 

C. Landresse Right Field J. Gavin 

SUBS SUBS 

Wm. McManus Chas. Brennan 

A. Robertson Bill Parry 

Capt. A. Davis Chris Lutz 

Auditor Tom Boyle has agreed to officiate 
as umpire. 

Firemen Defeat the Presidio Nine. 

In a well contested game of base bail be- 
tween a nine composed of firemen from truck 
4 and engine S and a nine composed of soldier 
boys from the Presidio, which took place at 
the Fort Mason ball grounds last Sunday, the 
firemen defeated Uncle Sam's boys by a score 
of 16 to 4. 

The batteries were Collett and Brennan for 
the fire laddies and Miller and Schneider for 
the soldier boys. 

The lineup of the firemen's nine was as 
follows: O'Neill, second base; Bowler, third 
base; Lindeberg, first base; Monty, short 
stop; Lutz, left field; Brennan, catcher; Col- 
lett, pitcher; Church, center field; Parry, 
right field. 

Los Angeles Fire News. 

The fire commission Monday, although as- 
sured that only $750,000 could be expected, 
approved a budget for the ensuing year that 
calls for $945,138. It includes a request for 
nine new engine houses, mostly for the out- 
lying districts, to be equipped in part with six 
auto pumping engines and three service 
trucks. The pumping engines will cost 

$60, and the service trucks $25,000. The 

commission approved the budget, too, of the 
tire alarm and telegraph service for $181,118. 
Tins includes the first payment proposed on 
t he new lire alarm system 

The appointment by Chief Eley of the fol- 
lowing to he tin nun was approved: Gay lord 
I. Watson, George A. II. Schwoerer, -li . 
Raj mond .1 I'.. Grandon, 1. I i The 

board will ask the park commission to sup 
ply flowers for decorating the fire departn 
equipment in the Shriners 1 The 

chief was ordered to have the board of pub- 
lic works hereafter furnish pumps to clear 

cellars of water after (ires. 



.las. II. Rogers and S. II Simons were visi- 
tors to our sanctum Wedm sday. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening, Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 155J 

To Reach Nurseries, take Castro street car to 23rd. or 

Mission. 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



Phone Home J 2549 

BMIL SCHOB N BB1N 

Fireman Cap Maker 

Formerly of 21st and Folsom 
...WILLIAMS.-. BUILDING... 

THIRD STREET 

Cor. Mission. Room 307 SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Market 4720 

Dr. A. Gertrude Frost 

CHIROPODIST 

Rooms 8-9 

1154 MARKET STREET San Francisco 



\A/M. F. EGAN 

M. R. C. V. S. 

..VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D 



1155 OOLDEN GATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 

M. L. MILCOVICH. Prop. 

Martin's Restaurant and Grill 

1533 STE1NER STREET 

Near Geary San Franci*co 



THE 

PACIFICFIREMAN 

JOB DEPARTMENT 

IS NOW PREPARED TO PRINT 

LETTER HEADS 

BILL HEADS 

INVOICES 

STATEMENTS 

ENVELOPES 

BUSINESS CARDS 

WEDDING INVITATIONS 

DANCE PROGRAMS 

PERSONAL CARDS 

SHIPPING TAGS 

BILLS OF FARE, ETC 

479 "TURK STREET 
Phone FRANKLIN 6867 



Telephone Douglai 287 I 



Home C 4992 



WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 



WARRANT BROKERS 



630 KEARNY STREET 

COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1373 East 32nd Street. Oakland 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 

The telephone operators In New York City 
handle 180.000 calls every rush hour. They will 
connect you with any oue of 500.000 subscribers 
In hall a minute. 

Ask the exchange manager how he can handle 
all these calls, and he will tell you tersely, "By 
saving the seconds." 

"Schedule time" is the keynote of American 
Industry. That means Howard time. There's 
always somebody higher up holding a Howard 
Will. Ii on the job— demanding the Howard type 
,if accuracy and punctuality. 

The Howard is the one watch in the world 
wholly adapted to modern progress. It has 
the precise construction and the scientific ad- 
just ment. , , . 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 

tin- price "f each watch— from the 17-jewel 
(double roller) In a Crescent Extra or Jas. Boss 
Extra gold-tilled case at $40, to the 23-jewel at 
(ISO and the Edward Howard model at J3o0— 
Is fixed at the factory and a printed ticket at- 
tached. , 

Find the Howard jeweler In your town and 
talk to him. Not every jeweler can sell you a 
Howard. The jeweler who can Is a good man 
to know. ,, ., . . 

Vliniral Sigsbee has written a little book. 
"The Log of the Howard Watch." giving the 
record of his own Howard in the U. S. Navy. 
fou'll enjoy It. Drop us a post-card. Dept. N. 
and we'll send you a copy. 
HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston. Mass 



T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 

71 WALLER ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Home C 2458 



Lamanet Bros. 

Is the place of all places to get the 
very latest and best in the way of 

FIREMEN'S REGULATION SHIRTS 
FIREMEN'S TURNOUT SUITS 
QENTS' FURNISHING GOODS 
HATS & UNDERWEAR, ETC. 

524 BROADWAY STREET 

SAIN PRAINCISCO 



SALVAR 

(I Will Save) 

The Greatest BLOOD REMEDY in the World 

WILL CURE 

RHEUMATISM 

Acute or Chronic 



BLOOD POISON 



Acquired or Hereditary 



PARALYSIS 
CATARRH 
MALARIA 



Diseases of Liver, Kidneys and Bladder 



Diseases Peculiar to Women 



Phone Kearny 3523 Home C 1780 

JOE. H. ROSENBERG 

(Html ani> fHilttaru Sailor 

73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 

Louis Frankenberg, formerly with Ro*enblum& Abraham. Manager 



$10.00 FOR 40 TO 60 DAYS' TREATMENT 

Coil or Write for our 100 Page Booklet 



Home phone S 2517 

The Little Emporium 

L. RIZNIC Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 

2296-98 GEARY STREET 

Near Broderi<k 
Telephone We.1 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 



TO THE PUBLIC 

In offering Salvar to the public, we do so 
with perfect confidence, and slate publicly our 
willingness to have our remedy thoroughly tested 
in any (air and equitable manner, in the treat- 
ment of all diseases we claim it will relieve, and 
we will abide by a decision so given and dis- 
continue its sale at once if it is found different in 
any particular from what it is represented to be. 

SEITZ & MILLS, Agents 

1402 Market St., near 10th, San Francisco 




VOL. IX. -NO. 14. 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Fireman Killed by Motor 
Hose Wagon. 

A correspondent sends us a copy of 
the Bermingham(Ala.) Age-Herald of 
March 22 containing the death of Capt. 
H. A. Smith, one of the most popular 
men of the Bermingham Fire Depart- 
ment, who met his death while mak- 
ing a run to a fire, from which we 
quote: 

While attempting to board a moving 
auto fire hose wagon last night about 
9 o'clock at Twelfth avenue and St. 
Charles street, Capt. Howard A. Smith 
of fire station No. 3 was run over and 
died of his injuries a few hours later 
at the South Highlands infirmary at 
11:27 o'clock. 

A fire alarm was received at 9 o'clock 
from 1312 St. Charles street and the 
equipment at station No. 3 at Five 
Points answered the alarm. They 
reached Twelfth avenue and St. 
Charles street, where a crowd was 
congregated. Captain Smith jumped 
from the hose wagon, thinking the lire 
was at that point. He was informed 
by a man in the crowd that it was 
several doors up the street. 

Captain Smiih then gave Fireman 
Stanfield, who was driving, orders to 
go ahead, and as the machine started 
he caught at it as it passed him. He 
stepped directly in front of the left 
side of the machine and attempted to 
place his foot on the step from the 
front. His foot missed the step and he 
slipped, falling to the ground. lie was 
pushed backward bj the machine, and 
it passed over the right side of his 
body from the feet up. His right leg 



was broken, his chest and heart crush- 
ed and the base of his skull fractured. 
He was taken to the South Highlands 
infirmary nearby in an automobile 
which was standing near. He died at 
the infirmary about two hours later. 

Captain Smith was 26 years of age 
and was married. He came here sev- 
eral years ago from Hartseile, where 
his parents now reside. He began in 
the fire department, as do all others, 
as a substitute. 

Chief Bennet said last night: 

"I knew Howard Smith to be one of 
the best men I had. The accident is 
one of those which, it seems, is un- 
avoidable. The driver of the wagon 
is not to blame, as he had proceeded 
under Captain Smith's orders. Smith 
had the entire confidence of his supe- 
riors and I think that he was one of 
the best men in the department. I 
deeply regret the accident to-night 
more than I can now say." 

Captain Smith was recently made 
foreman at station No. 3 to fill the 
vacancy caused by the resignation of 
Capt. J. A. Browning. 

On the hose wagon at the time of 
the accident were Firemen Patterson 
Vaughn, Lott, Dohbs and Stanfield. 
Captain Smith had been riding in the 
scat with Fireman Stanfield. who was 
driving. He was a member of the 
Birmingham Firemen's Uelief Asso 
elation and was also a Meson, When. 
I he accident became knew n Si CI etai J 
Albert. '■-.on. Assistant Chief Walton, 
('apt. K. R. Johnson of station No. 7. 
Fireman Reeder of station No. 1 and 
Hydrant Inspector Thornton were sent 
to the hospital by Chief Bennet t to 
t0 look aft |] ( lap! . Smith's interests. 



They remained at his side until he ex- 
pired. Captain Smith was uncon- 
scious from the time the accident hap- 
pened until his death. 

The body was turned over to the 
Johns Undertaking Company last 
night to be prepared for burial. It 
will be sent to-day to his home at Hart- 
seile, where interment will be made. 

Captain Smith was quite popular 
among the firemen of the city as well 
as among others, and profound grief 
fills the ranks of the fire department. 
Especially is his death felt at his own 
charge, and last night "the boys" 
could not speak of the accident and 
keep the tears from welling in their 
eyes. 

An honoracy escort of firemen, to 
be assigned by Chief Bennett, will be 
sent with the body to Hartseile to-day. 



Texas Firemen Travel Free. 

Chief VVm. P. Bishop of the San An- 
tonio, Tex., fire department, has been 
advised by Assistant Attorney General 
Robertson that tire chiefs are entitled 
to use passes or other free transpor- 
tation arrangements with the railroads 
in traveling on official business. The 
particular question put by Chief 
Bishop concerned his traveling insp< c- 

bion of the lire apparatus of other 
Texas cities, for the hem tit of the San 
Antonio deparl ' d service, and 

he was assured that this w< uld he 
classed as official busim 

The amendment to the anti-pass law 

provides that bona tide firemen and 

police in the discharge of thi it 

as such may travel on free transport a- 

and this is held to include all 

bers of tin- paid fire d< partments, 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



A New System of Assignment. 

The Underwriters' Report says Bat- 
talion Chief Stevens of the Portland 
fire department has invented a system 
of assignment for the apparatus of the 
department in responding to alarms 
which is claimed to be superior to that 
of any assignment system in use in 
any fire department in the country. 
It was adopted by the fire committee 
of the Portland council last week and 
will b'e put into operation immediately 
to take the place of the antiquated 
assignment book which has been in 
use for many years. The new plan is 
quick, accurate, effective and auto- 
matic. It is said there can be no com- 
bination of fire alarms which this sys- 
tem will not work out automatically. 
It is a card system, and whenever an 
alarm is sounded the watchman in a 
fire company can readily see if his 
company is to respond on the first, 
second, third or fourth alarm. It can 
also be as readily ascertained just 
what is to be expected of each com- 
pany. Instead of notifying each 
company by telephone when one or 
more companies are out of commission 
for any reason, which takes several 
minutes, the operator will tap out the 
message to the various companies over 
the telegraph wires, which will go to 
each company simultaneously and will 
take but a few seconds. All officials 
of the city and fire department, as well 
as prominent insurance men, have 
voiced sentiments in favor of the new 
invention, as there has been much 
criticism of the Portland fire depart- 
ment owing to tardiness at fires. 

Charles W. Clark is Liberal to Firemen. 

The San Mateo Times says Chief 
Engineer Geo. W. Bartlett of the San 
Mateo Fire Department received a 
check from Charles W. Clark for $386 
in recognition of the services of the 
department in responding to a fire 
alarm at his residence on March 17. 

In his letter to the chief enclosing 
the check. Manager Conens of tin 
Clark ranch states that the sum oi 
$250 is given to the department as an 
acknowledgement and the balance is 
to be distributed among the members 
of the department who responded to 
the call. Each member is designated 
by name and the amount he is to re- 



ceive appended thereto. Mr. Clark 
expresses his warm thanks to the 
members for their prompt response 
and servicfs. Mr. Clark's home is in 
Hillsboro, which at present has nofire 
protection, but which recently voted 
$15,000 in bonds to establish a de- 
partment. 

Los Angeles Fire News. 

The recommendation of the fire com- 
mission that fire escapes be placed on 
all new buildings has been referred to 
Building Inspector Backus. 

Civil service examinations will be 
held this month for positions in the 
aqueduct, engineering, health, power, 
fire, housing and street departments 
of the city government. 

Wilshire's swell boulevard residen- 
tial district is to have a volunteer fire 
company. The city council has adopt- 
ed the recommendations of the fire 
commission, and will buy a reel and 
500 feet of two and one-half inch hose, 
which will be kept temporarily at the 
garage of Mrs. EllaLudwig, 101 South 
Manhattan Place. The new fire house 
will be located on Western avenue be- 
tween First and Second streets. 

Eighteen new fire hydrants will be 
established in Pico Heights district 
soon, according to a request sent by 
the fire commission recently to the 
water board. 

Former Fire Commissioner Hawley 
is causing to be circulated a proposed 
ordinance to be submitted at the May 
17 election, and under which all street 
cars will have to display on cards how 
many passengers they can carry. 
When that number is reached no more 
must be taken aboard. He would also 
have car fare limited to 5 cents within 
the city limits. 

The office of superintendent of fire 
alarm and police telegraph has been 
abolished by the city council, as the 
ordinance has been drawn and it con- 
tains a clause that will put it inti 
effect at once. The work will come 
inder a new official to be called elec- 
rical engineer, who will receive $250 
i month, and will supervise the in- 
stallation of the new fire alarm system. 

Fireboat 2, which was damaged 
while responding to an alarm several 
days ago, has been repaired at a cost 
of $1469 and is again in commission. 



Dog Puts Out Fire. 

A Louisville dispatch of recent dale 
says: "After distinguishing a fire 
caused by hot coals falling from a 
grate, a prize winning collie owned by 
W. J. Atkinson, awakened its master 
to have a look at his blistering paws. 
The dog sleeps on the rug in front of 
the grate and during the night live 
coals fell on the rug. Mr. Atkinson 
was aroused by the dog whining and 
scratching at his bedroom door. He 
arose and followed the dog to where 
it indicated the burned places in the 
rug with its nose. Then the dog ex- 
hibited its paws which had been blis- 
tered in beating out the blaze." 

At Hamilton, Ohio, March 14, two 
firemen were killed, one was fatally 
hurt and several others are missing in 
a fire which partially destroyed the 
Butler county court house. The men 
were buried when the high clock tower 
crashed over in the foyer. 

The members of the fire department 
of Marshfield, Ore., held a meeting 
Thursday evening, March 14, when 
the matter of endeavoring to secure 
from the city council a combined auto 
hose and chemical truck, to haul the 
fire engine to and from fires, came up 
for consideration. A committee was 
appointed, which will report at a sub- 
sequent meeting. 



Telephone 
Home C 2458 



Lamanet Bros. 

If the plac? of all places to gft th p VCTJ l«t«t »"d ^'1 in 'he way cf 

Firiin -ti's Regulation Shirty, 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

Hats and Underwear t Etc. 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



13th ANNUAL PICNIC «* ™e 




Veteran Firemen's Association 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

at Fairfax Park, Marin Co., Cal. 
SUNDAY, MAY 5, 1913 

Hoats leave Sausalito Ferry, foot of Market Stieet. every 
half hour from Sa.m.to^p. m. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Since the current century began 
there has been no more successful play 
than "The Chorus Lady," which will 
be the Alcazar's offering next Monday 
night and throughout the week. 
Written by James Forbes for Rose 
Stahl, it was used as a starring vehicle 
by the clever actress for five consecu- 
tive seasons, one of which was spent 
in England, and since she relinquished 
it several road companies have found 
it a profitable medium. Its release 
for stock use was instantly taken ad- 
vantage of by Belasco & Mayer, al- 
though the royalty demanded was 
almost prohibitive. They took it be- 
cause of the exceptional opportunities 
it would afford Florence Stone to ven- 
tilate both her comedy and emotional 
talents as Patricia O'Brien. There 
are four acts in the play, the places 
shown being O'Brien's home at the 
race track, the chorus room of a New 
York burlesque theatre, Crawford's 
apartments and the home of Patricia 
and Nora. 



FOR BETTER FIRE PROTECTION 

IN THE VILLAGE 

A SEAGRAVE 2-WHEEL HAND-DRAWN CHEMICAL 




J|^ nit SUMAVt COMPANY 1 
D BUILDERS OF 



GORHAM FIRE APPARATUS CO. 



SEATTLE 

216 Jackson Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Street 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 S. Olive Street 



Empress Theater. 



A special children's attraction, and 
one by reason of its novelty that will 
appeal strongly to grown-ups as well, 
will be presented during the coming 
week when George Auger, the tallest 
man in the world, and his lilliputian 
associates will present a thrilling dra- 
matization of ' 'Jack The Giant Killer. ' ' 
Direct from the Jardin Des Varieties, 
Paris, come Black and White, two 
young and beautifully formed women. 
A clever quartette. The Four Hodges, 
will offer some entertaining instru- 
mental numbers. The blackface ar- 
tists, Jennings and Renfrew, wi 
offer topical and popular melodies and 
some breezy dialogue. Rice, Elmer 
and Tom. eccentric gymnast enter- 
tainers, will give some idea of gmy- 
nastic agility. A farce, called "The 
Battle of Too Soon," will be presented 
by Francis Byron & Co. The Kraf- 
tons are conceded to be America's 
foremost hoop roller artists. Margaret 
Klose, a contralto singer, will presenl 
a selection of popular and semi-classi- 
cal songs. The newest novelty Kine- 
macolor pictures will complete the bill. 



American Rubber iV\fg. Co. 



9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories — Park Avenue and Walt Street, Oakland, Cal. 



WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 



Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose, Brass 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Department Supplies 



The Pacific Firkman $2.00 a year. 



When You're Buyin' Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

l_. H. 6c B. I. BILL 





Solo Distributors for the Pacific Const 



543 (inlden data Ave, Son Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



PACIFI^ 




IREMAN 



Allowances Made. 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 
BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manaeer 



Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 



Entered as second-class matter March 21. 1S0S. at the 
Postoffice at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 8. 1879. 



SATURDAY 



APRIL 6. 1912 



The Petaluma Courier comes to us an eight- 
page quarto, very much improved typographi- 
cally. 

At the ball grounds last Monday (the fire 
department being well represented) you may 
have heard something tike the following: 
"Ladies and Gentlemen — The battrees fer to- 
day will be-e-e," but what's the use— ask 
any one of the fire fans. 

An exchange says: "Lucky are the men 
who lose their conceit. As they journey 
through life their pouches of vanity flatten. 
The flattering process is the most important 
step in getting anywhere. Women are often 
responsible for this inflation, because they 
pump hot air into their heroes." 

Last Tuesday Governor Johnson issued a 
proclamation naming Thursday, April 18, as 
"Fire Prevention Day." Ranchers and tim- 
bermen are urged to devote the day to gath- 
ering and burning rubbish and taking other 
precautions to prevent grass, brush or forest 
fires during the dry months that follow. 

The Fire Commission estimates that it will 
cosl about a million dollars to replace horse- 
drawn vehicles with motor apparatus, and 
have requested that ihe Board of Supervisors 
set aside $2,600,000 for the proposed change, 
including the construction of some seven more 
new fire stations. 



Like Christmas, the opening of the base- 
hall season comes but once a year. The 
average fan could not stand the strain of 
many opening days. There is a limit to the 
stoutest nervous systems and the hardiest 
lungs. Energy must be conserved for the 
broiling afternoons ahead when the fan must 
work himself into a red and frazzled funk in 
behalf of his home team. 



We understand that Chief Dingman of the 
Manila Fire Department, accompanied by his 
wife and daughter, expects to sail from that 
rity about the 14th of April for the United 
S'ates, on an eight months' vacation. It is 
his intention to attend the International Con- 
vention of Fire Chiefs to be held in Denver 
in September, in order to obtain data for his 
department. Chief Dingman is the successor 
t't the late Hugh Banner, who organized the 
Manila Fire Department. It is the chief's 
fi st vacation in fourteen years. 



These cities make the following allowances 
in addition to salaries: 

Philadelphia, Pa., clothing allowance $40. 

San Antonio, Tex., clothing allowance $45. 

Camden, N. J., clothing allowance $50. 

Boston, Mass., helmets. 

Seattle, Wash., helmets. 

Denver, Col., helmets. 

Columbus, O. , helmets. 

Atlanta, Ga., helmets. 

Syracuse, N. Y., rubber coats and helmets. 

Birmingham, Ala., helmets. 

Richmond, Va., helmets. 

Dayton, O., rubber coats and helmets. 

Grand Rapids, Mich., helmets. 

Lowell, Mass., helmets, 

Cambridge, Mass., helmets. 

Spokane, Wash., rubber coats and helmets. 

Albany, N. Y., rubber coats and helmets. 

Trenton, N. J., rubber coats and helmets. 

San Antonio, Tex., helmets. 

Salt Lake City, Utah, helmets. 

Dallas, Tex., helmets. 

Lynn, Mass., helmets. 

Springfield, Mass., rubber coats and helmets 

Lawrence, Mass., rubbercoats and helmets. 

Somerville, Mass.. helmets. 

Fort Worth, Tex., helmets. 

Waterbury, Conn., rubbercoats and helmets 

Schnectady, N. Y., rubber coats and hel- 
mets, rubber boots. 

Manchester, N. H., helmets. 

Akron, O., helmets. 

Wilkesbarre, Pa., rubbercoatsand helmets. 

Peoria, 111., helmets. 

Savannah, Ga., uniforms. 

Portland, Me., uniforms. 

East St. Louis, 111.-, helmets, rubber coats 
and boots. 

Jacksonville, Fla., rubbercoatsand helmets 

Brockton, Mass., helmets. 

Johnstown, Pa., rubbercoatsand helmets. 

South Bend, Ind., helmets. 

Altoona, Pa., rubber coats. 

Pawtuckett, R.I., rubbercoats and helmets. 



Too Close for Comfort. 



Discussing the $200,000 fire which Los An- 
geles sustained recently, the Insurance and 
Investment News of March 28, says: 

"The constant menace of the fire fiend has 
been brought very close home in the last 
month. Two fires within that time have oc- 
curred in the block where the Insurance and 
Investment News office is located, with a total 
loss of about $200,000. The last one was in 
the next building, which is too close for com- 
fort. However, even when the danger is not 
brought so vividly to our attention, it is just 
as serious a menace. That $500 a minute is 
going up in smoke somewhere every sixty 
seconds." 

In the same issue, "J. H. M.," under the 
caption, "A Doubtful Economy," writes: 

"The proposition to save money by building 
and installing its own fire boxes has been 
suggested to the Los Angeles council. This 
is a matter in which it will be wise to go slow. 
Making a fire alarm system which will be 
efficient, and, above all, reliable, is no job for 



an amateur. With the several competing 
companies now in the field, the price should 
be as low as is consistant with quality. There 
is no reason why the installation of boxes and 
wires cannot be done by the city, after the 
general system is once installed, but it should 
be under the direction of a thoroughly compe- 
tent city electrician, whose tenure of office 
should be entirely free from political inter- 
ference. There has been too much politics in 
this matter in the past, and the result has 
been unreasonable and dangerous delay." 

Firemen Oppose Two-Platoon. 

That he may understand their position in 
regard to the two-platoon system, provided 
for in the Harte bill, a committee represent- 
ing the Firemen's Mutual Benevolent Asso- 
ciation, Rochester, N. Y., has explained to 
Commissioner of Public Safety Owen that 
the association has voted not to take any 
action in the matter and it is generally un- 
derstood that the members of the organiza- 
tion, as a whole, are against tht system, 
although there are certain members of the 
Rochester fire department who would like to 
see the measure passed. 

In the committee that waited upon the 
commissioner were Capt. John H. Frazer, 
engine company 17; Lieut. Chas. A. Widdow- 
son, engine company 14, and Hoseman Frank 
Richardson, hose company 12. Commissioner 
Owen is opposed to the two-platoon system 
which, he says, would mean an increase in 
the membership of the Rochester fire depart- 
ment of 150 men. Chief Little is strongly 
opposed to the system and it is said that a 
majority of the captains in the department 
are, also. 

Subdues Fire With Music. 



The Underwriters' Report of April 4 edi- 
torially says: 

"The fire fiend has encountered a formida- 
ble opponent in a vaudeville performer now 
appearing at a San Franoisco playhouse. 
This individual nightly extinguishes a burning 
gas flame by singing gently to the red- 
tongued monster. The performer explains 
the phenomena by claiming that the human 
voice pitched to the same tone as that pro- 
duced by fire will subjugate any flame, no 
matter how violent. He believes that the 
time will come when fire engines will give 
way to huge tuning forks which will require 
but vibration to overcome a fire. Whether 
the same agency may be effectually employed 
to arrest a conflagration has not been stated 
by the fire-tamer. Underwriters who are 
constantly seeking means to cut down the 
nation's fire waste are respectfully referred 
to a consideration of the methods of the mu- 
sical flame-quencher." 

Joe Feldhaus intends to build two flats on 
his lots across the street from the engine 
house and recently gave his automobile a coat 
of paint. He says it's not true that his ma- 
chine burns Veronica water instead of gaso- 
line, and says that story was invented by 
"Ferris" Hartman of truck 1. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



San Francisco Fire Commissioners 

met in regular session Thursday, April 4, 
all members being present, and transacted 
considerable routine business, from which we 
take the following: 

Communication from Wm. E. Hardnedy 
hoseman engine 13, submitting his resigna- 
tion dated March 27, as a member of this de- 
partment, to take effect immediately. The 
committee will recommend the acceptance of 
this resignation. On April 2 Mr. Hardnedy 
appeared before the committee and asked 
for a reconsideration of his resignation, but 
this committee does not feel that any one has 
a right to withdraw his resignation, and that 
a resignation once handed in terminates the 
employment of the party resigning. More- 
over, independent of this consideration, your 
committee does not favor granting this re- 
quest for withdrawal. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
recommending the transfer of Peter D. Ho- 
ran, hoseman engine 1 to hoseman engine 10. 
Recommended for approval. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
submitting complaints of Battalion Chief S. 
D. Russell against Hoseman G. Giblin, dated 
March 30 and April 1, for absence without 
leave. Recommend that charges be preferred. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
submitting complaint against Truckman Hen- 
berry, truck 3, for being under the influence 
of liquor while working at *-i fire from box 88 
March 21. The administrative committee, 
after investigation, is in serious doubts as to 
whether Henneberry was not suffering gen- 
uinely from some ailment at that time. His 
manner indicated an irresponsible stupor 
rather than the effects of liquor. Under the 
circumstances, we recommend that he be 
given the benefit of the doubt and that no 
official action be taken in the matter. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
recommending t he transfer of Chas. Claveau, 
hoseman relief engine 3 to hoseman engine 26. 
Recommended for approval. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
recommending (hat water tower 2 go into 
service on April 16 at the quai lers of engine 
6 on Seventh street, with a crew of four 
men one captain, one lieutenant, one driver 
and one hoseman Recommend) d for approval, 

Communication from the civil service com- 
mission, in response to a communication dated 
March 28. requesting tin- cert dual ion of 
twelve i-ML'iUes far bupnninXmcui to positions 
as tMifinet rs of lire engines, informing us 
that the eligible list lor said class is at pres- 
ent exhausted and atfrrinrizing us to make 
temporary appointments of eleven engineers 
of flre enginei for a period not exceeding 
thirty days. Recommend it be placed on file 

i lommunicution from the board of chiefs ol 
this department, recommending the in 
Btallation of the card system in place of the 
assign men i book now in use in this depart- 
ment, Recommended for approval. 

< immunication from i he chief engineer, 
submitting complain! of Acting Hat t a lion 
Chief Grote againal John J, Tomalty, hose- 
man engine 23, for being under the influence 



of liquor while on duty. Recommended that 
charges be filed. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
recommending the following transfers; E. 
Reilly, hoseman water tower 1 to driver 
chemical 1; Chas. Molloy, hoseman engine 7 
to hoseman engine 13; P. Horan, hoseman 
engine 1 to hoseman engine 10; Wm. John- 
son, hoseman engine 26 to hoseman engine 24; 
Cha9. Claveau, hoseman relief engine 3 to 
hoseman engine 26. Recommended for ap- 
proval. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
recommending that the animal vacations of 
members of the department, fifteen, days, 
commence 8 a. m. May 1, 1912. Recommend- 
ed for approval. 

Communication from John T. Lahey, lieut. 
engine 18, making application for a leave of 
of absence for one year from April 16, with- 
out pay, from his regular rank and position 
as lieutenant. Recommend he be granted 
thirty days leave without pay. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
submitting report of Drillmnster Cullen, re- 
lative to the rating of members in drill prac- 
tice at the drill towerand recommending that 
the same be entered in the official book of 
ratings. Recommended for approval. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
submitting report of Supt. of Engines Birm- 
ingham on the gasoline tank recently installed 
at quarters of chemical 3 by the Bowser Co. , 
stating that the same had been completed in 
a satisfactory manner. Recommend it be 
accepted: 

Plans were approved for chemical 12, to be 
located at Nineteenth avenue between Q and 
R streets. 

Dr. Tulfer of the board of health is acting 
as department physician and surgeon. 

Win- Sheper, engine 17, tendered his resig- 
nation and it, was accepted. 

Wm. Matheson, engine 6, was deprived of 
21) days' pay. 

The civil service commission was requested 
to certify six hydrantmen. 

Objects to Civil Service. 

Police Chief Moyer of Long Beach, backed 
by the mayor and police commission, last 
Monday urged the cuy council to abolish the 
civil service rules governing the appointment 
of policemen. The police chief said thai un- 
der the present rules it was impossible io em- 
ploy thoroughly competent nun in main 
cases. Chief Moyei alho urged an mcrea.se of 
the police force and the enlargement ol the 
police station. 

Ed. Kinpof truck 1, who recently sustained 
a very serious rccidenl while coming down 
i ho polo in 1 1 .- poioiML' io :.n alarm, is a I Si . 
ii> eph's Hospital, and \* doing us well as 
could be expected under the circumstances, 
We understand his leg was pul in a pi 
c:ist Wednesday, and with good nursing the 
doctors have every hope of sa\ tng i I Bid 

King calls il.iilv :il thti hospital and assists 

the nurse in administering to her husband's 

W . i n t s . 



Around the Bay. 

On April 30 the citizens of Alameda will 
vote on the issuance of bonds to enlarge the 
municipal lighting plant, and also to improve 
the police department and purchase new appa- 
ratus for the fire department. 

The Oakland police and firemen will have 
daily drills and military setting-up exercises 
as a result of the recent visit of Civil Service 
Commissioners Lower and Miles of Chicago. 
The object of this drill is to keep the men in 
good physical condition, and not allow them 
to take on too much surplus weight. Annual 
medical and physical examinations will also 
be held, and all the men that fail to come up 
to the required mark will be ousted. 

Numerous complaints have been received 
by the Oakland commissioners regarding the 
lack of fire protection and the inadequate 
water mains and fire hydrants. The new 
charter gives the commissioners power to 
compel the water company to lay certain size 
mains and install a specified size hydrant. 
They also have power to lay certain size 
mains and rent them to the water company 
should they deem it advisable. The commis- 
sioners expect to take some action along this 
line in the near future. 

Fire broke out in the Oakland city prison, 
which is located in the basement of the City 
Hall, last week, and for a time threatened to 
smoke out the occupants. The jailor, upon 
investigating, found that a mattress in a cell 
occupied by one of the prisoners was on fire 
and promptly extinguished it by flooding the 
cell with water. No damage was done other 
than the burning of the bedding. 

If we please others, why not you? 
O'Connor, the Florist, 2756 Mission street. 
Phone Mission 5988. 



Captain Kenueally says he doesn't want the 
earth. Give him a bottle of hair restorer 
that will restore and he'll go on- his way re- 
joicing. 

This is the latest lay of Lieut. Roebling of 
engine '-: 

O, to be happy once again, 
0, to be young and free. 
To have no care for the words of men, 
To be as I used to I"'. 



Engine company :!7, truck 10 and chemical 
10 have eaug hi I he shawl-making craze. 
Lieut. Dougherty believes that shawls will 

again come in fashion. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Victor Victrolas 

Columbia Grafonolas 

Victor ami Columbia Records 
atigati < Hir W »■ Club Plan 

KOHLER & GHASE 

20 O'JPARRELL STREET 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 

JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boyuets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening, Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Reach Nurseries, take Castro street car to 23rd, or 

Mission, 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



Phone Home J 2549 

EiVHL, SgHOEIVBElIS. 

Fireman Cap Maker 

Formerly of 2 1 si and Folsom 
...WILLIAMS.-. BUILDING... 

THIRD STREET 

Cor. Mission. Room 307 SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Market 4720 



Dr. A. Gertrude Frost 

CHIROPODIST 

Rooms 8-9 
1154 MARKET STREET San Francisco 



NA/M. F. EGAN 

M. R. C. V. S. 

..VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D.. 



1155 nouDEN DATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 

M. U MILCOVICH. Prop. 

Martin's Restaurant and Grill 

1533 STEINER STREET 



Telephone Douglas 287 1 Home C 4992 

WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRANT BROKERS 



630 KEARNY STREET 

COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFICFIREMAN 

JOB DEPARTMENT 

IS NOW PREPARED TO PRINT 

LETTER HEADS 

BILL HEADS 

INVOICES 

STATEMENTS 

ENVELOPES 

BUSINESS CARDS 

WEDDING INVITATIONS 

DANCE PROGRAMS 

PERSONAL CARDS 

SHIPPING TAGS 

BILLS OF FARE, ETC 

479 TURK STREET 
Phone FRANKLIN 6867 



Telephone Douglas 1235 



L. J. BORCK, THE TAjLOR 



MAKES A SPECIALTY OF 

FOREMEN'S '. ' UINIPORIVIS 

ALSO FINE CIVILIAN SUITS 



93 EDDY STREET 



San Francisco 



Phone Merrill 4447 



H. G. WILLIAMS 



Afrent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 



1248 Thirteenth Avenue, Oakland 



Phone Kesrny 3523 Home C 1780 

JOE. H. ROSENBERG 

(Eitttl anu fBililaru, Sailor 

73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 
Louii Frankenbeig, formerly with Rosenblum 6c Abraham, Manaaer 



Home phone S 2517 

The Little Emporium 

L. R1ZNIC Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 
2296-98 GEARY STREET 

Near Broderick 
Telephone We.1 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



The telephone operators in New York City 
handle lso.ooo rails every rush hour. They will 
connect you with any oue of SOO.OOO subscribers 
in h;ilf a minute. 

Ask the exchange manager how he can handle 
ail these calls, and he will tell you tersely, "By 
saving the seconds." 

"Schedule time" is the keynote of American 
Industry. That means Howard time. There's 

always somebody higher up holding a Howard 

Watc! the Job demanding the Howard type 

of accuracy and punctuality. 

The Howard Is the one wateh in the world 
wholly adapted to modern progress. U has 
the precise construction and the scientific ad- 
justment. 

A Howard Wateh Is always worth whal 
pay for it. 

The pi Ice <>f each watch— from the 17-Jewel 
(double roller) in a Crescent Extra or Jas. Boss 
Extra gold-filled case at MO, to the 23 -jewel at 
$150. and the Edward Howard model at $350 — 

is fixed at the faction and a printed ticket at- 
tached. 

Find the Howard jeweler in your town and 

talk to him, Not evei v jeweler can < I 

Howard. The jeweler who can Is a Rood man 

t.. know. 
Admiral Slgsbee has written a little 
"The Log of the Howard Watch," giving the 
record Of his own Howard in the r. S, X 
You'll enjoy it. Drop us a post-card, DepL X, 
and we'll send you a copy. n 

HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston, M 

T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AIND JEWELRY 

71 WALLE.R ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 

SALVAR 

(I Will Save) 

The Greatest BLOOD REMEDY in the World 

WILL CURE 

RHEUMATISM 

Acute or Chronic 



BLOOD POISON 



Acquired or Hereditary 



PARALYSIS 
CATARRH 
MALARIA 



Diseases of Liver, Kidneys and Bladder 



Diseases Peculiar to Women 



$10.00 FOR 40 TO 60 DAYS' TREATMENT 

Call or Write for our 100 Page Bdoklei 



TO THE PU BLIC 

In offering Salvar to the public, we do so 
with perfect confidence, and state publicly our 
willingness to have our remedy thoroughly tested 
in any fair and equitable manner, in the treat- 
ment of all diseases we claim it will relieve, and 
we will abide by a decision so given and dis- 
continue its sale at once if it is found different in 
any particular from what it is represented to be. 

SE1TZ & MILLS. Agents 
1403 Market St., near 10th, San Francisco 




VOL. IX. -NO. 16 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, APRIL 20, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



San Francisco's High Pres- 
sure System. 

Under the above caption, the San 
Francisco correspondent of the Fire 
and Water Engineering, in a recent 
issue of that paper says: 

With the completion of the high 
pressure system, San Francisco will 
be protected against fire as well as any 
other city in this country, and with 
this protection will come a liberal re- 
duction in insurance rates. The Su- 
pervisors and the Board of Public 
Works are hurrying the work to com- 
pletion, and it is their sincere hope 
that within the next few months 
the reservoirs, pumping stations, pipe 
lines, etc., will be in readiness for 
service should an emergency arise. 

The building of this system is a 
gigantic task and that more than 90 
per cent of it is completed reflects 
great credit on the officials who have 
it in charge. The system in general 
will consist of a network of large 
mains, specially built to minimize cor- 
rosive and galvanic action, and will 
extend from the water front to Devi- 
sadero street and out. Mission street to 
Twenty-ninth. This portion of the 
system is being built in units, so thai 
in the event of a bieak or other trou- 
ble a suction, as small as a block, can 
be cut out without, impairing the use 
fulness or efficiency of the remainder 
of the pipe line. 

A series of gates and valves is so 
arranged that, any trouble on the pipe 
line can be remedied within a brief 
time. These pipes will always lie 
kepi filled wit li fresh water supplied 



by three reservoirs, one on Twin 
Peaks, holding 10,000,000 gallons, one 
near Ashbury and Seventeenth streets, 
with a capacity of 600,000 gallons, and 
a third on Clay street hill will hold 
1,000,000 gallons. These reservoirs 
are all located on high elevations and 
are interconnected by double lines of 
pipes so that the destruction of one 
line of pipe will not prevent the feed- 
ing of the other reservoirs. 

Owing to the high elevation of the 
reservoirs there will be a high pres- 
sure at the hydrants connected with 
the main pipelines. Engineers figure 
that the combined reservoirs will be 
able to supply as much water, with a 
pressure equal to that furnished by 
twenty fire engines, for nearly sixteen 
hours. The reservoirs will be kept 
supplied with water by two pumping 
stations, having a combined capacity 
of 4, 000,000 gallons in the twenty-four 
hours. This water will be furnished 
by subterranean flows in the neigh- 
borhood of the stations. 

In addition to the two fresh water 
pumping stations there will be two 
salt water pumping stations, one in 
the North Beach district and the other 
at Townsend and Second sire. is. 
These stations will be equipped with 
the latest machinery and will be capa- 
ble of pumping 16,000 gallons a minute 
with the pressure of 300 pounds a 
square inch. Steam w ill be Kept up 
in the stations at all times, and every- 
thing in readiness to till the mains 
with salt watershould the fresh water 
in the reservoirs become exhausted 
or renden d unavailable. 

A eoinp nt and very important 

pari of the system is furnished 



by the two fireboats, David Scannell 
and Dennis T. Sullivan, protecting the 
city's 15 miles of water front. Ten 
connective points for the system have 
been provided along the water front, 
and in case of necessity the boats can 
supply 9,000 gallons of water per min- 
ute against 150 pounds pressure. In 
addition, each wharf has hydrant con- 
nections for twenty lines of hose, in 
the event of a large fire in the imme- 
diate vicinity of the harbor front. 

Should the big pipe lines, pumping 
stations and reservoirs fail in the hour 
of need, there is still another supply 
of water to fall back upon. One hun- 
dred first-class reinforced concrete fire 
cisterns, each holding approximately 
75,000 gallons water, have been distri- 
buted throughout the city and are avail- 
able for use should other supplies fail. 

This system will cost in the neigh- 
borhood of $5,500,000, but the outlay 
will be saved to the city within a short 
lime. It is estimated that there will 
be a saving of at least $1,000,000 a 
year in insurance premiums when the 
completed system is in operation. The 
city at present is paying approximate- 
ly .$4,(100,00(1 annually for insurance 
premiums, but owing to the high rates 
charged the merchants are not able to 
lake out more than about half the in- 
surance they need. 



Riverside has ordered two 80 horse 
power Seagrave air-cooled combina- 
tion chemical a hose wagons. B 
are to be equipped with the draw -bars 
patented by Chief Almgren, San Diego, 
as the Riverside people intend to draw 
their steam lire engine with one of 
the new machines. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Pasadena Fire News. 

Fire Chief Clifford at last Monday's 
session of the Fire Commission, re- 
commended that all horse-drawn a 
ratus now in use be di d < 

self-propelled vehicles be purchased to 
take its place. He asked that an ap- 
propriation aggregating $70,800 be 
made, the money to be obtained either 
by direct tax or bond issue. 

An automobile pumping engine and 
a chemical and ho ir the 

Hurlliut street station, and an auto 
aerial truck for use in the business 
section of the city, are the nieces that 
are most needed, according to Chief 
Clifford. 

Included in the recommendation is 
the suggestion that a lot be purch 
as a site for a new tirehouse in the 
southeast part of the city. 

Chief Clifford declares that by con- 
verting the fire department into a 
modern department, and doing away 
with horses altogether, the city will 
be saved the expenditure of approxi- 
mately $8,060 a year in the running 
expenses of the department. He says 
the horses and vehicles now in use 
may be sold for about $8000. 

Mayor Thum stated that the fire de- 
partment will be reorganized next fall. 

Frank May, the new commissioner, 
attended Monday's session. 

Dog Saves Three Firemen. 

"Happy," a dog, saved the lives of 
three firemen recently by leading a 
rescue party up a ladder to the third 
floor of No. 2287 Third avenue. New 
York, a warehouse, where the three 
men were caught in a room so filled 
with smoke they could not find their 
way to the window to which the lad- 
der ends were hooked. The dog- is a 
Dalmatian hound owned by Charles 
Norton, one of the firemen caught in 
the smoke. The names of the two 
other firemen are John Heemsath and 
Wm. Bornholtz. 

Happy heard the cries of the three 
men above the noise and excitement 
in the street. Thousands of specta- 
tors wondered at the strange actions 
of the dog as he began slowly climb- 
ing the ladder up which the firemen 
had gone several minutes before. 
Happy was half way up the ladder 
when firemen in the street dimly saw 



figures app< ar b< fore the open window 
an instant and then vanish. 

A rescue party at once started up 
the ladder behind the animal. When 
the men entered the window they 
found Norton, Heemsath and Born- 
holtz fumbling helplessly along the 
wall trying to find tin window. Nor- 
ton, who took Happy to the house of 
engine company No. 36 six years ago, 
when the animal was only a puppy, 
carried the dog down in his arms. 

Los Angeles Pensions. 

The proposed ordinance providing a 
pension for the police and fire depart- 
ments at Los Angeles. Cal., may be 
tabled. The finance committee will 
recommend such action to the council 
at once. If it pleases, the new council 
can take the matter up later on. 

The measure, which has met the 
disapproval of the finance committee, 
would set aside money each year from 
the general tax fund to pay the pen- 
sions of disabled policemen and fire- 
men and their widows and orphans. 
The policemen and firemen now pay 
themselves pensions from a mutual 
beneficiary fund. This fund is pro- 
vided by State law and each employe 
of the police and fire departments 
pays $2 a month into the pension fund. 
It is administered by the police and 
fire commissions. 

An amendment to the city charier 
adopted last February provides that 
the city shall furnish the money for 
pensions, and it was to provide the 
machinery to carry out the terms of 
this amendment that the proposed or- 
dinance was introduced. 

Trouble at Tonopah. 

Friction has been aroused between 
the volunteer and paid fire depart- 
ments of Tonopah, Nev., as a result 
of an occurrence during a small fire. 
The volunteer department was the first 
on the scene and the firemen were 
making ready to attach their hose to 
the nearest hydrant when the paid 
department arrived and ordered them 
away. This has caused considerable 
comment, both sides to the contro- 
versy having many adherents. The 
volunteers also claim that it is the duty 
of the paid department to visit each 
hose house daily, examine hose, noz- 
zles and see if spanners are in their 
proper places. Lately the spanners 
had been stolen from No. 1 hose cart's 
tool box, 



A New Fire Fighter. 

While a good deal has been said of 
late about excessive losses by fire, less 
has been said about the losses by 
water suffered in putting the fires out. 
This is almost always disproportionate, 
and in the case of volunteer fire com- 
panies is often more to be dreaded 
than the fire loss itself. A new fire 
fighter has been introduced in the 
shape of carbon tetrachlorid, a clear, 
colorless, volatile liquid, with an 
agreeable aromatic odor. It is non- 
inflammable and non-explosive, and its 
vapors readily extinguish fire. It 
comes in hundred-gallon drums, and 
smaller quantities are sold in contain- 
ers. Improved methods of manufac- 
turing chlorin and cabon disulphid 
make the new substance relatively in- 
expensive. 

The Pacific Fireman $2.00 a year. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 



Victor Victrolas 



Columbia Grafonolas 

Victor and Columbia Records 

Inventigate Our New Club Plan 

KOHLER & CHASE 

26 O'FAHREU. STREET 

13th ANNUAL PICNIC <"= the 




Veteran Firemen's Association 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

at Fairfax Park. Marin Co.. Cal. 
SUNDAY, .MA'S - S, 1Q13 



Boats leave Sausaliio Ferry, footof Market Street every 

half hum from 8 a. m. to h p. m. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

"Seven Days," than which no fun- 
nier American farce has been written, 
will be the Alcazar's attraction next 
Monday evening and throughout the 
week, with Florence Stone, Wilson 
Melrose and all the members of the 
regular company in the cast. How 
well adapted to fun-making these peo- 
ple are was recently demonstrated by 
their work in "The Blue House" and 
later in the humorous scenes of "The 
Chorus Lady." More opportunities 
for laugh-getting are afforded by 
"Seven Days" than in both those 
offerings combined. There is never a 
let-up in its appeal to the risibles. 
Mary Roberts Rinehart and Avery 
Hopwood collaborated in constructing 
"Seven Days." They quarantine a 
lot of people in a house supposed to 
contain a case of smallpox and keep 
them there a week, during which period 
many ludicrous complications occur. 

Empress Theatre. 

Thn public having taken kindly to 
the larger and more expensive offer- 
ings sent over the Sullivan & Considine 
circuit, announcement is made that 
"The Devil and Tom Walker," carry- 
ing eighteen people, will be the fea- 
tured attraction at the Empress, 
starting with the matinee Sunday af- 
ternoon. TheApolloTrio of sensational 
atheleteswill present a classic offering 
in posing, of reproductions of famous 
works of art. Munford and Thomp- 
son, two funny chaps, will be seen in 
a singing and talking act. Louise 
Carver and Tom Murry. two perform- 
ers who were with Lew Fields' "Hen- 
pecks," will present an eccentric sing- 
ing and dancing specialty. Joseph 
Spissel and Co. will present "A Sol- 
dier's Dream." A whistlerof unusual 
ability in the person of Lee Zimmer- 
man will whistle some popular and 
classic melodies. Ceorgia Edison and 
Edna Howard, in a dainty singing and 
dancing act ; Leslie. Santoi & Co., in a 
sckotch called "The Back woods Man, " 
and the famous Kinemacolor pictures 
will complete an unusually strong bill. 

Fire station dog that used to follow 
the horses to lires now refuses to ac- 
company the motor apparatus. Too 
bad. Isn't there some way to make 
gasoline smell like oats and hay? 



FOR BETTER FIRE PROTECTION 
in the: village: 

a seagrave 2-wheel hand-drawn chemical 




GORHAM FIRE APPARATUS CO. 



SEATTLE 
216 Jackson Street 


SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Street 


LOS ANGELES 
1223 S. Olive Street 


American 


Rubber 


Mfg. Co. 



9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories— Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 



WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 



Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose, Brass 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Department Supplies 

When You're Buyin 9 Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

L. H. &. B. I. BILL 

Sole Distributors for the Pacific Const 543 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 





PACIFIC F1KE M A N 




PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BV ■ 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 
To whom all checks ami money orders shirajd* • 
be made payable. 
H. G PRESTON ., Bui 



Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Tuf 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin I 



Entered as second-sj^ 
Postoffice at San Fn 
Kress of March 3. 1879. 



_ 2],-t908. at the 
Bop the Act of Con- 



SATURDAY 



Jl'l. 



20. 1912 

The eligible list of firemen will be given tb 
the press Monday. In a^jrobability some«if. 
the papers will publislTtjSi mmes of those 
receiving 75 per cent anckojgljE*^. 

The first fire engine for, Chile arrived from 
France March 1st for the Mfth Fire Brigade 
at Santiago. It weighs 5750 pounds and has 
a speed of twenty-seven miles per hour on 
the level. The engine is 120 horse power and 
is capable of throwing a one-inch stream a 
distance of 220 feet. 

A singular state of affairs existed previous 
to the April election in Eureka, Cal , owing 
to ihe "wet" and "dry" agitation. The 
trustees claim if the "drys" carried the elec- 
tion th^y would he unable to purcha se 
any motor fire apparatus, which the enter- 
prising citizens favored. 



At Thursday- night's meeting of the Fire 
Commission R. S. Chapman told the commis- 
sioners, during the discussion on specifica- 
tions, that Charlie Taber was the best sales- 
man he knew, and the combination of the 
American -La France apparatus with the 
Taber "bull" would be a proposition impossi- 
ble to beat. 



The trustees of Sacramento recently opened 
bids for the purchase of two auto chemical 
engines for use in the residence districts at 
the two new fire stations. The fire com- 
mittee of the trustees^-was in San Francisco 
recently looking over the different machines, 
and it is expected that a recommendation to 

purchase will shortly be made. 

_^ 

The awful lo* ofjlife, by the wreck of the 

Titanic has cas| a gfoOJlfWfc #? gnSire^tflin- 

try. both heietyid abroad. That the newest 

and great est- : li&'r in the world, built at a cost 

of ten million dollars and embodying all the 

latest scientific principles, sinks.as quickly as 

a wooden fishing smack^a^Sjer a coljisiojikwith 

an iceberg off the coast of Newfoundland, is 

the wonder of the twentieth century. 

We had the pleasure this week of meeting 
Frank T. Kennedy, the new Secretary of the 
Fire Commission.- Mr. Kennedy was for- 
merly with the H. S. Croclrer Co. for over 
fifteen vears, starting in as a mere youth and 
finally working up until he became one of the 
most trusted salesmen of that firm. Frank 
is already familiar with all the intricacies of 
the service, and people having business with 
the department will find him always ready 
and willing to impart any information in con- 
nection with fire department matters. 



Oakland Fire News. 

tSpecial Correspondence. I 

The new ordinance regulating the use of 
motor-driven apparatus in the moving picture 
theatres, provides that where motor-driven 
film machines are u<-ed a fireman must be 
stationed in the room, and this man will be 
paid at the rateof $120a month, which means 
that the motor-driven apparatus will be a 
thing of the past, as the added expense is 
said to be prohibitive. The ordinance also 
provides for the keeping of three buckets of 
water in place of two, and that the doors of 
the operating rooms shall be left unlocked so 
as to provide easy inspection by the city 
officials. 

The Gorham Fire Apparatus Co. asked for 
an extensidti of time to May 20 to make de- 
livery of the new motor-propelled combina- 
tion chemical engine and hose wagon. This 
was reduced by the commissioners to May 1. 

Fire of an unknown origin broke out in the 
California Cotton Mills last week, and for a 
time threatened to do considerable damage. 
Thedepartment responded promptly and after 
some difficulty extinguished the blaze which 
originated in a pile of jute. 

The failure of Chief Ball to insert a penalty 

I clause in his specifications for fire apparatus 

for the Thirteenth avenue and Elmhurst fire 

houses is causing Commissioner Turner no 

end of trouble. 

The contract was let to the Webb Motor 
Fire Apparatus Co. on Oct. 31, 1911, and they 
were allowed 150 days from that date in 
which to deliver the apparatus. The time 
expired on March 29. Now they ask for an 
extension of time until May 1. 

These two engine houses are in thickly set- 
tled communities and these districts have ab- 
solutely no fire proteclion at the present time, 
and nothing can be done until the Webb Com- 
pany fill their contract. As there was no 
penalty clause the commissioners have no 
other alternative than to allow the extension 
of time. 

Per Capita Fire Loss in United States. 

Under the above heading a late issue of the 
Chicago Tribune says: 

The actual fire loss per capita in the United 
States is $2.51 as compared with six leading 
countries of Europe, which show 33 cents a 
.year. The cost of fire insurance in America, 
reduced to a per capita basis, is $1.53 as com- 
pared with 20 cents per person in Europe. 

Since 1882 there has not been a year when 
the fire loss in the United States has not run 
over $100,000,000. If the fire loss in this 
country for the last thirty-five years had 
been on the European ratio instead of whtt 
it actually was, the saving would have 
amounted to more than the total value of all 
the farm and factory buildings in the United 
States. 

Leaving out forest fires and marine losses, 
but including the excess cost of fire protec- 
tion due to bad construction and excess of 
premiums over insurance paid, the total cost 
of fires last year was $456,455,000. This was 
more than the total value of gold, silver, cop- 



per and petroleum produced in the United 
Slates that year. It wasalmost exactly one- 
half the cost of the building construction in 
the entire country during the same year. 

Los Angeles. 

Last Monday morning Councilman Betk- 
ouski returned from San Francisco, whither 
he went to see a cemonstration of the Gorham 
fire engine, the purchase of one which at 
$0000 is being considered by the council. He 
says it is a great machine. 

Chief Eley appealed to the Fire Commission 
last Monday morning for a $12,000 fireboat at 
the harbor. The contract with the two tugs 
there now, he said, was not sufficient, as 
either tug might be a mile outside the break- 
water when a fire broke out and would be 
useless. 

The Underwriters' Report says there is a 
bitter fight in progress between the Fire 
Commission and Fire Chief Eley and repre- 
sentatives of the fire department supply com- 
panies over the rejection of hose furnished on 
bids accepted by the commission. The hose 
is being turned down by the chief on the 
1 ground that it does not meet specifications. 
It is alleged by the agents of three brands of 
hose turned down that Chief Eley is deter- 
mined upon having Paragon hose at $1.10 
a foot. __^_ 

San Diego. 

While fighting a fire in the basement of 920 
Fifth street early last Monday morning, W. 
McClure and R. E. Strausser, two firemen of 
engine company 2, were overcome for want 
of oxygen and had to be carried to the engine 
house, where both received medical attention. 
When Dr. F. H. Smith was called to attend 
Strausser, he found the fireman had no pulse 
and was in such condition that for a time he 
was considered in danger. The physician 
soon brought him to his senses. McClure was 
not so seriously affected. 

New Hydrants. 

At last week's meeting of the Fire Com- 
mission Chief Murphy submitted a list of new 
hydrants which was recommended for ap- 
, proval by the Board, as follows: 

Geary street, northeast corner Thirty-third 
I avenue, 4 inch. 

McAllister street, northeast corner Web- 
ster, 4 inch. 

Polk street, southeast corner Union, 5 inch. 

Frederick street, south side 220 feet west 
Willard, 5 inch. 

Twenty-fifth street, southwest corner of 
Homestead, 5 inch. 

Railroad avenue, west side, opposite south 
line of Shafter avenue, 4 inch. 



Firemen's Mutual Aid Association. 

The following is the result of the votes cast 
for the adoption of the new constitution and 
by-laws of the San Francisco Fire Depart- 
ment Mutual Aid Association, held April 
10, 1912: 

For the New Constitution and By-Laws 505 

Against " " " " _27 

Total vote 532 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



San Francisco Fire Commissioners 

met in regular session Thursday, April 18, 
all members being present, and transacted 
considerable routine business, from which we 
take the following: 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Imposing of penalty in matter of George 
Moesch, hoseman fireboat 2, for being under 
the influence of intoxicating liquor while on 
duty on April 3, 1912. Laid over to Friday, 
April 19, at 7:30 p. m. 

Imposing of penalty in matter of John J. 
Tnmalty, hoseman engine 23, for being under 
the influence of intoxicating liquor while on 
duty on March 31, 1912. Laid over to Friday, 
April 19, at 7:30 p. m. 

Imposing of penalty in matter of George 
E. Giblin, hoseman engine 21, for absenting 
himself from duty without permission on 
March 28 and 30, 1912. Laid over to Friday, 
April 19, at 7:30 p. m. 

Consideration of bids: Motor hose wagons, 
motor-driven hose tenders, tractors, automo- 
biles for battalion chiefs. Laid over to Fri- 
day, April 19, at 7:30 p. m. 

Civil service certification of John J. Brady as 
engineer of fire engine company. Approved. 

Resolution temporarily appointing twelve 
members of the department as engineers for 
a period not toexceed thirty days. Approved. 

Civil service certification of five eligible 
hydrantmen for appointment. F. J. Dillon, 
A. F. Wynn. 

Communication from civil service commis- 
sion authorizing the Board to make tempo- 
rary appointment of a superintendent of en- 
gines for a period not to exceed thirty days 
from April 8. Laid over to Friday, April 19, 
at 7:30 p. m. 

Communication from Chief Engineer Mur- 
phy, submitting reports from the superinten- 
dent of engines relative to the operation of 
the corporation yard and repair shops of the 
department. Laid over to Friday, April 19, 
at 7:30 p. m. 

Resolution appointing Jas. Burke as tempo- 
rary drayman in ^he department. Appointed. 

Resolution requesting the civil service com- 
mission to certify the names of eligibles for 
appointment in ibis department to fill vacan- 
cies that will exist, during the month of May. 
Approved. 

NEW BUSINESS. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
submitting report from Battalion Chiel Mi- 
rli.i.-l linden in regard to repairing runway in 
fronl of quarters of engine company 85 and 
recommending thai theatteniion of the board 
of public winks be railed to this with a view 
to having same attended to. Recommended 
for approval. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
recommending that the civil service commis- 
sion be requested to certify from Lhe eligible 
lists of appointment in this department one 
captain and one b.ut etiant. Recommended 
for approval. 

Communication from Milton Meyer, making 
application for fire badge when allotments 
an made for ensuing ye: r. Recommend thai 
communication be addressed to him to renew 



his application about the 1st of July, 

Communication irom the civil service com- 
mission, certifying three eligibles from those 
standing highest on the list of eligible lieu- 
tenants for promotion in this department. 
Recommended that John Arata (19.2) of 2863 
Twenty-third street, the highest on the list, 
be appointed. 

Communication from the Board of Police 
Commissioners, in response to ours of the8lh 
in regard to having an order issued making 
it a ground for revocation of license for any 
liquor dealer to sell spiritous liquor to any 
member of the fire department in uniform, 
advising that same will be given immediate 
attention. Recommend that it be referred to 
secretary to report progress. 

Communication from the Twin Peaks Im- 
provement Club, inquiring about the new 
house to be built for engine company 24. Re- 
commend that secretary be directed to reply. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
recommending that the following quantity 
and size of ho.se be purchased for use in this 
department: 10*000 feet of 2f -inch, 5,000feet 
of 3£-inch and 5,000 feet of 14 inch. Recom- 
mend that secretary be directed to advertise 
for bids for this quantity and size of hose. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
reporting that connection had been made by 
the Spring Valley Water Company from their 
4-inch main to cittern, located at Forty- 
seventh avenue and J street, and recommend- 
ing that letter of thanks be addressed to said 
Spring Valley Water Company. Recom- 
mended for approval. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
reporting that engine company 45 went into 
service at 8 a. m. April 16th in the quarters 
formerly occupied by chemical company 12 on 
Forty-fifth avenue between H and I streets. 
Sunset District; chemical company 12 g"iny, 
out of service on that date until further 
notice. Filed 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
submitting report of Battalion Chief Cook 
relative to an accident he had in responding 
to box 351 April 12th. when his horse threw a 
shoe through I he window of a'barher shop at 
603 Front street, causing a small piece of 
glass to cut the forehead of the barber, 1'. 
Lena, very slightly. Filed. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
recommending i hat Joseph Allen be allowed 
to change his position from hoseman engine !' 
to stoker engine 9. Recommended lor ap- 
proval. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
recommending that a communication I"- ad 
dressed to the board of public worl 
ing that a cist, rn be constructed at the inter- 
section "i l!i\ View avenue ami Newhall 
si reel . Recommeiidi d for approvu I 

Com rnu ideal ion Prom local inspector* of 
steamboats (copj of letu-i iMi . . .. i . Pilol 

John Ferem i in regard to irb t of 

the grounding of the I \n\ Id Si mm I Marcl 
li,' laiing i hai after care! ul cons irii pal ion 
I hey are ol t he opinion that I m 

blame and exonerating Pilot John Fen m, 

Filed. 



Communication from the Sutro Heights 
Improvement Club, asking for hydrants to 
be connected with 10-inch main now being in- 
stalled along Thirty-ninth avenue by the 
Spring Valley Water Company. Recommend 
that it be referred to the chief engineer. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
recommending that fire alarm boxes Nos. 722 
and 724 be installed at Fifth avenue and Par- 
nassus street and Hugo and Arguello boule- 
vard," respectively. Recommended for ap- 
proval. 

Communication from the civil service com- 
mission, certifying three eligibles of those 
standing highest, on the list of eligible cap- 
tains for promotion in this department. It 
is recommended that George Hartman (64) 
of 676 Howard street be appointed to the po- 
sition, he standing highest on the eligible list. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
reporting that Lieutenant Mulloy of relief 
company 1 has been reassigned to duty as 
lieutenant of engine company 7. Recom- 
mended for approval. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
recommending that the board of public works 
be requested to construct afire cistern at the 
intersection of Vienna and Avalon streets. 
Recommended for approval, 

Harry J. Moore and Mr. Chase of Kohler& 
Chase, appeared to request the removal of 
truck 1 from its present location to the new 
house to be erected on Mint avenue, their 
reasons being: The present site is too valua- 
ble; the location is bad for a truck in respond- 
ing to alarms; the truck is of no service in 
the neighborhood and ladies oui shopping are 
afraid to pass on that side of i In- street. 
They were referred to the Board oi Super- 
visors. 

Representatives of the different manufac- 
turers of automobile fire apparatus discussed 
the specifications on which bids were opened 
recently, until after 11 o'clock, and the mat- 
ter was laid over until Fridaj evening al i 

Driver Walti r S. sman of engii e 9 is quite 
a genius in his own peculiar way. He has 

latelj mv.ni ed in rivance, .-« methinp after 

i In- old fashioned grindstone, with a large 
spool, whereby severs can be 

wound in a few minutes. With the aid of 
this machine the boys are in position to turn 
• an more sha ihree housi i ihe 

deparl mi nt. S< .man i- firsi oui for vacation 
and says he it 1 

if some kind friend will only furnish the 
"dough, "cral ibing," 

at whicl i he is an es 

If we please others, v hy not \ I U? 
O'Connor, the Klorlst, 2756 Mission street. 
Phone Mission 5988 

Cap! II Smith, a pel ioner rf tl 
menl . foi merl; ru k c mi i nj I. 

paid i to i ffice h pleassnl call in- ■ 
Capta in Smi h will : i . i . ■ an ex t emu i 
liun, visilii i ■ i\ es, when he will pul 
in a nrnni h, after w hii h hi n the 

Sou! hern count ry. 

e 37 and Tru< kman 
r*om Reilly of ti ur lo 

fuse in i i 1 1 

■ ibile one i n the 

captain' 

ported thai R himcell hea> ih h 

rtinn Phi boys hope his « ite 

WOll'l have to collect it. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 

JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boijuets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 
Special attention given to Wedding and funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decoration* and Designs. 

Gardening, Etc. 
TELEPHONE MISSION ISS3 

To Reach Nurseries, take Castro street car to 23rd. or 

Mission. 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 
_^ to Douglass and 24th streets. 

Phone Home J 2549 

BMIL, SCHOEN BEIN 

Fireman Cap Maker 

Formerly of 21st and Folsom 
. . . WILLIAMS . : BUILDING. . . 

THIRD STREET 

Cor. Mission. Room 307 SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone 
Home C 2458 



Lamanet Bros. 

Is ihe place of all places to gel the very latest and best in the way of 

Firemen's Regulation Shirts, 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

Bats and Underwear, Etc. 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



WM. F. EIGAN 

M. R. C. V. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D 

1155 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 
Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco, Cal. 

M. 1_ MILCOVICH. Prop. 

Martin's Restaurant and Grill 



THE 

PACIFICFIREMAN 

JOB DEPARTMENT 

IS NOW PREPARED TO PRINT 
LETTER HEADS 
BILL HEADS 
INVOICES 
STATEMENTS 
ENVELOPES 
BUSINESS CARDS 
WEDDING INVITATIONS 
DANCE PROGRAMS 
PERSONAL CARDS 
SHIPPING TAGS 
BILLS OF FARE, ETC 

479 TURK STREET 

Phone FRANKLIN 6867 



1533 STE1NER STREET 



San Francisco 



Telephone Douglas 287 1 



Telephone Douglas 1235 

U. J. BORCK, ■ HE TAILOR 

MAKES A SPECIALTY OF 

FIREMEN'S '. ' UINIRORIV1S 

ALSO FI.XF CIVILIAN SUITS 



WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 



WARRANT BROKERS 



93 EDDY STREET 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



Tin- telephone operators In New York City 
handle 1.80,000 '-..lis every rush hour. Thev will 

1 """.■. i ; wiiii ,i.n\ oue ••.' 500,1 subscribers 

in half ;i minute. 

Ask the exchange manager how lie can handle 
all these 'ills, :in«i he will toll you tersely. "By 
saving the seeomls." 

"Schedule time" is ihe keynote of American 

industry. That means Howard time. Thi 
always somebody hlghei up holding a Howard 
on the i"t> -demanding the Howard type 
of accuracj ami punctuality 

The Howard is tin- .me watch in the World 

wholly adapted '" lern progress. It has 

in.' precise construction and the scientific ad- 
justment. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
r ii 

The price oi each watch— from tiie 17-jewel 
(double roller) in a Crescent Extra or .las. Boss 
Extra gold -filled case at $40, to the 2S-jewel at 
J150, and the Edward Howard model at $3:.o— 
is fixed at tin- Factors and a printed ticket at- 
tached. 

Find the Howard jeweler in yuur town and 

talk i<> him Not every Jeweler can sell you a 

Howard. The jeweler who can is a g 1 man 

to know. 

Admiral Slgsbee has written a little I k, 

"The Log "t ili' j Howard Watch," giving the 
record "i Lis own Howard in the 1" S Navy. 

you'll enjoy It Drop us a post-card, i>e[>t, ,\\ 

and we'll send v.iii a COpy. 

HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston. Mass 

T. H. KILGO 

DIA.MOINDS AND Jr-WELRY 

I 71 WALLER ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 

SALVAR 

( I Will Save ) 

The Greatest BLOOD REMEDY in the World 

WILL CURE- — 

RHEUMATISM 

Acute or Chronic 

BLOOD POISON 

Acquired or Hereditary 



PARALYSIS 
CATARRH 

MALARIA 



San Francisco 



Diseases of Liver, Kidneys and Bladder 



Diseases Peculiar to Women 



Phone Kearny 3523 



630 KEARNY STREET 

COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue, Oakland 



JOE. H. ROSENBERG 
<£iml anil iflilitarji JEailnr 

73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 

Louis Fran limbers, formerly with Rownblum 6< Abraham. Marag-r 



h«c 1780 $10.00 FOR 40 TO 60 DAYS' TREATMENT 

Call or Write for our 100 Page Booklet 



Home phone S 23 1 7 

The Little Emporium 

L. RIZNIC Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 
2206-98 GEARY STREET 

Near Broderick 
Telephone Weil 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 



TO T HE P UBLIC 

In offering Salvar to the public, we do so 
with perfect confidence, and state publicly our 
willingness to have our remedy thoroughly tested 
in any fair and equitable manner, in the treat- 
ment of all diseases we claim it will relieve, and 
we will abide by a decision so given and dis- 
continue its sale at once if it is found different in 
any particular from what it is represented to be. 

SEITZ & MILLS. Agents 
1402 Market St., near 10th, San Francisco 




VOL. IX. -NO. 18 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, MAY 4, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Deadlock in the Fire Board. 



In its issue of Tuesday the Chronicle 
had the following to say of the dead- 
lock among the members of the Fire 
Commission at its meeting last Mon- 
day night: 

Adversity in the Fire Commission 
reached an acute stage last night when, 
after two hours' fruitless effort to 
break a deadlock among the members, 
President Brandenstein vehemently 
denounced the actions of his collea- 
gues as grossly incompetent and ridi- 
culous. 

He was followed by Chief Engi- 
neer Murphy, who hotly declared 
that the members of the fire corps 
were upset in their discipline and 
the efficiency of the department was 
so greatly impaired that he would 
not be responsible for happenings 
that were imminent under the pres- 
ent regime. 

"Allowing drunken and incompetent 
men to serve in the department and 
not appointing a superintendent of 
engines." declared the chief, "will 
result in things over which I have no 
control. It's as bad now as a year 
ago. when the commission tolerated 
firemen beating up their superior 
officers." 

The expressions of the president of 
the Board and the fire chief were 
made :is a result, df numerous passion- 
ate outbursts by Commissioners Dono- 
hoe and Dillon, who were at logger- 
heads with Brandenstein and Pfaoffle 
over the removal of George Gihlin, 
accused of absenting himself from 
duty wit him t leave of absence and the 
failure in ratify Samuel Birmingham 



as superintendent of engines. 

"I presume this is a matter for the 
Mayor and the Board of Supervisors 
to pass upon. We are doing nothing 
for the advancement of the depart- 
ment, " concluded Brandenstein. Com- 
missioner Dillon retorted that he could 
not see where the commission was of 
any use if Chief Murphy was to be 
permitted the right to carry any au- 
thority. This brought forth another 
speech by Murphy. 

"We cannot expect the men to heed 
their superiors as long as certain com- 
missioners tell the firemen they should 
pay no attention to their chief and 
that they would fix things for the men 
brought before the Board for infrac- 
tions," he said. 

As a result of the deadlock in the 
voting, Commissioners Dillion and 
Donohoe saved Giblin from suspen- 
sion, despite the fact that he has been 
under charges seven times in the last 
two years. Three battalion chiefs 
and Assistant Chief McCluskey testi- 
fied to his incompetency and drunken 
habits. 

Though not indorsing the appoint- 
ment of Samuel Berniingham. the 
corporation yards, which entail a cost 
of $200 daily to the city, will be with- 
out an oveiseer. In the event of a 
big lire, according to Chief Murphy, 
the department equipment without 
Bermingham would be wholly inade 
quate. 

In defense of their action, Dillon 
and Donohoe slated that, pending the 
decision of Judge Seauell. they will 

not affirm Bermingham to the position 
formerly held by Win. Gleason, who 
claims he was illegally suspended. 



Workmen Provided for the High Pressure 
System. 

At Monday's meeting of the Board 
of Supervisors a resolution was adopted 
by the Board which provides work- 
men for the fire system. The high 
pressure water mains and pumping 
station will be ready May 14. The 
supervisors agree that new employes 
are to be in charge of it. 

The resolution adopted Monday pro- 
vides for employes at the Second and 
Townsend streets pumping station, 
which is designated Pumping Station 
No. 1. There is to be a chief engi- 
neer, at $175 a month; a first assistant 
engineer, at $150; a second assistant 
engineer, at $125; three firemen, at 
$100 each; a foreman gateman, at 
$125. and three gatemen, at $100. 

Mayor Rolph, in speaking of the re- 
solution, said: 

"This matter came up at a confer- 
ence in my office several days ago. 
The fire protection system will soon 
be ready, and, to put in operation, the 
employment of these men is necessary. 
There is a question whether the opera- 
tion of this system should be under 
the fire department or the board of 
public works. That question may be 
settled when the budget is made up. 
Now the tire department has a fund 
from which these men may be paid. 
The portion of the high pressure tire 
protection system that is ready will be 
in oi eration by May 12th or 1 1th. " 

The resolution adopting the recom- 
mendation el' the mayor was adopted. 
and the ordinance that will create the 

new offices, which will be reallj tem- 
porarj ones, will be passed to print at 
the i ext meeting oi the Board of 

Supervisors. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Owed 30 Cents-Fired. 

At the previous meeting of the West 
Hoboken, N. J., town council, Empire 
fire company reported that one of its 
members, John McKay, had been ex- 
pelled for non-payment of dues. Such 
expulsions are subject to the approval 
of the council, and as a result of an 
investigation made by Councilman 
Bollinger, the fireman will be rein- 
stated. Bollinger is chairman of the 
committee on fire and water. When 
the report was made at the previous 
meeting he asked to be permitted to 
investigate, and this course was taken. 
At the last meeting Bollinger said he 
had looked into the matter and was 
convinced that McKay should not be 
fired from the company. He declared 
that McKay had been only thirty cents 
in arrears of dues, and that on this 
technicality he had been dropped from 
the organization. An order was issued 
that McKay be reinstated. 

Cold Blooded Man. 

"Man is the coldest blooded animal 
there is," said a well known doctor. 
"Man's low temperature," the doctor 
went on, "is responsible for more than 
half his ailments. Your normal tem- 
perature is 98i degrees F. It is only 
when you have a bad temperature that 
you get as warm as any of the lower 
animals— that is to say, when you are 
in a high fever, with a temperature of 
102, you are at the normal heat of the 
cat, the dog, the ox, the rat, and so on. 
In the coolest of seas the porpoise is 
never cooler than 100 degrees. The 
bat, the rabbit, the guinea pig, the 
hare and the elephant likewise are all 
cool at 100 degrees. The hen has the 
highest temperature of all the lower 
creatures, and it is a good deal warmer, 
too, when a chicken. Its temperature 
then is as high as 111, but age and ex- 
perience cool its blood by 3 degrees." 



An Interrupted Duel. 

A fire engine was recently the means 
of putting a sudden stop to a duel in 
Germany. Two physicians quarreled 
and arranged for a meeting with pis- 
tols. The village chief magistrate 
heard of the proposed duel. He in- 
formed the firemen, and together, 
drawing a machine, they proceeded to 
the scene of the encounter. Just as 



the seconds had stepped off the dis- 
tance a heavy stream of water struck 
one of the physicians, and a moment 
later the second doctor was also 
drenched to the skin. The would-be 
fighters, in their dripping clothes, 
looked so ridiculous, that they both 
burst out laughing, shook hands and 
returned to their homes, thanking the 
ingenious mayor for his intervention. 

From the Underwriters' Report of 
last week we clip the following: "In 
accordance with the desire expressed 
by a committee of downtown business 
men, the Fire Commission of San 
Francisco has approved the plan to 
move hook and ladder No. 1 from its 
present location on O'Farrell. near 
Market street, to Mint avenue, near 
Mission. The reason for this action, 
it is stated, is that the O'Farrell street 
station is considered to be too valuable 
a piece of property to be utilized as a 
fire station." 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Victor Victrolas 

Columbia Grafonolas 



Victor and Columbia Records 

Inventigate Our New Club Plan 

KOHLER & CHASE 

26 O'HARREEL STREET 



13th ANNUAL PICNIC op the 



Veteran Firemen's Association 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

at Fairfax Park, Marin Co., Cal. 
SUIN'DA V, MAY S, 1Q13 



Boats leave Sausalito Ferry, foot of Mai let Street, every 
half hour from 8 a. m. to t> p. ro. 



Rank 

211 

212 

213 

214 
215 
216 
217 
218 
219 
220 
221 
222 
223 
224 
225 
226 
227 
228 
229 
230 
231 
232 
233 
234 
235 
I 236 
'237 
238 
239 
240 
241 
I 242 
243 
244 
245 
I 246 
I 247 
248 
|249 
250 
251 
252 
253 
254 
255 
256 
257 
258 
259 
260 
261 
262 
263 
264 
265 
266 
267 
268 
269 
270 
271 
272 
273 
274 
275 
276 
277 



Eligible List of Firemen. 

PART TWO-Continued. 

Name PercenUae 

Edward Rowland 83 32 

William P. Porter 83.31 

Samuel Nathan 83 27 

Frederick A. Stoermer 83.12 

James M. Rawlins 83.12 

George M. Voisin 83.12 

George Lewis 83 .05 

John J. Hartford, Jr 83.02 

Daniel Carroll 9301 

William J. Dougherty 83 CO 

Charles T. Collins 82.99 

James J Farrell 82.97 

William Thompson 82.97 

George E. Lucy 82.95 

Grover O Delmas 82.90 

John J. Sheehan 82.85 

Henry S. Lavaroni 82.82 

Patrick Cornyn 82.72 

Jeremiah Mahoney 82 72 

Andrew Brizzolara 82.72 

Edward P. Burke 82.70 

Giles W. Dunn 82 67 

George J. Shaughnessv 82 65 

John McVey 82 62 

Chris Salis 82.62 

Francis J. Cameron 82 60 

Charles F. A. Crowley 82.56 

Harry A. Higgins 82.55 

William M Bennett 82 55 

Matthew A. Kerwin 82.52 

John C. Murphy 82.49 

Cornelius Horgan 82.37 

Thomas O. Thomasen 82.32 

Odin Hoy 82 31 

James McCarthy 82 30 

John Olof W. Larson 82 27 

Leland S. Rogers 82.25 

Carl B. Speckman 82 20 

Charles M. Merillion 82.20 

John J. Silk 82.17 

Harry McFarland 82.12 

James Barden 82 C8 

Herbert L. Selleck 82.01 

Charles P. Goessel 81.97 

William Koser 81 95 

Gustaw A. Anderson 81.90 

Thomas J Delehantv 81.67 

David Murphy 81.83 

William A. Bagala 81 75 

Daniel A Pallas 81.72 

Charles W. Gray 81.70 

Denis Flaherty 8i.67 

Frank A. McGinney 81 67 

William E. Gnagey 8160 

Albert V. Jorgensen 81 55 

Milton B. Schreiber 81.55 

David Lincbner 81 36 

Edward F. Foley 81.25 

John Sonesson 81.22 

Harry A.Wolff 81 20 

John Sullivan 81.20 

Thomas H. Moore 81.19 

Michael C.Roche 81.12 

James F. Campbell 81.12 

Grover T.Lane 81.12 

Peter Ackenhiel 81.07 

Louis P. Dematei 81 CO 

Continued on page 5. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

By courtesy of Mits Blanche Walsh 
the Alcazar management is enabled to 
announce that one of the most suc- 
cessful starring vehicles, "The Woman 
in the Case," will be given its first 
presentation in San Francisco next 
Monday evening and throughout the 
week at the O'Farrell-street theatre, 
with Florence Stone in the role origi- 
nated by Miss Walsh and played by her 
for two years, one of them on Broad- 
way, In addition to exercising her 
influence to obtain the play fcr Belasco 
& Mayer's use, Miss Walsh has gener- 
ously attended rehearsals and supplied 
Stage Director Butler with many de- 
tails of production which the manu- 
script does not furnish, so a complete 
performance is assured. "The Woman 
in the Case" was written by the late 
Clyde Fitch, and is a fair example of 
that prolific dramatist's keen knowl- 
edge of varied femininity. 

Empress Theatre. 

Beginning with the matinee Sunday 
afternoon the Empress will offer the 
side-splitting English comedy "A 
Night in An English Music Hall," 
which convulsed thousands on its last 
appearance at the local house. From 
the Palace Theatre, London, comes 
the Royal Sannetto troupe, the lightn- 
ing juggling marvels. This is the 
first American visit of these jugglers. 
Selma Walters, beautiful of face and 
figure, who will be remembered as 
having scored heavily with "Seven 
Days." Wright Lorimer, in "The 
Shepard King." will present "A 
Woman's Way." J. Hunter Wilson 
and Eflie Pearson, who were co-stars 
in that popular musical comedy, "The 
Three Twins," have forsaken musical 
comedy for a brief tour of the S. & C. 
circuit, presenting songs, dances arid 
repartee. Miss Rae Eleanor Ball, she 
of the remarkable and classic Grecian 
profile, is endowed doubly by nature. 
Miss P,all is a violin virtuoso of un- 
usual ability. Mr and Mrs. Sydney 
Reynolds have some polite patter and 
handle merriment in a good-natured 
manner, that will make them one of 
the bright spots of the bill. Wright, 
Lewis and McWilliams. acrobats, and 
the motion pictures complete the bill. 

The Pacific Fikkman $2.00 a year. 



FOR BETTER FIRE PROTECTION 
in the: village: 

A SEAGRAVE 2-WHEEL HAND-DRAWN CHEMICAL 




GORHAM FIRE APPARATUS CO. 



SEATTLE 

2)6 Jackson Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Street 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 S. Olive Street 



American Rubber Mfg. Co. 

9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories — Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 

WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 

Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose, Brass 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Depart mint Supplies 

When You're Buyin' Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

L. H. &. B. I. BILL 

Sole Distributors for the Pcclflc Const 543 (ioldcn (kite Ave., Sun FrUCiacO 





PACIFIC KIKEMAN 



P 



'ACIFI 




IRENAN 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

By 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G, PRES TO N Business Manager 

Editorial Rooms and Business Office, 479 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 



Entered as second-class matter March 21. 1908. at the 
Postodice at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 



SATURDAY MAY 4. 1912 



San Francisco Fire Commissioners 

REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE. 

San Francisco, May 2, 1912. 

To the Honorable. Boird of Fire Commissioners. 

Gentlemen: Your Administrative Commit- 
tee respectfully submits the following report 
on matters that have come before it for con- 
sideration since the last regular meeting of 
the Board, together with its recommendations 
for action thereon, as follows: 

Communication from Battalion Chief M. J. 
Farley from Monrovia, Cal., as to his health, 
etc. Recommend that it be referred to the 
secretary to answer. 

Communication from Eugene F. Moran, 
truckman truck 3, making application for 
leave of absence for two months, without 
pay, beginning May 1, with permission to 
visit points in the East for the benefit of his 
health. Recommended for approval. 

Communication from A. P. Hanson, mak- 
ing application for position as pilot on fire- 
boat when vacancy occurs. Filed. 

Communication from William Loughran, 
substitute engine 6, making application for 
salary during disability caused by spraining 
ankle while on duty March 28. 1912. Recom- 
mended for approval. 

Communication from the Richmond Federa- 
tion of Improvement Clubs petitioning for 
fire hydrants at Geary street and Seventeenth 
avenue, Geary street and Fortieth avenue, 
Clement street and Fourteenth avenue and 
Clement street and Twenty-seventh avenue. 
Recommended for approval on recommenda- 
tion of chief. 

Communication from the Richmond Federa- 
tion of Improvement Clubs petitioning for 
modern glass door fire alarm boxes in their 
districts; also requesting box be installed at 
the corner of Nineteenth avenue and Fulton 
street. Recommeno that it be referred to 
the chief engineer. 

Communication from the Civil Service Com- 
mission, notifying us that Albert H. Speigel. 
eligible hydrantman No. 5 has asked permis- 
sion to waive certification and has been re- 
fused; also that Thomas F. McLaughlin, eli- 
gible hydrantman No. 1, has been permitted 
to waive appointment to April 29 in order to 
investigate his standing as a civil service 
brass finisher. Filed. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
recommending that fire alarm box No. 776 be 
installed at its charter location, Thirtieth and 



Clement street. Recommended for approval. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
submitting report of Battalion Chief James 
Layden and recommending that a large iron 
stairway be erected immediately on theMoul- 
ton street side of the Yerba Buena school 
building. Recommended for approval. 

Communication from Harry Carter, hose- 
man fireboat 1, making application for leave 
of absence for fifteen days from May 1 to 
May 16 in order to enable him to visit rela- 
tives. Recommended for approval. 

Communication from the Board of Public 
Works, requesting this department to install 
a fire alarm system and telephone in pumping 
station No. 1, Second and Townsend streets. 
Recommended to be referred to the chief en- 
gineer. 

Communication from the Civil Service ( !om- 
mission authorizing temporary appointments 
to positions in this department for the month 
of May. Filed. 

Communication from the Civil Service Com- 
mission, authorizing the appointment of a 
superintendent of engines for thirty days 
from May 1, in conformity with the order of 
Judge Seawell. Filed. 

Communication from the superintendent of 
engines, reporting men off duty at the corpo- 
ration yard for the month of April. Filed. 

Communication from H. A. Oser et al., pe- 
titioning this Board to appoint E. E. Bullene 
engineer on one of the fireboats. Filed. 

Communication from the Gorham Fire Ap- 
paratus Co., stating that the chemical engine 
ordered from them on Sept. 20th is now rcf.dy 
for its official test. Recommend it be re- 
ferred to the chief engineer. 

Communication from Wm. J. Conroy, lieu- 
tenant truck 8. making application for leave 
of absence for fifteen days, beginning May 1, 
1912, on account of sickness. Recommended 
for approval. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
recommending that fire alarm boxes be in- 
stalled as follows: Box 227 at the corner of 
Page and Steiner streets; box 781 at Eigh- 
teenth avenue and Fulton street. Recom- 
mended for approval. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
reporting that water tower 2 will go into ser- 
vice on May 1, 1912, with the following com- 
plement of men: Captain, George Hartman; 
lieutenant, John Arata; driver H. P. Baden, 
and hoseman, J. A. Altamirano, at the quar- 
ters of engine 6 on Seventh street. Recom- 
mended for approval. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
reporting the following assignments to take 
effect May 1. 1912: Percy Creede, as lieu- 
tenant truck 1; Charles Claveau, as operator 
battalion chief district 13; E. Murphy, from 
operator to hoseman engine 26, and James 
Taylor, from host-man engine 41 to operator 
First Assistant Engineer Dolan in place of 
John Arata, promoted. Recommended for 
approval. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Matter of imposing penalty on George E. 
Giblin, hoseman engine 21, for absenting him- 
self from dutv without permission on March 
29 and 30, 1912. Put over. 



Resolution temporarily appointing Samuel 
Bermingham as superintendent of engines. 
Put over. 

Resolution requesting the Civil Service 
Commission to certify the names of sixty 
■ Hun. Its for appointment in this department 
from the civil service list of firemen. 

In connection with the above the following 
resolution was adopted: 

Resolved, That the Civil Service Commis- 
sion be aid it is hereby requested to certify 
eligibles trom the Civil Service list of firemen 
for this department. For your guidance in 
your certification, we indicate to you our re- 
quirements in the following particulars, to- 
wit: We need from the list of firemen, 12 
men of seafaring capacity and experience for 
assignment to duty on the fireboats; 12 driv- 
ers of motor-driven apparatus, 10 teamsters, 
12 truckmen and 14 hosemen. 

Commissioner Dillon moved that the mat- 
ter of appointing Samuel Bermingham Su- 
perintendent of engines be laid over until a 
written report from Judge Seawell was re- 
ceived. Approved. 



Raymond Remy of truck 2 is certainly the 
hero of the hour, for rescuing an Italian 
named Salvadore de Martini, a guest of the 
Hotel La Rio Jana early Thursday morning, 
who unable to escape, rushed to a third- 
Btory window and was about to jump to the 
street when he was halted by Remy shouting 
to him to wait. The ladder fell short of the 
window but Remy climbed to an adjoining 
building in the course of construction and ran 
a plank across to the window and carried his 
burden to a place of safety. Many women 
and children were also rescued by firemen. 



Its proverbial that newspaper men are al- 
ways "broke." In presenting a bill for$2.00 
to Captain Welch of engine 7 last Tuesday, 
to our astonishment he presented us with 
$3.00. It is not to be assumed he will always 
remain in that frame of mind, as no man 
fording a swift running stream can dip his 
foot into the same water, so we advise our 
friends not to try it on, as he may kick over 
the traces if pushed to the limit. 

Captain O'Farrell of chemical 9, accompa- 
nied bv his wife, will tour Southern Califor- 
nia during his vacation, taking in Los Angeles, 
i San Diego and other towns. Both of them 
have only recently recovered from a long 
seige of illness. It is the earnest wish of the 
writer that they both may enjoy their coming 
outing and return with renewed health. 

If we please others, why not you? 
O'Connor, the Florist, 2756 Mission street. 
Phone Mission 5988. 



Battalion Chief Cook, with a few select 
friends (not firemen), started last Tuesday 
for Maraga Valley on a hunting trip, with a 
complete arsenal of guns and a wagon load 
of good things for the inner man. 

Captain Lawson of engine 6 has broke up 
housekeeping and moved his family to San 
Anselmo, where he expects a change of 
climate will aid his son in recovering his 
health, who has been under the doctor's care 
for some time. The captain will spend his 
vacation there also. 



Harry Hock called at this office this week. 



Telephone Douglas 1255 

L. J. BORCK, L HE TAILOR 

MAKES A SPECIALTY OF 

FIREMEN'S \ ' UNIFORMS 

ALSO FINE CIVILIAN SUITS 
93 EDDY STREET San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



(Eligible List Continued.) 

Rank Name Percentage 

278 Thomas J. Rodden 80.98 

279 Harold C. Wedge 80.97 

280 John J. Donohue 80.96 

281 Henry J. Mclson 80.95 

282 Bernard J. Werner 80.92 

283 John P. Haley 80.85 

284 Frederick N. Armstrong 80.82 

285 Ralph Dehor? 80.80 

286 William H. Morrison 60.72 

287 Victor J. Pott 80.72 

288 Denis J. Connelly 80.72 

289 Edward Logue 80.70 

290 William E. Redmond 80.70 

291 Daniel 0. Riordan 80.60 

292 John W. Hart 80.60 

293 Thomas J. Charlton 80.57 

294 Paul S. Cuneo 80 56 

295 George Wilton 80.55 

296 Philip Wessa 80.50 

297 George Greggains 80.40 

298 John O. Knight 80 39 

299 Edmund L. Calvin 80.37 

300 Leo B. Drew 80.37 

301 Walter A. Stanton 80.30 

302 Albert St. Clair Morrison 80.30 

303 William E. Armstrong 80.30 

304 John B. O'Brien 80 29 

305 David J. Toomey 80.29 

306 James C. Ansley 80.27 

307 Frank W. Theobald 80.27 

308 John J. Quigley 80.22 

309 William S. Koran 80.21 

310 John C. Hamby .80.02 

311 George Peterson 80.02 

312 James H. Foye 80.00 

313 John Rose.... 79.99 

314 Angel F. B. Soto 79.90 

315 Cornelius D. Riordan 79.90 

316 Alfred J. Neill 79.87 

317 Frederick A. Senk 79.86 

318 Florence J. Mahoney 79.84 

319 Michael J. Kennedy.. 79.80 

320 Frederick Skuse 79.75 

321 Rudolph F. Rohde 79.70 

322 Edward V. Smith 79.66 

323 Terence Fox 79.65 

324 Thomas Gordon 79 62 

325 Allen M Gaston 79.62 

326 Anton Logar 79.61 

327 Michael O'Connor 79.56 

328 William J. Cooper ....79.50 

329 James L Lewis 79 45 

330 Janus Riordan 79.45 

331 Patrick .1 Moran 79.40 

332 Ignatius T, Connors 79.40 

333 Edgar I Long 79.39 

334 Clarence Dougherty 79.32 

335 Ward II All ...79 26 

336 A < I i I i 1 1 De Maria 79.20 

337 Harry 1) Gibha ... 79,20 

338 EJwm II Hall ,<) I 

339 Charles Jackowski 79 07 

340 Carl P Valentine 79,07 

)4I Peter Farrell 79 05 

*42 Patrick McLoughlin 78 90 

343 Cornelias Shea 7h 90 

344 Charles F Stein 78.87 

345 John Koster 78.85 

146 He'nfj II Ludolph ....78.82 



(Eligible List Continued.) 

Rank Name Percenlaae 

347 Frank F.Finn 78.81 

348 Patrick A. Sullivan 78.75 

349 Wiiliam J. Flynn 78.70 

350 Henry A. Wobber 78.69 

351 Joseph Walley 78,65 

352 Owen Williams 78.62 

353 Michael Lynch 78.62 

354 Patrick J. Slane 78.59 

355 William H. Ashton 78.55 

356 Bertrand A. Medus 78.45 

357 Philip H. Harney 78.28 

358 Bernard J. Hagan 78.17 

359 Henry G. Byrnes 78.12 

360 Walter P. Barnes 78.10 

361 Clarence R. Cane 78.07 

362 Charles D. Kyne 77.95 

363 William J. Patton 77.95 

364 David R. Doherty 77.88 

365 John H. Barnett 77.86 

366 Henry C. Kolby 77.82 

367 John Gilrov 77.57 

368 John J. Carberry 77.50 

369 Emile J. Del Monte 77.47 

370 Gerald D. Collins 77.45 

371 Thomas J. Shaughnessy 77.42 

372 James E. Mulreany 77.40 

373 Joseph Sullivan 77.37 

374 Daniel A. Drew 77.32 

375 John J. Desmond 77.32 

376 George C. Sandersfeld 77.27 

377 Michael Darcey 77.24 

378 William J. Loughran 77 20 

379 William R. Casey 77.15 

380 Edrnond Sheedy 77.09 

381 Jesse J. Rose 76.97 

382 William Siemon 76.95 

383 Cornelius A. Flynn 76.95 

384 John Harrison 76.92 

385 Albert Warren 76.77 

386 James J. Norton 76 76 

387 Frank Reynolds 76.65 

388 Frank L. Bell 76 55 

389 Anthony Canepa 76.45 

390 Archie Ney 76.40 

391 Thomas M. King 76 27 

392 Walter J. Lally 76.26 

393 Philip J. Kennedy 76.19 

394 Chester G. Martin 76.16 

395 John J. Chambers 76.12 

396 Frank G. Strubel 75.97 

397 Raymond S. Swain 75.90 

398 William L. Kearna 75.90 

399 Frank J. Trudell 75.87 

400 Charles A. Erickson 75.82 

401 Max A Skierka 75 70 

402 Dennis O'Connell 75 67 

403 Louis .1. Sydow 75.67 

404 George !•'. Seibert 75.65 

405 James T. Reilly 75.61 

406 Thomas Fayne 75.52 

407 Tobias Bluitl 75 43 

408 Vincent J. Stephens 75 42 

409 William .1. Reea 75 42 

410 Jamea O'Malley 75 20 

411 Albert A. Brawn 75.15 

412 Patrick Cushman 75 12 

413 George I Collins 75 06 

( taptain Bow 1 1 engine 16 and ] 

Hewitt of engine 2.'! were cullers al tins ofl ce 
during 1 In- v\ eek 



Around the Bay. 

The bond issue to replace the horse-drawn 
fire apparatus with motor-driven apparatus 
failed to meet with the approval of the citi- 
zens of Alameda, and did not carry by the 
two-thirds majority required under the char- 
ter, the vote being 2499 for the purchase of 
the motor-driven apparatus and 1392 against. 
The issue to spend $8,000 to improve the fire 
alarm system carried by a vote of 2661 for 
the improvement and 1237 against. The pres- 
ent auto pumping engine the department 
owns, and has also cut down expenses, but 
the voters seem to think that $42,000 was too 
much to spend in modernizing the depart- 
ment. 

C. F. Martin, physical instructor at the 
Oakland Young Men's Christian Association, 
has been appointed chief physical examiner 
for the civil service board. Martin will ex- 
amine the candidates who are to take the 
examinations for vacancies left in the police 
and fire departments. He will also superin- 
tend the installation of proper exercising ap- 
pliances so that the men may keep in shape. 

An approi riation of $18,000 for the building 
of three new fire houses in Oakland was given 
its first reading a few days ago and will be 
acted upon later. One will be erected in 
Allendale, one on Montgomery street arid one 
at College and Claremont avenues. No segre- 
gation of the amounts to be used in each in- 
stance is made. An ordinance recommend- 
ing the extension of the auxiliary high pres- 
sure fire system along Fourteenth sireet, 
from Washington to Market, was also in- 
troduced. 

The new Seagrave combination chemical 
engines for the Richmond and Palo Alto fire 
departments have arrived and are at theGor- 
ham Company's plant at the present time. 
These engines will be given their official test 
in the course of the next few days, and they 
will then be turned over to their respective 
departments. Richmond will soon vote on 
the issuance of $50,000 bonds to purchase 
further apparatus, and the people demand 
that tire protection be one of the first im- 
provements. 

William Rhodes, driver for engine 3 of the 
Alameda fire department, whose foot was 
badly crushed about a month ago. has re- 
turned tO work again. 

An Inspiring Scene. 

Last Wednesday afternoon, while talking 
to a friend ai tin- corner "I Mai kel anil Crant 
avenue, the lire signal bells began ringing, 
traffic stopped in the street, a dense croud 
gathered on the corner, and in about a mi nine 
track 1 with its greal big 9 horse hitch < 
tearing oul of quarters, down Market sti 
with Cunningham handling the ribboi 
Captain Ellenberg looking straight ahead 
seated beside him, and Ed Lamb at the steal- 
ing gear of the big' truck, ""h dear," said 
a fad} w lm was sts ol of 

th-' writer to her gentleman escort, "ihi dar- 
ing Bud in tar regard of 1 
men makes mj heart come up in my throat; 
ii is mqre re alistlc than anj mo> Ii 
I've ever witnessed. " 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and DtnfflU, 

Gardening, Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Reach Nurseries, take Castro street car to 23rd. or 

Mission, 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



Phone Home J 2549 

BMIL SCHOBNBEIN 

Fireman Cap Maker 

Formerly of 21st and Folsom 
... WILLIAMS.-. BUILDING... 

THIRD STREET 

Cor. Mission, Room 307 SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone 
Home C 2458 



Lamanet Bros. 

Is the place of all places 1o get the very latest and best in the way of 

Firemen's Regulation Shirts, 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

Hats and Underwear, Etc. 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



\A/M. F. EGAN 

M. R. C. V. S. 

..VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D.. 



1155 QOLDEN GATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 

M. L. MILCOVICH. P,op. 

Martin's Restaurant and Grill 

1533 STEINER STREET 

Near Cearv San Fi 



Telephone Douglas 287 1 Home C 4992 

WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRANT BROKKRS 

630 KEARNY STREET 

COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Merrill 4447 



H. G. WILLIAMS 



Agent Northern California for the 



Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 



1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



Hell seems to have the most terrors 
to the person who pretends to believe 
that he is going to heaven 

Chicago voted Tuesday. April 2, 
against issuing bonds amounting to 
$1,800,000 for new fire houses and 
apparatus. 

An exchange says that an old crimi- 
nal was once asked what was the first 
step that led to his ruin, when he an- 
swered: "The first step was cheating 
an editor out of two years' subscrip- 
tion. When I had done that the devil 
had such a grip on me that I could not 
shake him off." 



THE 

PACIFICFIREMAN 

JOB DEPARTMENT 

IS NOW PREPARED TO PRINT 
LETTER HEADS 
BILL HEADS 
INVOICES 
STATEMENTS 
ENVELOPES 
BUSINESS CARDS 
WEDDING INVITATIONS 
DANCE PROGRAMS 
PERSONAL CARDS 
SHIPPING TAGS 
BILLS OF FARE, ETC 

479 "TURK STREET 

Phone FRANKLIN 6867 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



Phone Kearny 3523 Home C 1780 

JOE. H. ROSENBERG 

(f.inil aiift fHUitartt JTnilur 

73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 
Louis Frankenberg. formerly with Rosenblum & Abraham, Manager 



Home phone S 2517 

The Little Emporium 

L. RIZNIC Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 

2296-98 QEARY STREET 

Near Broderick 

Telephone West 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 



The t«">U;>|.)i<irir- ••]■■ th !■ >rs in New York City 
handle lSO.OUU '.-alls every rush hour. They will 
connect you with any oue of 500,000 subscribers 
In half a minute. 

Ask the exchange manager how he can handle 
all these calls, and he will tell you tersely, "By 
saving iiit- seconds." 

"Schedule time" is the keynote of American 

Industry. That means Howard time. Ti 
always somebody higher up holding a Howard 
u.iji h on the job— demanding the Howard type 
of accuracy and punctuality. 

The Howard la the one watch in the world 
wholly adapted to modern progress. It 
(he precise construction and the scientific ad- 
justment. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pay i' >r it. 

The price of each watch— from the 17-jewel 
(double roller) in a Crescent Extra «>r Jaa Boss 
E n.i gold-filled case al $40, to the 23-Jewt 

$150, a nil the Edward Howard model al $850— 
is fixed at the factory and a printed ticket at- 
tached. 

Find the Howard jeweler in your town and 
talk i." him. Not every jeweler can sell you a 
Howard. The jeweler who can is a good man 
to know. 

Admiral Sigsbee has written a little 1 1 

The Log of the Howard Watch.' 1 giving the 
record of his own Howard In the U S. Navy. 
You'll enjoy it. Drop us a post-card, Dept N. 
and we'll send you a copy. 
HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston, Mass 

T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 

71 WALLER ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 



SALVAR 

1 1 Will Save ) 

The Greatest BLOOD REMEDY in the World 

WILL CURE 

RHEUMATISM 

Acute or Chronic 



BLOOD POISON 



Acquired or Hereditary 



PARALYSIS 
CATARRH 
MALARIA 



Diseases of Liver, Kidneys and Bladder 



Diseases Peculiar to Women 



$10.00 FOR 40 TO 60 DAYS' TREATMENT 

Call or Write for our 100 Page Booklet 



TO THE PLJBUIC 

In offering Salvar to the public, we do so 
with perfect confidence, and state publicly our 
w illingness to have our remedy thoroughly tested 
in any fair and equitable manner, in the treat- 
ment of all diseases we claim it will relieve, and 
we will abide by a decision so given and dis- 
continue its sale at once if it is found different in 
any particular from what it is represented to be. 

SEITZ & MILLS. Agents 
1402 Market St., near 10th, San Francisco 




VOL. IX. -NO. 19 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, MAY 11, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



New York City 's Fire Loss. 

The report of Commission Johnson 
for the year 1911 shows a loss of 
$855.69 a blaze, and says the number 
of fires is very much reduced. He 
states that for the last six months of 
the year only thirty-six alarms a day 
were turned in. The Tribune says: 

Joseph Johnson, Fire Commissioner, 
made public his report to Mayor Gay- 
nor for 1911. The report shows that 
there were fire losses in the city for 
that year aggregating $12,470,806, an 
average loss of $855.69 a fire, as com- 
pared with a total of $8,591,831, or an 
average of $596.45 a fire in 1910. Four- 
teen fires alone, which occurred in the 
first six months of 1911, caused a loss 
of $3,758,065, In the entiie city during 
the whole year there were 13,868 fires, 
as compared with 14,405 fires for the 
year before. 

"The important achievement of the 
year in the fire department was the 
reduction in the last six months of 
1911 in the number of fires at the rate 
of 2452a year," Mr. Johnson stales in 
his report: "The number of fires in 
the first six months of 1911 was at the 
rate of forty-three a day and the num- 
ber in the last six months, up to De- 
camber 20. was thirty-six a day, a re- 
duction during the last six months of 
seven fires a day. This is the first 
sudden and substantial reduction in 
in the rale of fires in the history of 
the greater city. This reduction was 
brought about, in part, by a special 
and thonugli investigation of hazard- 
ous premises in the city, resulting in 
the placing of 5000 violations upon the 
Worst of the buildings. " 

Another important improvement in 



the fire service given the city, Johnson 
says, is the motorization of the fire 
department, which is well under way. 
There are now in the department, he 
says, forty-three motor vehicles, in- 
cluding one motor-driven steam pump- 
ing engine, one gasoline motor and 
pumping engine, one motor-propelled 
water tower and eight high-pressure 
hose wagons. The other motor vehicles 
are touring cars for executive officers, 
runabouts for deputy chiefs, delivery 
trucks, etc. Before December 31, 
1912, it is probable that 150 pieces of 
motor apparatus will be in service. 
There are under contract, due for de- 
livery during the first three months of 
1912, two gasoline-propelled pumping 
engines, one combination hose wagon 
and engine, motor-propelled; three 
high-pressure hose wagons, four au- 
tomobile hook and ladder trucks, two 
gas electric tractors for water towers, 
and two three-ton delivery trucks. 

An innovation for economy was 
made in the shoeing of the horses of 
the department, Johnson says, by 
which a saving of about $25,000 was 
brought about. During 1911 the old 
system of shoeing fire horses by con- 
tract was abolished, and ten horse- 
shoeing wagons, owned and operated 
by the department itself, were placed 
in service. During most of the year 
tin 1 tire department shod its horses 
with its own men. These wagons 
visited the various tire houses and the 
horses were shod on the premises. 

The committee on fire apparatus of 
Visalia has recommended to the city 
trustees the purchase of an auto fire 

engine from the Gorham Fire Appa- 
ratus Company. 



Pumping Station Is Given Its Last Test. 

Last Saturday the final tests of the 
machinery of pumping station No. 1 
of the city's high pressure water sys- 
tem for fire protection at the new 
building at Second and Townsend 
streets, resulting satifactorily, as had 
the previous trials, and the works and 
apparatus are now ready to be turned 
over to the city. This will probably 
be done within the coming week. The 
machinery, tanks and other appliances 
of the plant, together with fireproof 
structure which houses them, together 
cost half a million. 

This being, because of its location, 
the "show" station of the twoconnect- 
ed with the auxiliary system, its finish 
is considerably more expensive than it 
is proposed to give the Fort Mason 
station, though the machinery of the 
latter will also be fully up to the best 
modern standard. 

The tests at pumping station No. 1 
were public, all interested citizens be- 
ing invited to he present to inspect 
the building and witness the working 
of the machinery. A large number 
of residents availed themselves of the 
invitation and were shown over the 
works and given full explanations by 
City Engineer Manson and members 
of his start'. The demonstration con- 
tinued from 10 o'clock until I, and 
there was no time during that period 
that interested observers were not 
present. The Public Works Commis- 
sioners, several supervisors and va- 
rious other city officials dropped in 
during the day. 

A volunteer lire department is in 
process of formation at Taft, CbI. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



P 



'ACIFI 




IREMAN 



lead to their undoing. It is reported that 
Mayor Rolph proposes to take drastic action 
in the matter, even if no other official acts of 
the commissioners are taken in consideration. 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Edit. ir and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON . Business Manaeer 



Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street. 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 



Entered as second-class matter March 21. 1908. at the 
Postoflicc at San Francisco. Cat. under the Act of Con- 
press of March 3. 1879. 



SATURDAY . MAY 11. 1912 



We understand the reservoir at Twin Peaks, 
for the first time, was pumped half full of 
fresh water Thursday, containing about 5000 
gallons. 

The mailing list of a newspaper is some- 
times a wonder. Even the Pacific Fireman 
went to Italy last week, to N. Perrone, for- I 
merly a member of truck 2. 



Chas. E. Tegler of the Nevada City Fire 
Department was discussing motor-driven fire 
apparatus for his department with R. S. 
Chapman, fire protection engineer, Tuesday. 

The citizens of Santa Cruz are very much 
stuck up since the installation of its American- 
La France motor-driven chemical engine and 
hose motor car. The Santa Cruz Sentinel of 
May 7 publishes a list of about 25 cities, taken 
from an Eastern fire journal, which have re- 
cently installed American-La France motor- 
driven fire apparatus. 

At the tryout last Saturday afternoon of 
the Seagraveand Pope-Hartford chemical en- 
gines for the San Francisco Fire Department, 
the big Seagrave car suffered a bad setback 
by the breaking of its crank shaft at No. 6 
cylinder. The machine was traveling at 
twenty miles an hour up the steepest part of 
California street when the break occurred. 
An entire new motor is coming by express 
and will be installed and ready for its final 
test in about two weeks. 



President Brandenstein of the Fire Com- 
mission last week submitted an ordinance to 
the Board of Supervisors in which he says 
that the location of fire alarm boxes is known 
to a comparatively few number of the people 
living in the city. An alarm of fire, to bring 
help to do the most good, must be rushed to 
headquarters. The advertising of fire alarm 
boxes by different means does only temporary 
good. Hence he suggests the placing of the 
information on every house, so that there 
need be no delay m getting the right direc- 
tions before turning in alarms. 

The action of Fire t'ommissioners Dillon 
and Donohoe at last week's meeting of the 
Board in voting to retain George W. Giblin, a 
member of engine 23, in the department, 
despite the fact of the recommendations of 
Chief Murphy, Asst. Chief McCluskey, and 
Battalion Chiefs Radford and Layden that he 
be dismissed for general unfitness, disobe- 
dience and insubordination, will, it is thought, 



Death of Captain Miskel. 

Wm. F. Miskel, age 37, one of Die most 
popular captains of the San Francisco Fire 
Department, while on his way home at noon 
from the quarters of engine company 4 
dropped dead from heart failure last Satur- 
day in front of the hotel Argus on Third 
street. When leaving his home Saturday 
morning he complained of feeling ill, but 
when questioned by his wife said he thought 
it was nothing seri.<us, and the news of his 
sudden death therefore came as a great shock 
to his wife, relatives and his many friends. 

Captain Miskel had been a member of the 
fire department for fourteen years, and for 
the past two years was in command of engine 
company 4. He bore an excellent record and 
was highly esteemed by the members through- 
out the entire department. Not long ago he 
was very badly injured at a fire at Second 
and Mission streets, where, after being on 
duty for sixty hours, he fell and broke three 
ribs. He has served with many companies 
throughout the city and was said to be abso- 
lutely fearless in the face of danger. 

Captain Miskel was a Native Son and a 
member of the Widows and Orphans' Aid As- 
sociation of the San Francisco Fire Depart- 
ment, Mutual Aid Association and Veteran 
Firemen's Association of San Francisco. 

The funeral of the late Captain Miskel 
took place last Monday from the family resi- 
dence, 464 Jersey street, and at his bier was 
paid (Ileitis! tributes of love from scores of 
friends who had known and loved him in life. 
Few men in the fire department ever lived 
who were more generally loved or esteemed 
than Captain Wm. F. Miskel. 

At St. Phillips' Church a solemn high mass 
was celebrated for the repose of his soul. 
The interment was at Holv Cross Cemetery, 
by carriage. The funeral was one of the 
largest ever held in the fire department. 

Captain Miskel is survived by his wife and 
two brothers, Frank and John Miskel. both 
members of the fire department. The usual 
detail of firemen were present in command 
of Asst. Chief Dolan. 



Veteran Firemen's Picnic. 



The 13th annual picnic and outing of the 
Veteran Firemen's Association of San Fran- 
cisco at Fairfax Park Sunday, May 5, was a 
grand success both socially and financially. 
The day was all that could be desired tot 
such an affair, and the thousands who throng- 
ed the grounds from early morning until late 
in the afternoon viewed with each other in 
making the occasion one long to be remem- 
bered. 

The program of the day was carried out in 
every detail, and reflects great credit on the 
Committee of Arrangements, consisting of 
A. H. Leaf, Chairman; T. J. Coogan, Asst. 
Chairman; J. E. Britt, Secretary; W. D. 
Waters and Sam Baker. 



The Floor Committee, composed of Captain 
A. U. Welch and Captain George Brown, are 
certainly entitled to the thanks of the asso- 
ciation for the way in which they managed 
the immense crowds which patronized the 
dancing platform throughout the day and 
added much to the success of the occasion. 

It is reported the hardest worked man in 
the grounds was Captain Kenneally, who was 
flitting hither and thither all day among the 
young ladies, soliciting partners for the bash- 
ful old Vets who desired to dance. 

Around the Bay. 

[Speikil < 'iirre:-pori<l'-nci\ I 

The new Seagrave automobile combination 
hose wagon and chemical engine has been ac- 
cepted by the Richmond council. The engine 
was lested out Sunday afternoon under the 
supervision of Chief R. F. Paasch of the 
Point Richmond department. The engine 
was driven over muddy roads, up the steep- 
est hills with twenty men on hoard and lived 
up to its reputation for durability and effi- 
ciency. The city council was very much 
u with the engine and on Mondav night 
accepted it from Chas. A. Taber. manager of 
the Gorham Fire Apparatus Company. 

Howanl Yeager of the Fifth street com- 
pany of the Richmond Fire Department was 
married Sunday. 

Chief McMullen of the Richmond depart- 
ment has gone into the real estate business. 

Chief Paasch of the Point Richmond de- 
partment will be kept busy for the next few 
weeks drilling the boys how to handle the 
new auto engine. 

The Gotham Company have delivered sev- 
eral Seagrave combination engines to the 
different departments in the last few weeks. 
Palo Alto has received and accepted their en- 
gine. The new Seagrave engine for the San 
Francisco Fire Department will be tested out 
the latter part of the month, which is having 
a new crank shaft replaced and a new motor 
from the East. 

Bids for the extension of the high pressure 
salt water system will be received by 'he 
Oakland Commissioners May 15. The Oak- 
land t'ommissioners also ordered the adver- 
tising for bids for the purchase of a new au- 
tomobile combination hose wagon and chemi- 
cal engine similar tti the four they now have. 
Bids will ajso be received for an electric 
patrol wagon. 

Fire Chief Paasch is very much enthused 
over his new Seagrave motor-driven engine. 
In fact all Point Richmond as well rs Rich- 
mond seemed to think it was just about the 
thing, and all agreed that Richmond would 
have one in the near future. 



While wandering around the hills of the 
Potrero last week endeavoring Hi locate 
chemical 7 we ran 'foul of engine 16, with its 
traditional bell tower, and had the pleasure 
of meeting that old veteran;. Captain Byrnes, 
for the first time and his jollv crew of fire- 
lighters, who are there with the goods every 
time an "inside'' box comes in. We areglad 
to note that an addition is to be made to that 
house in the near future, which will make it 
more comfortable for the boys. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



San Francisco Fire Commissioners 



REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE. 

San Francisco, May 9, 1912. 

To the Honorable. Bo rd of Fire Como.i-sionera. 

Gentlemen: Your Administrative Commit- 
tee respectfully submits the following report 
on matters that have come before it for con- 
sideration since the last regular meeting of 
the Board, together with its recommendations 
for action thereon, as follows: 

Communication from Theo. Van Winsen, 
hoseman engine 38, making application for 
three months leave of absence, without pay. 
from July 1, 1912, to enable him to visit re- 
latives in Michigan and Holland. Recom- 
mended for approval. 

Weekly report of acting physician and sur- 
geon on sick and injured members of the de- 
partment. Filed. 

Communication from Edward O'Neill, driver 
engine 12. requesting leave of absence, with 
pay, for two weeks on account of illness. 
Recommended for approval. 

Communication from the Park-Richmond 
Improvement Club inquiring about fire house 
to be erected on Eighteenth avenue. Secre- 
tary directed to reply that upon the recom- 
mendation of the mayor the fire house will be 
located on Twelfth avenue. 

Joint communication from Robert, J. Harris, 
Superintendent of Horses, and Wm. F. Egan, 
Department Veterinary Surgeon, recommend- 
ing that five horses of the department be 
condemned as unfit for further service for 
various reasons. Recommend that they be 
condemned and the matter of whether they 
be sold or turned over to another department 
left to the discretion of the chief engineer. 

Petition signed by Kohler & Chase et al., 
requesting the removal of truck company 1 
from its present quarters on O'Farrell street 
to a location on Mint avenue. Filed. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
reporting the suspension of Thomas D. Hen- 
neberry, truckman truck S, for refusing to 
pay his debts. Recommended for approval. 
Communication from the chief engineer, 
reporting that Substitute Alexander Buch- 
anan, assigned to engine 35, has been dis- 
missed for failing to report back to his com- 
pany on May 3, 1912. Recommended for ap- 
proval. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
submitting reports on meritorious conduct of 
R. Remy, truckman truck 2, and J. Klatt, 
hoseman engine 5, and recommending that 
their names be referred to Hie Committee for 
the Investigation of Acts and Valor for inves- 
tigation and report. Recommended for ap- 
proval. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
reporting having restored Truckman Henne- 
bery to duly, he having satisfactorily com- 
menced to pay his outstanding indebtedness. 
Recommended for approval. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
reporting having re-assigned probationary 
member Samuel Markowitz, from hoseman 

engine 2 to driver chemical 8. R mmended 

for approval 
Communication from the chief engineer, 



reporting that probationary member J. J. 
Mullally, truckman truck 4, has satisfactorily 
served his probationary term and recom- 
mending that he be permanently appointed a 
member of this department. Recommended 
for approval. 

Communication from John T. Fitzsimmons, 
relief company 1, asking to be assigned to 
duty in engine company 45, his disability hav- 
ing ceased. Recommended for approval. 

Communication from H. E. Hunt, city 
editor of the Chronicle, requesting fifteen fire 
badges for use during the ensuing fiscal year. 
Refer to secretary to acknowledge receipt. 

Communication from theCivil Service Com- 
mission, advising that Albert H. Spiegel has 
been removed from the register of eligible 
hydrantmen, he having failed to signify will- 
ingness to accept appointment from said list. 
Filed. 

Communication from the Civil Service Com- 
mission, requesting certain information as to 
the standing of Thos. F. McLaughlin, eligible 



Recommended for approval. 

Communication from Gustav Pohlman, Sec- 
retary F. O. E., thanking the Board for allow- 
ing the members of the fire department to 
participate in a tug-o-war. Filed. 

Communication from Geo. McAlevy, Chief 
of the Tacoma Fire Department, in regard to 
Seagrave fire apparatus now in service in 
their department, stating that same has given 
entire satisfaction. Filed. 

Chas. A. Taber, representing the Gorham 
Fire Apparatus Co., was granted an ex- 
tension of twenty-two days time to replace a 
new crank shaft and install anew motor from 
the East in their new Seagrave chemical en- 
gine which broke while climbing the third 
grade hill at 20 miles an hour in California 
street while undergoing a test last Saturday 
afternoon. 

An attorney appeared, supposedly in behalf 
of George Giblin. When asked the name of 
the party who he claimed to represent he 
stated he did not know, caused a ripple of 



Where's Captain Wralty? 

He's spading up his garden 
To plant his beans and peas, 

And wants to bet a dollar 
That none of them will freeze. 



Hoseman Shea is certainly the live wire of 
engine company 28. 

When anyone mentions "twins" around en- 
gine company 1 Cole takes on a smile you 



couldn't rub off with a brick, 
them. 



Ask him about 



"This world is a poor abiding place for a 
man with no appetite" says Tom Gilcrist of 
truck 7. Tom seems to worry along just the 
same. 

If we please others, why not you? 
O'Conncr, the Florist, 2756 Mission street. 
Phone Mission 5088. 



hydrantman, as a brass finisher. Referred to laughter in the audience and members of the 
secretary to give the desired information. Board, when he withdrew. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
recommending that fire alarm box 559, now 
located at Twenty-second and Vermont 
streets, will be re-located in the gate house 
at the Tuberculosis hospital on San Bruno 
avenue, south of Twenty-second street. Re- 
commended for approval. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
recommending that a one-story class "A" 
building be erected for use as a central fire 
alarm station on some isolated spot in one of 
the parks. Recommended for approval. 

Communication from the city attorney, 
stating that the lot located on the southwest 
corner of Alvarado street and Hoffman ave- 
nue has been purchased for this department. 
Recommended for approval. 

Communication from Frank Neall Robin- 
son, M. D., Monrovia, California, stating 
that Battalion Chief M. J. Farley is still un- 
der his care suffering from pulmonary tuber- 
culosis. Filed. 

Communication from Ed. J. Murphy, h.ise- 
man engine 26, making application for thirty 
days leave of absence, without pay, beginning 
June 1, 1912, on account of illness. Recom- 
mended for approval. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
reporting the sudden death of Captain Wm. 
Miskel of engine I. on Saturday, May 4, 1912, 
from heart disease. Filed. 

Communication from Wm. F. Egan, De- 
partment Veterinary Surgeon, stating thai he 
has examined and treated all horses that have 
been sick or injured during the month of 
April, and that he passed seven horses pur- 
chased for i he depart mem . Pih d. 

Communication from Robert .1 Harris, Su- 
perintendent of Horses, submitting report on 
horses and forage for the month of April 

Filed. 

Communication from S. .1. Charcho, car- 
riage blacksmith a) the corporalion yard, 
in ilvmg application for salary during disabl- 
litj cau id by .i piece of emery Hying and 

silking liis eye while on duly ipril 80, 1912. 



After Willie Johnson took "Bull" Collins to 
see the fight last Saturday night he took him 
down Market street to see if he could get a 
fight for his heavyweight, Charlie Horn. 

Dennie O'Connell says Captain Otto is the 
best-hearted man in the fire department for 
I. 1 1 me. him go to the Vets' picnic. Dennie 
says he hopes next year to return the com- 
pliment. 



The members of engine 1 were initialed in 
the shawl making art something over a year 
ago by "Koko the Weaver." a young English- 
man, fi i whence the craze has spread to 

about every house in the department, They 
ar rtainly i In- pioneet 



Fcbphooa DouhIbi 1255 

U. J. BORCK, ■'"' ■ ah ok 

MAKES A SPECIA1 TY OF 
PIREMEN'S V UNIFORMS 

ALSO FINE CIVILIAN SUITS 
93 EDDY STREET San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Florence Stone and Wilson Melrose 
will close their season at the Alcazar 
in an elaborate revival of David Be- 
lasco's imperishable play, "The Girl 
of the Golden West," in which both 
of them have successfully appeared 
elsewhere, Miss Stone in the title part 
and Mr. Melrose as the road agent. 
In preparing the production Stage Di- 
rector Butler has received many valua- 
ble ideas from Miss Blanche Bates, 
who originated the role of The Girl 
and starred in it throughout three 
seasons, two of them on Broadway. 
By many critics "The Girl of the Gol- 
den West" has been pronounced Be- 
lasco's masterpiece. Certain it is that 
no work from the pen of that versatile 
playwright has achieved greaterfame. 
Since its release for stock company 
use it has been drawing the highest 
royalties ever paid. Each of the four 
acts presents a stage picture of mar- 
velous realism. 



FOR BETTER FIRE PROTECTION 
in the: village: 

a seagrave 2-wheel hand-drawn chemical 




GORHAM FIRE APPARATUS CO. 



SEATTLE 

2 1 6 Jackson Street 



SAN PRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Street 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 S. Olix 



Empress Theatre. 



Am erican Rubber iWfg. Co. 

9-11 Beale Street. San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories— Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 



John F. Conroy, champion life saver, 
and Miss La Diva, champion woman 
diver, will headline the offering at the 
Empress, starting with the matinee 
Sunday afternoon. Guy Brothers, two 
burnt-cork comedians, who are mu- 
sicians of no mean ability, will fur- 
nish the added feature. Lee Tung 
l'oo, the only original Chinese bari- 
tone singer and mimic will return 
after a successful Eastern engage- 
ment. Toku Kisshe, a Niponese acro- 
bat and juggler, outshines his rivals 
in this line of endeavor by reason of 
the swiftness and daring with which 
he performs. A protean comedy 
sketch will he presented by G. Harris 
Eldon and Bessie Clifton under the 
title of "His Awful Nightmare. " A 
lively pair, Josie and Willie Barrows, 
will sing and dance their way into 
popular favor. Billy Chase will co- 
mede with a bunch of clever songs 
and no end of good stories. Pritzkow 
and Blanchard will offer a dainty bit 
in "A Mixed Affair," a skit showing 
their versatility and cleverness. Miss 
Jean Belle Hickok. the fascinating 
niece of President Taft, will be anoth- 
er noteworthy feature. Miss Hickok 
has a delightful repertoire of popular 
and classical hits. 



WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINK OF 



Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cott<m Fin Hose, Engine Suction Hose, Brass 

Goodx. Valves mid All Fin- Department Si/fiJiix 

When You're Buyin' Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to 
reed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are marriec 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

l_. H. &. B. I. BILL 

Sole Distributors for the Pacific Coast 543 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 





PACIFIC FIREMAN 



BROTHER TABER : 

In connection with the Hanford (California) purchase of a motor combination chemical engine 
and hose wagon a little over a year ago, where you finally succeeded in putting one over on the good people 
there in the shape of one of your incomparable Columbus productions, you issued a little card for the benefit 
of the undersigned, the principal effusion on which was: 

"Most people prefer to be buried in a cemetery, but the mem- 
bers of the Hanford Fire Department prefer a Seagrave. " 

In the light of recent motor fire apparatus events, it would appear that the good people of San Francisco 
may become a little apprehensive of your "Titanic," for the reason that on its maiden voyage your passen- 
gers '"saw things" that very closely resembled a "Sea-grave." 

-CHAPMAN. 
It is your move. 



AMERICAN-LA FRANCE FIRE ENGINE CO. 

Builders of 
Sane, Safe and Reliable 

MOTOR FIRE APPARATUS 



San Francisco Fire Department: 

American -La France four-cylinder seventy 
horse-power motor-driven double 80-gallon chemi- 
cal fire engine: 

Delivered 30 days ahead of contract date. 

Actual road weight with engine charged and five 
men, 8983 pounds. 

Official time over California street hill, from 
Battery street to the Fairmont, One Minute and 
Forty Seconds. 

Delivered in January, 1912. Has never been to 
the shop for repairs or adjustment. 



San Francisco Underwriters' Fire Patrol: 

Four-cylinder seventy horse-power American-La 
France motor service wagon (same chassis as the 
fire department chemical) delivered in May, 1911. 
Has been in service a year and has run over 700 
miles to and from fires. Has never been to the 
shop for repairs or adjustment. 

Second of the same cars for the fire Patrol de- 
livered in January, same lime as (he lire depart- 
ment chemical. Has never been to the shop for 
repairs or adjustment 



To date there has not beer a cent of expense of any kind in connection with the operation and upkeep 
of these three San Francisco American-La France motor fire ears aside fr< m the necessary gas< lii e ar.d oil. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Freeh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering: plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening, Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION ISS3 

To Reach Nurseries, take Castro street car to 23rd. or 

Mission, 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



Phone Home J 2549 

EMIL SCHOENBEIN 



Fireman Cap Maker 

Formerly of 21st and Folsom 
...WILLIAMS. : BUILDING... 

THIRD STREET 



Cor. Mission, Room 307 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone 1 j r% 

"— c 2456 Lamanet Bros. 

1» the place of all places to gel the very latest and be*t in the way ol 

Firemen's Regulation Skirts, 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

Hats and Underwear, Etc. 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



\A/M. F. EGAN 

M. R. C. V. S. 

..VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D.. 



1155 aol.DEN GATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 

M. L. M1LCOVICH. Prop. 

Martin's Restaurant and Grill 

1533 STEINER STREET 



Telephone Doujlai 287 1 Home C 4992 

WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARR ANT BROKERS 

630 KEARNY STREET 

COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



The Telephone Girl. 

The telephone girl sits still in her 

chair 
And listens to voices from every- 
where. 
She hears all the gossip, she hears all 

the news; 
She knows who is happy and who has 

the blues. 
She knows of our sorrows, she knows 

all our joys; 
She knows every girl who is chasing 

the boys. 
She knows of our troubles, she knows 

of our strife; 
She knows every man who is mean to 

his wife. 
She knows every time we are out with 

the boys, 
She hears the excuses each fellow 

employs. 
She knows every woman who has a 

dark past. 
She knows every man who's inclined 

to be fast. 
In fact there's a secret 'neath each 

saucy curl 
Of that quiet, demure-looking tele- 
phone girl. 
If the telephone girl told all that she 

knows, 
It would turn half our friends into 

bitterest foes. 
She could sow a small wind that would 

be a big gale, 
Engulf us in trouble and land us in 

jail. 
She could let go a story, which gain- 
ing in force 
Would cause half our wives to sue for 

divorce. 
She could get all our churches mixed 

up in a tight, 
And turn all our days into sorrowing 

night. 
In fact she could keep the whole town 

in a stew. 
If she'd tell one tenth part of the things 

that she knew. 
Oh, brother, now doesn't it make your 

head whirl. 
When you think what you owe to the 

telephone girl ? 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



The telephone operators In New York City 
handle 130,000 calls every rush hour. They will 
connect you with any oue of 500,000 subscribers 
in half a minute. 

Ask the exchange manager how he can handle 
all these calls, and he will tell you tersely, "By 
saving ; he sec ndfi 

"Schedu.e time" is the keynote nf American 
Industry. That means Howard time. There's 
always somebody higher up holding a Howard 
"Watch on the Job— demanding the Howard type 
of accuracy and punctuality. 

The Howard is the one watch in the world 
wholly adapted to modern progress. It has 
the precise construction and the scientific ad- 
justment. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pay for it. 

The price of each watch— from the 17-jewel 
(double roller) in a Crescent Extra or .las. Boss 
Extra gold-filled case at MO, to the 28-jewel at 
Jir.it. and the Edward Howard nrndel at $3^0 — 
is fixed at the factory and a printed ticket at- 
tached. 

Find the Howard jeweler in your town and 
talk to him. Not every jeweler can sell you a 
Howard. The jeweler who can is a good man 
to know. 

Admiral Slgsbee has written a little t k, 

•■The Log of the Howard Watch," giving the 

record of his own Howard In the U. S Navy. 

enjoy it. Drop us a post-card, Dept .V 

and we'll semi you B cony. 

HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston. Mass 

T. H. K1LGO 

DIAMONDS AIND JEWELRY 

71 WALLLRST.. SAN FRANCISCO 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 



Victor Victrolas 



Columbia Grafonolas 



Victor and Columbia Records 
Inventigate Our New Club Plan 

KOHLER & CHASE 

26 0'EA.RRELU STREET 



Phone Kearny 3523 



HorneC 1760 



JOE. H. ROSENBERG 

(Eiiiil anfi iHUitarii Sailnr 

73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 
Louil Frankeabern, formerly with Rotenblum & Abraham. Manager 



Home phone S 2517 

The Little Emporium 

L. R1ZNIC Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 

2296-98 GEARY STREET 

Near BrodericL 
Telephone We>t 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 



A Petaluma man (it wasn't Barricks) 
hearing a great commotion in his 
chicken house one dark night, took 
his revolver and went to investigate. 

"Who's there?" he sternly demand- 
ed, opening the door. 

No answer. 

"Who's there? Answer, or I'll 
shoot!" 

A trembling voice from the farthest 
corner. 

"Deed, sah, dey ain't nobody hyah 
'ceptin' us chickens." 




IREMAN 




VOL. IX. -NO. 20 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, MAY 18, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



The Fire Fighters of Los 
Angeles. 

George W. Patterson. Fire Department Photographer, in 
Insurance and Investment News, 

Engine 4 and truck 1 and the machine 
shop are located at 227 Aliso street. 
This house was opened in 1900. In 
1904 the truck was replaced by the 
water tower, which remained about 
six years, until it went to its present 
home, engine 24, when the truck was 
returned te engine 4. They say "they 
all must go" to this house sooner or 
later, and some apparatus goes both 
sooner and later; for the machine shop 
is a very important part of the fire 
department. 

Engine 4 is a first size Metropolitan, 
with 103 per cent efficiency after 
eleven years' service, which speaks 
well for the machine, and its past and 
present engineers— Dunn, McMichael. 
Sim White and Saben. Kid Horse, on 
the engine, has seen nineteen years of 
service in the department, and is good 
yet; Molly, the only one of her sex 
now drawing fire apparatus in the 
city, and Jim, a new horse, do the 
heavy work of getting the big engine 
to the lire in lime. George and Jack 
sure ran amble along with the chemi- 
cal hose wagon when an alarm comes 
in. and Buck and Ren can hike up 
Temple street hilt wit hout a flutter, 
palling i he four-ton laddi r truck, 
which is also some efficiency . 

Roll call for the house is as fellows: 

Engine side — F. ('. McDowell, cap- 
tain; II. M. Black, lieutenant; [•'. Ha- 
ben, engineer; 11. C. Clark, Btoker; 
A. Ramerez, engine driver; W. J. 
Itoeder, relief driver; A. R. Walker. 



wagon driver; E. H. Ricks, relief 
driver; E. W. Robinson, W. E. Barto, 
J. B. Dudley, D. W. Waldschmidt. 

Truck side — A. H. Hatfield, lieuten- 
ant; E. C. Phelps, driver; H. H. 
Gates, relief driver; W. F. Crumb, 
tillerman; H. A. Coif, relief tiller- 
man; E. F. Greehy, E. T. Millane, S. 
J. Robinson, O. F. Ray, G. W. White. 

Twenty-three men in all. Then 
there are fifteen men in the machine 
shop, which is presided over by A. 
Price, superintendent of engines, ably 
assisted by J. V. Ainsworth, W. A. 
Howard, E. G. Henry, R. G. Richards, 

A. H. Rutter, R. Scazighini, Lee Ne- 
venhisen (blacksmith), H. M. Corsetto, 
C. K. Chamberlain, Ed. Valencia, C. 

B. May. J. T. Walker, Joe Schlenker 
and A, Bryden. 

This may be called the strenuous 
house, for from it have came Chief 
Eley, Assistant Chief George Connell, 
Captain Hill of engine 24, Captain 
Davis of engine 25. Lieut. Norton, 
acting captain of engine 11, and Lieut. 
Levy of hose 2. Also from here have 
been borne away those who have suc- 
cumbed to the fntal pole hole, through 
which four men have fallen, two to 
their death. First, Ed. Reiley stepped 
through in the daytime, very nearlj 
striking Captain Eley in his fall, but 
fortunately he recovered. Then .1. Y. 
Delvalle, al night, in pulling up his 
turnouts, stumbli d and fell through 

the hole. I le reeo\ el eil enOUgh to gO 

back to work, but fate had it in for 
him, and tipped the engine over onto 
him, and from a combination of these 
two injuries he succumbed some lime 
later. A. 1'ihlerrain miscalculated bis 

angle in the dark. He recovered and 



is now on the pension list. In 1911 
the final fatality was G. O. Fitch, who 
never could tell just how he happened 
to go through, though he lingered in 
the hospital for months. Now, how- 
ever, we are happy to say that all the 
pole holes here, as well as at many of 
the other houses, have been protected 
by a railing, so that men leaving their 
beds, perhaps only half awake, will 
not wander into them. 

At fires there have been several 
minor injuries, but the most serious 
for any one at engine 4 was several 
years ago when a 300-pound roll of 
paper fell on Capt. Eley and put him 
out of commission for about a year. 

The most noted act in life-saving 
was four years ago by Barney Haley, 
now of engine 21, who, during a room- 
ing house fire at Jackson and San 
Pedro heard the groans of a bed-rid- 
den, crippled old man. and at really 
great risk to his life searched around 
in the dense smoke until be located 
and carried him out. All agree that 
Barney was the real stuff that day, 
although it didn'i gel him anything 
from Carnegie; for it takes endurance 
as well as perseverance to stay in the 
smoke the time necessary to accom- 
plish such an act. 

It will also be rememben d that < !apt. 
McDowell was a close second to Lieut. 
A. W. Brown in his sensational stop- 
page of n runawaj . 

"Babe," I he mast ol fox terrier, is 
champion rat -catcher of the China- 
tow n disl net. and « ill eat anything, 
very fond of Chinamen. Saj " 'Bs 

get the Chinamen," and she usually 
gets al least one shoe. She was raised 
by Capt. Eley. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 




PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 



Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street. 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 



Entered as second-class matter March 21. 190S. at the 
Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 



SATURDAY MAY 18. 1912 



John Bohnet, a member of the Police and 
Fire Commission of Lansing Mich., who at- 
tended the Imperial Council of the Mystic 
Shrine held at Los Angeles last week, visited 
many of the fire stations of this department 
this week. 

Chas. A. Taber of the Gorham Fire Appa- 
ratus Company has accumulated a bunch of 
grey hairs since the accident to the big Sea- 
grave double-eighty chemical two weeks ago, 
and states he hasn't a competitor whom he 
hates enough to wish him the same amount 
of worry over the accident. 

Last week the Fire Commission sent a com- 
munication to the Board of Supervisors call- 
ing attention to the necessity of an ordinance 
providing that doors in all public buildings 
shall open outward in order to provide a quick 
exit in time of fire. The Board also trans- 
mitted to the Supervisors a report showing 
that practically every school in the city needs 
additional fire protection. Forty-five schools 
are listed and their fire protection needs set 
forth, ranging from a number of institutions 
where fire escapes are required to others 
where hose and extinguishers would be 
sufficient. 

Should Firemen Receive Full Month's 
Salary When Going on Vacation? 

The Chronicle of last Saturday quotes Au- 
ditor Boyle with the statement that he was 
ready to sign the demands of all firemen for 
a full month if they are going on their vaca- 
tion at the middle of the month, so that they 
can receive a full month's salary in advance 
of the regular pay day, as has been the cus- 
tom, he claims, for the past two years. 

But the Fire Commission and Chief Murphy 
do not seem to fall in line with Boyle's idea 
that the demands of the men be made out 
now so that they may be audited before the 
middle of the month. 

Boyle, in answer to the Fire Board, quotes 
Chapter 8, Section 2, of the charter, which 
provides that firemen be allowed two week's 
leave each year with no loss of pay. 

Nowhere in Chapter 8, Section 2, does the 
Charter state that firemen going on vacation 
the middle of the month are to receive a full 
month's salary. Custom doesn't make law. 

If we are going to abide by the Charter let 
us live up to it and if not let us throw it out 
of the window, and inform the Freeholders, 



who put m their time and energy compiling 
it, that they did not know what they were 
doing. 

The same paper quotes Chief Murphy as 
follows: 

Fire Chief Murphy says that there are only 
a few members of the department who want 
to get paid before going on their vacations, 
and that he does not approve paying firemen 
their salaries until earned. He states that 
until two years ago nobody thought of paying 
demands for the full month in advance of the 
regular pay day merely to furnish the men on 
vacation with money for their trips, and he 
found that the plan did not work well. 

Chief Murphy says that no member of the 
department is entitled, under the law, to pay- 
ment of his salary untii it has been earned. 
Further, he states, there have been instances 
of firemen collecting their salaries for the full 
month in advance, and then quitting the de- 
partment. Most of the men provide for their 
vacation expenses, he says, and do not ask or 
require any favor of the kind mentioned. 

Civil Service Examination for Firemen 
in Fire Department. 

Held February 22, 1912. 

ATHLETIC TEST. 

(Total credits, 100. Weight 5.) 

1. Ladder Work. Hand over hand on lad- 
der, up and down seven rungs. Only one 
hand allowed on each rung. Perfect mark, 
10 credits. 

2. Lifting J,S lb. Dumb Bell. Five lifts 
with each hand. Lifts to he made from low- 
est reach of arm to highest reach, without 
aid of jerk or swing, while standing erect 
with feet close together. Perfect mark, 10 
credits. 

3. High Jump. 4 ft. 2in., lOcredits; 4 ft., 
8 credits; 3 ft. 8 in., 6 credits; :! ft. 4 in., 4 
credits. 

4. Vaulting the Horse. Perfect vault over 
horse 4 ft. 4 in. high, without touching it 
with any part of body except the hands, 10 
credits; good vault, 7$ credits; fair vault, 5 
credits. 

5. Dipping on Parallel Bars. Four dips, 
2J credits each. Dips must be made with 
legs straight and without assistance of kick 
or swing. 

6. Carrying 11,0 lb. Dummy. Dummy 
must be lifted from floor to the shoulder and 
carried up and down an inclined 20-foot lad- 
der. Mark, 10 credits. 

7. Running. (Distance about 145 yards.) 

Time Credits Time Credits 

20 seconds, 40: 24 seconds, 24; 

21 " 36; 25 " 20; 

22 " 32; 26 " 10; 

23 " 28; 27 " 5; 
(Hals-seconds will be rated proportionately.) 

GENERAL KNOWLEDGE OF DUTIES 

1. You are on watch in your fire house 
from 10 p. m. to 2 a. m. Your relief fails to 
arrive. What course would you pursue? 5 
credits. 

2. What duties are required of a driver 
with respect to the horses under his charge? 
12 credits. 



3. What provision has been made for 
fighting a big fire on the water front? 18 
credits. 

4. Immediately on return from a fire, 
what is the duty of a company in taking care 
of its apparatus and horses? 10 credits. 

5. What are the rules of the Fire Depart- 
ment respecting intoxicating beverages? B 
credits. 

6. What is the rule of the Fire Depart- 
ment respecting the payment of debts con- 
tracted after entering the service, and what 
is the penalty for violation? 4 credits. 

7. Give location by streets of the following: 
Main Postoffice; Coliseum; Columbia Theatre; 
Hotel St. Francis; New City Hall (tempora- 
ry); Merchants Exchange; Main building 
Home Telephone Company; Main building, 
Pacific Telephone Company; Lane Hospital. 
18 credits. 

8. Mention one of the most valuable recent 
improvements made in connection with fire 

j fighting apparatus. 10 credits. 

9. What precautions have been taken since 
April, 1906, to prevent serious conflagrations? 
18 credits. 

WRITING OF REPORT-100 CREDITS. 

You are employed at Engine Company No. 
17. At 2:10 p. m. an alarm is sounded for a 
fire in the Pacific Building. 

Write a report, containing at least one 
hundred words, addressed to Captain John 
Doe of said company, covering the following 
points: 

1. Time of arrival at fire; 2. Route fol- 
lowed to fire; 3. Location of your engine; 4. 
You are ordered into the building and the 
stairway is filled with smoke. Describe as- 
cent to the third floor; 5. You found a man 
insensible on fourth floor, and the stairways 
and elevator are cut off by flames. How uid 
you get the man to the ground? 

ARITHMETIC. 

(Eight questions at 12J credits each.) 
No credit will be given unless the work is 
shown in full. 

1. Multiply 84956 by 70508. 

2. Divide 64128 by 32. 

3. Subtract 275849 from 940302. 

4. How many seconds are there in one da>? 

5. If you were a hoseman in the Fire De- 
partment, with four years' service, and your 
daily expenses for last month February) 
amounted to three dollars, how much of your 
salary for said month did you save.? 

6. You draw a check on your bank for 
$170, and find that it will take two-fifths of 
the sum you have in your account. How 
much did you have in the bank at the lime 
the check is drawn? 

7. How many horses can be bought for 
$1595, if five horses cost $725? 

8. If a horse is fed nine quarts of oats a 
day, how many quarts of oats will it take to 
feed eight horses fur twelve days? 

Harry Hock, the crackerjack driver of 
chemical 6. who was elected by his host of 
friends something over a year ago as King of 
the Hayes Valley Carnival, made this office -. 
pleasant call last week and enriched our 
exchequer by $2.00. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 




PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Richard Bennett's limited season at 
the Alcazar will be opened next Mon- 
day evening with the famous detec- 
tive-thief play, "Alias Jimmy Valen- 
tine," adapted by Paul Armstrong 
from one of the late O'Henry's most 
fascinating stories, "A Retrieved Re- 
formation," in which the dramatist 
has elaborated a consistent plot into 
an exceedingly interesting series of 
incidents. When it was last present- 
ed in this city "Alias Jimmy Valen- 
tine" attracted capacity-taxing au- 
diences to each performance during 
its two week's stay in a theatre charg- 
ing double the admittance prices 
scheduled at the Alcazar. In the title 
part Mr. Bennett will be aided by 
Mabel Morrison as Miss Lane, Louis 
Bennison as an old Oriental, Burt 
Wesner as the detective, Chas. Rug- 
gles as Valentine's "pal," Charles 
Gunn as Rose's father, Edmond Lowe 
as her uncle, Phyllis Gregory as her 
little sister, Adele Belgarde and Viola 
Leach as workers for prison reform 
and Howard Holland as the warden, 
with the rest of the regular players 
nicely cast. 

Empress Theatre. 

John F. Conroy, world's greatest 
life saver and Miss La Diva, champion 
lady swimmer and diver, have a spec- 
talular and very interesting aquatic 
novelty, and Toku Kisshe, who gives 
a sensational and thrilling exhibition 
of nerve in his slide for life, are the 
applause winners in this week's Em- 
press bill. "The Mayor and the Mani- 
cure," one of Geo. Ade's best known 
vaudeville comedy triumps, will be 
presented as the Headline attraction, 
James F. Fulton and Mattie Choate, 
supported by a capable cast. The 
Richardini Troupe of athletes will con- 
tribute the athletic portion of ihe bill. 
Miss Wilma Richardini is Fa : d to 1 e 
the strongest woman in the world. 
Eugene Barnes and Paul Barron will 
present a laughable Jewish farce, en- 
titled "After the Reception," includ- 
ing some timely parodies. England 
will contribute another of her tiny co- 
mediennes in the person of Alma, a 
diminutive lats. with ea'chy s< ns and 
splendid dnncing. Deeley ;ird Barlow, 
two natty entertainers will be heard 
in singing and playing. Prof. Arturo 
Ballarini will present his canine won- 
ders for the delight of the kiddies and 
grown-ups. Ballerini is said to have 
trained his dogs to the acme of per- 
fection. Geo. Taylor, a clever piano- 
loguist, and Williams and Chester in 
singing and dancing complete the bill. 



FOR BETTER FIRE PROTECTION 

IN THE VILLAGE 

A SEAGRAVE 2-WHEEL HAND-DRAWN CHEMICAL 




GORHAM FIRE APPARATUS CO. 



SEATTLE 

216 Jackson Streel 



SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Street 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 S. Olive Street 



American Rubber Mfg. Co. 



9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories — Park Avenue and Walt Street, Oakland, Cal. 



WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 



Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose, Brass 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Department Supplies 



When You're Buyin' Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 





L. H. &. B. 

Sole Distributors for the Pacific Coast 



I. BILL 

543 Golden (iate Ave., San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



San Francisco Fire Commissioners 

REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE. 

San Francisco, May 16, 1912. 

To the Honorable, Bo^rd of Fire Commissioners. 

Gentlemen: Your Administrative Commit- 
tee respectfully submits the following report 
on matters that have come before it for con- 
sideration since the last regular meeting of 
the Board, together with its recommendations 
for action thereon, as follows: 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
submitting report of Battalion Chief George 
Bailey, making complaint against Peter Ho- 
ran, hoseman engine 10, for being unable to 
report for duty on account of being under the 
influence of liquor. Recommend that charges 
be preferred. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
submitting report of Battalion Chief Wills, 
stating that he has suspended H. Butterly, 
truckman truck 3, for being under the influ- 
ence of liquor while on duty. Recommend 
that charges be preferred. 

Communication from the Civil Service Com- 
mission, advising that we may appoint fortv- 
flve non-civil service firemen who were em- 
ployed during the month of April, until May 
15. Filed. 

Communication from E. P. Brennan, engi- 
neer engine 39, making application for thirty 
days' leave of absence from July 1 to August 
1, without pay, in addition to leave granted 
April 11 from June 1 to July 1. Recommend- 
ed for approval. 

Communication from Chas. Heggum, lieu- 
tenant truck 7, making application for leave 
of absence, with pay, for one week, on ac- 
count of illness. Recommended for approval. 

Communication from John Figuera, truck- 
man truck 6, making application for leave of 
absence for fifteen days, with pay, from May 
15, on account of illness. Recommended for 
approval. 

Communication from John F. Kearney, 
hoseman fire boat 1, making application for 
fifteen days' leave of absence, without pay, 
from May 20, to attend to important private 
affairs. Recommended for approval. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Matter of imposing penalty on George E. 
Giblin, hoseman engine 21. for absenting him- 
self from duly without permission on March 
29 and 80. Lai.l over. 

NEW BUSINESS. 

Matter of hose specifications, calling for 
5,000 Eeel IJ inch, 5,000 feel SJinch and 10,000 
feet 2j inch rubber-lined hose. Laid over. 

Resolution appointing f'ortv nine firemen in 
this riepartnunl dulj certified by (he Civil 
Service Commission from their eligible list of 
firemen, subject to assignment of 1 In- chief. 

Sixty eligibles were asked for; Nos. 1 and 
28 waived; 40 did not appear; Nos. 4, 11, 20, 
25, 26, 80, 37, 44, 51 and 60 have not com- 
pleted their physical examinations. 

Around the Bay. 

I S|k riiil ( ', j i i ,- ■ t '■ -I >i t, ■ r t. ■ . | 

Tin' Martinez Fire Department observed 
Sunday as memorial day in honor of t he mem- 
bers who have passed away. A procession 



was formed and the members marched to the 
cemetary where wreathes and flowers were 
placed upon the graves. This is an annual 
custom of the department. 

Whether to purchase a new gasoline trac- 
tor or to buy a new team of horses to propel 
the hook and ladder truck of the Webb ave- 
nue company is a question that is puzzling 
the officials of Alameda. The cost of a good 
team would be about two-thirds the cost of a 
tractor, but the maintenance of the team 
would soon bring the cost to an even figure. 
The Board of Police and Fire Commissioners 
decided to ask the Council to provide in its 
budget for $600 for the fire pension fund; $500 
for a tractor for the hook and ladder; $6500 
for a new motor driven hook and ladder 
truck, and $10,000 for an auto pumping engine. 

John Mattheis, who has served over twenty 
years in the Alameda department, will pro- 
bably retire on a pension, providing the pen- 
sion fund is granted. 

Chief Ball had the new auto chemical en- 
gines out on parade Wednesday. Motion pic- 
tures of the Moose parade were taken and 
the newSeagrave machines were in it. These 
pictures will be shown throughout the country. 

The boys of the Sixth street engine house 
report things quiet— no deaths, no sickness, 
no births, no marriages. This company has 
a new motor driven chemical and a motor 
driven hook and ladder truck, and has a full 
paid crew of men. 

The new apparatus that was purchased by 
Oakland from the Webb Apparatus Company, 
and from the Seagrave Company has arrived 
and will be installed in the Elmhurst and 
Thirteenth avenue fire houses. Commissioner 
Turner has made application to the Civil Ser- 
vice Commissioners for a sufficient number of 
men to man the two new companies. 

Chief Fred Krauth of the Alameda depart- 
ment is having his share of trouble. At the 
recent election the bonds for new automobile 
fire apparatus failed to carry, and now the 
Society lor the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Animals say that the horses are being abused 
by being required to pull the hook and ladder 
truck to distant fires with a number of men 
aboard. It is now up to Chief Krauth to in- 
vent a new method of propelling his hook and 
ladder truck, or purchase a hand-drawn hook 
and ladder truck. 



Where's Lieut. Roebling? 

lie's up in the dormitory. 
Jamming the boys full of wind. 

When it C(5mes to chewing the rag, 
He has 'em all skinned. 

Chief Engineer Murphy is somewhat of :i 
joslier himself. If he persists in joshing the 
writer wt 'II hale him into court and mulct 
him in heavj damages. 

Schuberl of fireboat I has taken a contract 

to saw up all the old i demned piles laying 

around the Harrison sireel wharf in order to 

get iii lition for the coming tug-of.war 

on flu' 26th of this month. 

Captain Mike Hannan of engine 34 has a 
line bunch "f "fish air" Mr.- fighters, 



calls them. The writer spent an interesting 
half hour discussing various topics, especially 
fire matters, with him, Wednesday. 

Captain Schulz's idea of having a good time 
during vacation is to hire a horse and buggy 
in some small town and drive around until he 
gets tired. Get up, there! 

Cadigan of engine 43 one day last week 
cosnulted a Gypsy fortune teller. She told 
him, "The lady you are to marry will be mar- 
ried twice. Her second husband will be much 
handsomer than you; a man of simple tastes 
and refined habits, with the manners of a 
courtier." 

Engineer Kinney of fireboat 2 writes us as 
follows: "I have often found just what I 
was looking for in the PACIFIC FIREMAN. I 
am to he married soon and will wear my 
honeymoon suit in place of my usual Sunday 
suit. Do I wear gloves during the marriage 
ceremony? 
know. 



Ask your captain; he ought to 



Lieut. Kehoe went into a barber shop, 

Around the corner from truck 5 place; 
The barber must have had a drop, 

For he very badly cut his face, 
And when he saw his face was cut, 

With all his might and main, 
He soused him with witch-hazel, 

But it did not stop the pain. 

Frank Smith of truck 2 dropped a nickel 
into a multi-phonograph at Malabi's Italian 
restaurant on Front street one day last week 
to hear an Alexander ragtime played; but 
the ragtime didn't mature, and calling a 
waiter told him he wanted rag time. "Me 
no gotta rag; gotta soupa, roasta beefa, 
roasta porka. What you wanta?" said the 
waiter. 



Battalion Chief Maxwell attended a musical 
affair one evening last week where only patri- 
ot i,- airs were played, when he arose, saying. 
Hoot, Mon! 'tis ickle strange we canna hae 
"Blue Bells of Scotland " Another blooming 
fire-fighter in the hack of the hall jumped to 
his feet and cried, "Aw, let's have "Every- 
body's Doing It." After 1 the commotion had 
subsided the professor at the piano played 
something soft and shivery. 

John J. Moholy, one of the most popular 
machinists at the corporation yard, was 
united in marriage to an estimable young 

la.lv of Sacramento this week. May happi- 
ness and prosperity he their lot for years to 
come is the expressed wish of the Pacific 
Fireman. It is reported thai ho passed oul 
a box of tine cigars to • uerj man iii tin- yard. 

It is SHI. I that Bulger done the "pBS8ing" and 

cribbed two or three out of each box. 



Teltphone DouaUi 1255 

U. J. BORCK, IHI ™ L «« 

MAKF.S A SPECIAI n "I 
l-IUKrVIRIN'S '. " UrNIHOU'MJS 

ALSO FINE CIVILIAN SUITS 
93 EDDY STREET San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given l" H'« ddino <"'<i Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decoration* and Designs. 

Gardening, Etc 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Reach Nurseries, take Castro street car to 23rd. or 

Mission, 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



Phone Home J 2549 

EM1L SCHOENBEIN 

Fireman Cap Maker 

Formerly of 21st and Folsom 
...WILLIAMS.-. BUILDING... 

THIRD STREET 



Cor. Mission. Room 307 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Lamanet Bros. 



Telephone 
Home C 24ift 



Is the place of all places to get ihe very latest and best in the way of 

Firemen's R, igulal Ion Shirts, 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

Hats and Underwear, Etc. 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 
NA/M. F. EGAN 

M. R. C. V. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D 



1155 GOLDEN GATE AYE. 
Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 

M L MILCOVICH. Prop. 

Martin's Restaurant and Grill 

1533 STEINER STREET 



Telephone Douglas 287 I 



Home C 4992 



Meeting of Veteran Firemen's Association 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
Veteran Firemen's Association of San 
Francisco was held in their headquar- 
ters, 368 Fell street, Tuesday, May 7, 
President John S. Farley presiding. 
All of the officers, directors and a 
large number of members answered 
roll call. The charter, regalia and 
paraphernalia of the association was 
ordered draped in mourning for a pe- 
riod of 30 days in respect to the mem- 
ory of our deceased comrades, John 
Hayes and Wm. F. Miskel. Comrades 
Bell, Mooney, Mahoney, McAdoo and 
Drummond still on the sick list. Four 
applications for membership were re- 
ceived and two new members ad- 
mitted. Bills to the amount of $165.75 
was ordered paid. The Picnic Com- 
mitree reported progress and turned 
in $505.60, partial proceeds. The 
Uniform Committee reported progress 
and requesting that all members de- 
siring uniforms pay into the Uniform 
Fund the first payment of $10 at the 
next meeting, Tuesday, June 4. A 
committee of five, viz: Comrades 
Britt, Hensley, Winters, McKenzie 
and Cox was appointed to revise the 
constitution and by-laws. Under the 
proper head of business several stir- 
ring speeches were made in advocacy 
of the necessity of having a uniform. 
The City Beautiful, the Panama Pacific 
International Exposition 1915, etc. 
The members were ordered to assem- 
ble at Laurel Hill Cemetery on Thurs- 
day, May 30, Memorial Day, to strew 
flowers on the graves of our departed 
comrades. "Memoria in Etema." 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



The telephone .. print. .is in New York City 
handle L80, ) calls every rush hour They will 

...line, i you with any oue of 500, SUDS' I < 

In half a minute- 
Ask 11 KChange manager how he can handle 

all these i ills, and hi will tell you tersely. "Hy 
saving the sei 

..i.ii. time' 
industry. That means Howard timi 

always some Ij higher up holding a Howard 

Watch .a. the Job demanding the Howard type 

■ a i ... and punctuality. 

The Howard is i itch in the world 

wholly adapted to modern pi 

■ . else const rui tion and thi ■ i 
lustmi 

A Howard Ws ch is always worth what you 
pay for it- ,. . 

ii., price "f each watch— from the l. -jewel 
(double roller) in a Crescenl Extra or .la> Bo 
Extra gold-filled case at M0, to ye] at 

[150 and the Edward Howard model at - 
is fixed at the factory and a printed ticket at- 
tached. , 

Find the Howard jeweler in your town 

talk to him. Not every Jewell 

Howard. The jeweler who can Is a g 1 man 

t" know, ,..., . , 

Admiral Si written a little 1 k. 

■The l ' Howard Watch," 

,.f his own Howard in the U, S Navy. 

You'll enjoy it. 1 ' "' N 

.....v 

HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston, Mass 

T. H. KILQO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 

71 WALLER ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 



Victor Victrolas 



Columbia Grafonolas 

Victor and Columbia Records 
Inventigate Our New Club Plan 

KOHLER & CHASE 

26 O'FARRELU STREET 



WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRANT BROKERS 

030 KEARNY STREET 

COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Merrilt -4447 



H. G. WILLIAMS 



Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 



1248 Thirteenth Avenue, Oakland 



PACIFICFIREMAN 
JOB DEPARTMENT 

IS NOW PREPARED TO PRINT 
LETTER HEADS 
BILL HEADS 
INVOICES 
STATEMENTS 
ENVELOPES 
BUSINESS CARDS 
WEDDING INVITATIONS 
DANCE PROGRAMS 
PERSONAL CARDS 
SHIPPING TAGS 
BILLS OF FARE. ETC 
479 "TURK STREET 
Phone FRANKLIN 6867 



Phone Kearny 3523 



HomeC 1780 



JOE. H. ROSENBERG 

(f.iml au& iHiluarii ilatlnr 

73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 

LouU Fr.nkenberg. formerly with Rraenblum & A braham. Manner 

Home phone S 2317 

The Little Emporium 

L. RIZN1C Propiielor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 
2206-98 GEARY STREET 

Nearlirooemk 
Telephone We.l 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 



A contract has been made with the 
Gamewell Company of New York for 
a fire alarm system for Sacramento. 
Theirs was the only bid offered and 
some of the council opposed it on this 
ground. The cost is to be $56,406. 




VOL. IX. -NO. 21 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, MAY 25, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



The Most Successful Now 
in Existence. 



Thursday, May 16th, Henry A 
Campbell, engineer of the Chamber 
Commerce of this city, in an address 
before that body, stated that "San 
Francisco's new high-pressure water 
system, even in its present incomplete 
state, is the biggest and best-equipp- 
ed system of its kind in the United 
States." 

Continuing, Mr. Campbell said: 

"The people of San Francisco made 
a wise choice when they voted a 
$5,000,000 bond issue for the construc- 
tion of a system designed to substitute 
protection for indemnity, prevention 
for loss. Under the old system of 
fighting fires by means of steam fire 
engines, the insurance premiums paid 
annually by the citizens of San Fran- 
cisco amounted to $5. 000, 000, or nearly 
half as much as the entire tax budget 
for all other forms of protection and 
city government. 

"The saving of only 10 per cent in 
premiums will not only pay the cost of 
maintenance and the interest on the 
bonds, but provide a sinking fund 
which will wipe out the entire indebt- 
ness in a very few years. In the 
meantime the city will have a degree 
of protection never before enjoyed, 
while the saving in property loss and 
in the losses incidental to a high Bre 
risk are beyond computation." 

The fire loss in San Francisco from 
1891 to 1904, Campbell said, amounted 
to more than $13,000,000, or an average 
of over $1,000,000 a year. The fire 
loss per capita in San Francisco dur- 



ing 1905 was $2.50, while the per 
capita loss throughout the entire 
United States was $2.47 against 47 
cents in Paris, 49 cents in Germany 
and 12 cents in Italy. The difference, 
he explained, is due to the different 
type of construction allowed here and 
abroad and the prevalence of frame 
buildings here. 

"A little water right away means 
more in fighting a fire than many 
times the amount applied after the 
loss of of a few minutes," said Camp- 
bell. "The system adopted— that of 
static supply from reservoirs — is by all 
means the most desirable. The sys- 
tem as constructed is capable of de- 
livering on a given 100,000 square 
feet — the equivalent of a block in the 
fifty-vara district— 15,000 gallons per 
minute, sufficient to cover the entire 
block with over a foot of water inside 
of an hour. This is double the capa- 
city of all the fire engines in use in 
the city." 

The system will be earthquake proof 
and will have, when completed, nine- 
ty-one and a half miles of extra heavy 
castiron pipe and 1140 hydrants, and 
will afford protection to an area of 
5300 acres, or eight and two-tenths 
square miles. A private telephone 

in, with 395 stations, will i ul the 
whole under the direct control of the 
lire chief at all times. 

As compared with the high-pr< ssure 
system! in New York and Philadelphia, 

the San Francisco System has the ad 

vantage of gravity press ure as againsl 

pump pressure and will afford prolee- 
i ion to an area t hree time as large a 
that included in the New York system 
ami ten times as large a: t ha! of Phi- 



ladelphia. The comparative cost per 
acre is as follows: San Francisco sys- 
tem, $1130; New York, $2763; Phila- 
delphia, $1367. 

Victimizing Firemen's Friends. 

No part of the country seems to be 
immune from the enterprising gentry 
who try to collect money from mer- 
chants and others on the false plea 
that the proceeds are to benefit fire- 
men's relief or pension funds. In 
Massachusetts a history is being com- 
piled of the Fire Chiefs' Club and ad- 
vertisements were sought on the plea 
that the revenue would go into the 
club's treasury, which was absolutely 
untrue, as Chief Mullen of Boston 
promptly took measures to inform the 
public. 

In California men are seeking sub- 
scriptions to an alleged publication, 
the name of which is said to be "Cali- 
fornia City Fireman," and their plea 
in the cities they canvass is that the 
subscription money will go to the local 
firemen's pension fund a claim to- 
tally without foundation. It is proper 
to say. as a warning to our California 
readers who may be troubled by these 
canvassers, that so tar as we know, 
there is 110 Such publi* ul ion as the 

"California City Fireman;" we have 
never seen a copy of it; we have never 
heard that such a periodical existed, 
and the directoi iblici I ions do 

not list it. Fin man's II 

Assistant i hief Chat . S. Wilder of 
■ ville (Ind.) won a fine aut< mo- 
bile in a newspaper voting 
held there recently. As n nor 

Chief 1'. S. < Irani I ad an automobile, 
it will corr.e in \ erj handy. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



pAciff 




IREMAN 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G PRESTON Business Manager 



Editorial Rooms and Business Olhce, 479 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 



Entered as second-class matter March 21, 1908, at the 
Postothce at San Francisco, Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 



SATURDAY MAY 25. 1912 



Within the next six months the department 
will have about fifteen pieces of auto appa- 
ratus in service, and forty horses less will be 
required than at present. 



The key to the recent Civil Service exami- 
nation for firemen in the San Francisco Fire 
Department were taken bodily from the Book 
of Rules, with few exceptions. 

The Gorham Engineering Company, Inc., 
received a cablegram from the Honolulu 
Fire Department ordering three Seagrave 
automobile chemical engines this week. 

There are two many persons allowed inside 
the fire lines while a fire is in progres. The 
Fire Commission should adopt some method 
to keep out only those who have business in- 
side the lines. 



President Brandenstein announced at Thurs- 
day's meeting of the Board that the Finance 
Committee of the Board of Supervisors had 
allowed the department $50,000 for automo- 
bile apparatus for the next fiscal year. 

To put a quietus on "ringers" in the de- 
partment the Civil Service Commission has 
practically decided to use the thumb print for 
identification of applicants. In adopting the 
thumb print it will be used by the Commis- 
sion in the physical, mental and final tests in 
order to insure the Commission against sub- 
stitution. 

Fire Chief Louis C. Dingman of the Manila 
Fire Department, accompanied by his wife 
and daughter, arrived in this city this week. 
It is his first visit in fourteen years. Since 
his arrival he has taken great interest in 
motor fire apparatus and will visit Los Ange- 
les and other coast cities for the purpose of 
getting data, with a view of motorizing his 
department on his return. After his visit on 
this coast he will tour many of the Eastern 
cities and attend the Fire Chiefs' convention 
at Denver, Sept. 17-20, returning horn,, bj 
Way of Suez canal. He was an honored guesi 
of Chief Engineer Murphy and Charles A. 
Taber of the Gorham Engineering Company 
during the week. 

To Take Legal Action. 

During July, 1910, the city of Oakland 
placed with the Gorham Rubber Company an 
order for an automobile fire engine, which 
was to be manufactured by the Nott Fire En- 
gine Company of Minneapolis, Minn. After 



waiting for the delivery of the engine till 
now, or nearly two years, the city of Oakland 
has been compelled to take legal steps to pro- 
tect its interests before the statute of limita- 
tions intervenes, therefore has notified the 
Nott Fire Engine Company of Minneapolis, 
Minn., of its intended action. 

Many people, who are more or less inter- 
ested in fire department matters, and who are 
not familiar with all the circumstances, be- 
lieve that the legal steps being taken bv the 
city of Oakland have to do with the order 
placed by that city late in 1911 for a Gorham 
auto pumping engine manufactured by the 
Gorham Engineering Company, Oakland. 

The Gorham engine will be delivered within 
sixty days from date and no action of any 
nature has been taken by the city relative to 
that order. 



Test of High Pressure System. 

Two practical tests of San Fancisco's high 
pressure svstem were given last Sunday af- 
ternoon to demonstrate its efficiency under 
the supervision of Chief Engineer Murphy, 
with most satisfactory results. 

Following the demonstrations the chief said: 

"There was nothing official in the test. It 
was only a partial test at the best, and I made 
it for my own purposes, to find out just how 
the system is going to develop. It's great, 
even beyond my expectations, and it is going 
to be a great asset to San Francisco, for it 
will prove itself far superior to the Spring 
Valley system." 

The tests were witnessed by Superintendent 
of Engines Birmingham, Inspector Beckett of 
the Poard of Works and hundreds of inter- 
ested spectators. 

San Francisco Fire Commissioners 



REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE. 

San Francisco, May 23, 1912. 

To the Honorable. Bo id of Fire Cormni-tioners. 

Gentlemen: Your Administrative Commit- 
tee respectfully submits the following report 
on matters that have come before it for con- 
sideration since the last regular meeting of 
the Board, together with its recommendations 
for action thereon, as follows: 

Communication from A. B. Nelson, M. D., 
stating that Wm. F. Fields, truckman truck 
3, is still under his care convalescing from an 
operation for appendicitis. Filed. 

Communication from A. Isaacs, lieutenant 
engine 5, making application for fifteen days' 
leave of absence, with pay, on account of 
sickness. Recommended for approval. 

Communication from James J. Haffenger, 
hoseman engine 32, making application for 
fifteen days' leave of absence, without pay, 
from June 1, in order to enable him to visit 
relatives in the southern part of the state. 
Recommended for approval. 

Communication from the superintendent of 
engines, addressed to the chief engineer, sub- 
mitting the names of H. E. Iberg, B. A, 
Davis and D. J. Byrnes, watchmen at the cor- 
poration yard, who were appointed in Decem- 
ber, 1909, from the civil service list, whose 
positions were abolished in February, 1910, 



and who were restored to their positions in 
February, 1912, asking that they Be allowed 
the usual annual vacation. Recommended 
for approval. 

Communication from Martin T. Gallagher, 
tendering his resignation as a member of re- 
lief engine 4, to take effect from and after 
May 18. Recommend that it be accepted. 

Communication from the Civil Service Com- 
mission, stating lhat they have requested an 
opinion from the city attorney as to the legal 
status of Thos. F. McLaughlin as a brass 
finisher, and pending such opinion they have 
allowed Mr. McLaughlin to waive appoint- 
ment as hydrantman. Filed. 

Communication from the chief engineer, 
reporting the suspension of Walter Dougherty, 
hoseman engine 40, for failing to pay a just 
debt contracted for auto hire in 1910, and his 
subsequent re-instatement upon his showing 
that he had paid the debt referred to. Re- 
commended for approval. 

Communication from Joseph McDonald, 
driver engine 38, making application for 
salary during disability, caused by a horse at 
the department stables stepping on and brus- 
ing his foot quite severely. Recommended 
for approval. 

The following is a calendar of matters 
presented to the Board of Fire Commission- 
ers May 23, Commissioner Dillon absent: 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Matter of imposing penalty on George E, 
Gibiin, hoseman engine 21, for absenting him- 
self from duty without permission on March 
29 and 30. Laid over. 

Matter of hose specifications, calling for 
5.000 feet H-inch, 5,000 feet 3J inch and 
10,000 feet 3f-inch hose. 

Reprentatives of the Goodyear Rubber Co., 
Bowers Rubber Co., Eureka Hose Co., Gutia 
I'ercha Rubber Co. and Mr. Locke of the Pa- 
cific Municipalities entered objections against 
the specifications submitted for fire hose. 
One manufacturer refused to state wli^lli* r 
he would bid or not; the other three positively 
refused to bid under the specifications. 

NEW BUSINESS. 

Trial of A. F. Butterly, truckman truck 3. 
for being under the influence of liquor on 
May 9, while on duty. Suspended for six 
months. 

Trial of Peter Horan. hoseman engine 10, 
for being under the influence of liquor while 
on duty May 6. Suspended for three months. 

Resolution requesting the Civil Service 
Commission to certify eligibles for various 
positions in this departmeet for the month of 
June, 1912. Adopted. 

Resolution appointing seven firemen in this 
department, duly certified by the Civil Ser- 
vice Commission from their eligible list of 
firemen. Adopted. 

The following were appointed to be assign- 
ed by the chief: J. F. Schon, J. L. Vissard, 
W. N. Strickler, T. P. Malley, E. D. O'Neill, 
W. J, Noland and J. Howard. 

Resolution inviting sealed proposals for 
furnishing automobiles and electrical supplies, 
etc., for the fiscal year 1912-13. Adopted. 

Communication from John T. Lahey, lieut. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



engine 18, making application for leave of 
absence for one year, commencing May 26. 
Extension of 15 days. 

Opening of bids for motor-driven hose ten- 
ders, in accordance with resolution passed 
April 29, 1912. 

Bids were opened for automobile hose ten- 
ders and auto tractors, as follows: 
Gororham Engineering Company- 
Hose tenders with extras $7,210.00 

Tractors 6,870.00 

Consolidated Car Company — 

Hose tenders with extras 7,611.00 

White Company- 
Hose tenders with extras 8,233.20 

Tractors 8.164.05 

Chassis 8,664.05 

Taken under advisement. 



Answers to Questions in Recent Civil 
Service Examination. 



With full credits in the physical test, the 
following answers would have resulted in a 
100 per cent rating: 

GENERAL KNOWLEDGE OF DUTIES. 

I. In no case shall men on watch leave 
their post of duty on apparatus floor until re- 
lieved, except in case of fire. If not relieved, 
the captain shall be summoned and advised of 
the fact. 

II. Drivers shall take proper care of their 
horses; exercise the greatest caution in their 
care and management; keep stalls clean and 
see that everything pertaining to their de- 
partment is in perfect order and in readiness 
for immediate service. They shall exercise 
horses one hour each day when the horses have 
not performed any work after 1 o'clock a. m. 

III. Can he fought on land, by shore com- 
panies usin^- ordinary hydrants, high pressure 
hydrants and cisterns. From the bay it can 
be fought bj city fire boats "David Scannell" 
and "Dennis T. Sullivan," and state fireboats 
"Governor Mark ham" and "Governor Irwin." 

IV. On returning from a run, the appara- 
tus will be left outside of the house, horses 
blanketed and the running gear thoroughly 
washed with a small hose. Companies with a 
yard may wash their apparatus therein. 

V. Members of the department shall not 
enter saloons or places where liquor is sold 
while wearing their uniform or while on duty, 
except in the legitimate di.-e-i rge of their 
duty. No intoxicating beverages shall be 
brought into, kept or chunk in or about the 
houses or premises of the department, and 
any member or employee, who, vv hite on duty, 
or n bile in uniform, or when about the premi- 
ses of ill" department, becomes intoxicated, 
or who absents himself from dutj because of 
drink, shall be subject to di missi I, or ui I 
oi her penali v si i he Board of Pire Commis- 
sioners, .,i ter 1 1 iul, may impose. 

VI. All members and employees of thede- 
partmenl shall promptly pay their just and 

lawful debts, i tracted or incurred while in 

i he en i :e Failure i" do so will !»■ con d 
ered cause for suspension or dismissal. 

VII. Main Posl Office, N. E cor. Seventh 
and Mission streets; Coliseum, Baker Btreet, 
between Oak and Fell; Columbia Theatre, S. 



W. corner Geary and Mason streets; Hotel 
St. Francis, N. W. corner Powell and Geary; 
NewCity Hall, Market street, between Eighth 
and Ninth; Merchants Exchange, California 
street, between Sansome and Montgomery; 
Main Building Home Telephone Company, 
Grant avenue, between Sutter and Bush; 
Main Building Pacific Telephone Company, 
Bush street, between Kearny and Grant ave- 
nue; Lane Hospital, S. E. corner Clay and 
Webster streets. 

VIII. Motor-driven apparatus. 

IX. Installation of auxiliary high pressure 
water system; building of new fire cisterns 
and fireboats. 

WRITING REPORT. 

Handwriting 20, Spelling 20. Answer to 
1—20 points, if based on speed of 10 miles per 
hour. 

Location of engine (answer to be based on 
distance traversed.) Engine from nearest 
house assumed to have hydrant at Fourth and 
Market streets. Engines from more distant 
houses ranged on Market street or Fourth 
street in order of distance, 5 points. Progress 
through smoke-filled halls and stairways, 
knowledge of ways of avoiding effects of 
smoke, 25 points. Rescue of insensible men 
from fourth story, 30 points; fair 15, poor, 10. 



1 



84956 

7 0508 

679648 
4247800 
5946920 
5,980,077,648 Answer. 

32)64128(2004 Answer. 
64 
128 
128 

940303 
275849 
664453 Answer. 

60 

60 

360(1 
24 
11 100 
7200 
86400 Answer. 

29 days in last January $120 Salary 
$ 3 daily expense 87 Expenses 

87 total expense $ 38 Saved 

2)17(1 

85 

5 



$125 


Answer. 


5) 


726 






I i i 


i 195(11 
US 
US 

1 15 



All H 



L2 

:> 

108 
8 

864 Answer. 



Around the Bay. 

[Special Correspondence.] 

The Oakland commissioners ordered plans 
drawn for the erection of three new fire 
houses. These are located in the outlaying 
districts and will cost approximately $15,000. 

The Oakland commissioners have awarded 
the contract for the extension of the high 
pressure system. The line will be extended 
from Washington to Market along Fourteenth 
street. The contract calls for the expendi- 
ture of $11,465. 

A fire which resulted in the loss of $40,000 
worth of property, partly covered by insur- 
ance, brought the Oakland department out at 
5 o'clock Sunday morning to Fifth and Henry 
streets, and after a stubborn fight the men 
managed to save half the block. Fireman 
Silva was badly burned while fighting the 
flames. 

Although the bonds voted on to purchase 
new auto apparatus for the Alameda depart- 
ment failed to carry, it is very likely that in 
the near future gasoline tractors will be pur- 
chased and used instead of horses. A local 
manufacturer offered to build a tractor for 
$800; this is only $300 in excess of a good 
team of horses. The contractor says therear 
will be supported by the present front wheels 
of the present apparatus. No rear wheels 
are on the tractor, the front wheels of the 
apparatus doing the double duty of support- 
ing the front of the wagon and the rear of 
the tractor. On the front wheels of the 
truck will be fitted automobile sprockets, 
which will receive the chain from the driving 
sprockets of the tractor. The fifth wheel 
will remain, the whole aaparatus turning on 
this. This tractor has the approval of Chief 
Krauth and the Fire Commissioners, and in 
the event of acceptance work will be begun 
immediately. 

Los Angeles Fire News. 

Mayor Alexander has reappointed A. J. Eley 
as fire chief for a year. Eley'a leave of ab- 
sence as a captain of the department has ex- 
pired, and with the appointment the mayor 
sends a request to the Civil Service Commis- 
sion for an extension, so the chief may retain 
his standing undi r the civil service, while act- 
ing as an appointee of the mayor. 

Chief Eiey asked the commission to approve 
his request to the I itv Council Tor an appro- 
priation of $500 for the purpose of entertain- 
ing the Pacific Coast convention of Fire 
Chiefs, which is to meet in Los Angeles in 
September. The commission approved the 
n quesl 

The Fire Commission approved Chief Eley'a 
appointment of volunteer 6re companies at 
San Pedro and T« rminal I. -land, a! Alice 
street and Cypress avenue, and a1 Hollywood 
The volnnteer enmpi ny thai was maintained 
at Vincenl College tract has been disbanded, 

Tl mmissii n n ceii ed b let! er from M. 

H. Flint, head nf the Shriner Fiesta commit- 
tee, thanking the Hitmen For their participa- 
tion in t lie parade and com injr 1 hem 
on the wonderful ai d artistic displays made 
by th<> vrrinus companies. 



i.iii ! ■ la l i 

U. J. BORCK, I HE TAILOR 

MAKES PEC1 \l 1Y OF 

FIREMEN'S . UNIFORMS 

ALSi i //./ l.V SUITS 

93 EDDY STREET San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and borjuets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and (lowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening, Etc. 

TELEPHONR MISSION 1S53 

To Reach Nurseries, take Castro street car to 23rd. or 

Mission, 24th street and Hoffman avenue ear 

to Douglass and 2-lth streets. 



PI,™—} 150 "" 1 " ■ ,934 
Hhone. , Home c 2g42 



Pho, 



I Weil . 586 
'iHomeS 3174 



Serveau Bros. 

FLORISTS 

128 POST ST. 21 10-21 14 FILLMORE ST. 



Phone Home J 2549 

EMIL SCMOENBEIN 

Fireman Cap Maker 

Formerly o( 2 1 si and Folsom 
. . . WILLI A MS.-.B UILDING . . . 

THIRD STREET 

Cor. Mission. Room 307 SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone 
Home C 24 3 B 



Lamanet Bros. 

Is [he place of all places to get ihe very latest and best in the way of 

Firemen's Regulation Shifts, 
Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

Hats and Underwear, Etc. 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



\A/M. F. EGAN 

M. R. C. V. S. 

..VETERINARY SURQEON TO S. F. F. D 



1155 GOLDEN GATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 

M. L. M1LCOVICH. Prep. 

Martin's Restaurant and Grill 



1533 STEINER STREET 



San Francisco 



Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Apent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue, Oakland 



The Best Friend. 

I am the best friend I have got; I like 

to sit with Me; 
I like to sit and tell Myself things 

confidentially. 
I even stop and ask Me if I shouldn't 

or if I should. 
And find that My advice is always 

pretty good. 

I never got acquainted with Myself 

till here of late, 
Just found Myself a bully chum! 

Since then it's simply great. 
I talk with Me; I walk with Me; I 

show me right from wrong; 
And really, now, you'd be surprised 

how well we get along. 

I never try to cheat myself; I'm hon- 
est as can be; 

No matter what may come and go, 
I'm on the square with me. 

Its great to have a pal — that is, one 

that is all your own; 
To be such company for yourself 

You're never left alone. 

You'll try to shun the masses and 

you'll think the crowd a joke, 
If you treat yourself one-half as good 

as you treat other folk; 
I've made a study of Myself; have 

compared Me with quite a lot. 
To reach this one conclusion — I'm the 

best friend I have got. 



THE 
PACIFIC FIR EM AN 

JOB DEPARTMENT 

IS NOW PREPARED TO PRINT 

LETTER HEADS 

BILL HEADS 

INVOICES 

STATEMENTS 

ENVELOPES 

BUSINESS CARDS 

WEDDING INVITATIONS 

DANCE PROGRAMS 

PERSONAL CARDS 

SHIPPING TAGS 

BILLS OF FARE, ETC 

479 TURK STREET 
Phone FRANKLIN 6867 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 

The telephone operators in New York City 
handle 180,000 calls every rush hour. They will 
connect you with any oue of :•<>". I subscribers 

in half :t minute. 

Ask the exel ■ agi r how tie ca q ha. 

all tii ; rnd he will tell s im ' tei 

saving the seconds." 

"Schedule time" is the keynote of Amerl 
Industry Thai means Howard time, Then 
always somebody highei up holding ■< Howard 
Watch 'in thi tiding 1 he Howard 

i iracj and punctua lit;- - . 

The Howard is the one watch In the world 

wholly adapted to i U rn progri it has 

the precise construction and the scientific 
justment. 

a Howard Watch is always at you 

pay for it. 

The price of each watch- from the 17-Jewel 
(double roller) in a Crescent Extra 01 Jas 
[■:■■ n-.i gold-filled case at $40, to I he ! 
$150, and the Edward Howard model at $350 - 

is fixed at the factory and a printed ticket at- 
i 

Find the Howard Jeweler in your town and 

... him. Not evi cat ell you a 

Howard. The jeweler who can is a good man 

1 ■ ■ , ! ■ ■ I 

Admiral Bfgsbee has written a little book, 
"The Log of the Howard Watch," giving the 
record of his own Howard in the S. Navy, 
enjoy if- i Top us a poi >ept. N. 

and we'll semi you ;> copy. 
HOWARD WATCH WORKS, Boston, Mass 

T. H. KILQO 

DIAMONDS A1ND JEWELRY 

71 WALLE.R ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Kearny 3523 Home C 1780 

JOE. H. ROSENBERG 
Cttiuil anil ittUttant Sailor 

73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 
Louis Frankenberg, formerly with Rtwenblum fit Abraham. Manager 



Home phone S 2517 

The Little Emporium 

L. RIZNIC Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR .-! SPECIALTY 

1196 - 98 OEARY street 

Near Broderitk 



Telephone West 46»4 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone Douglas 287 I 



Home C 4992 



WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WA RRANT BROKERS 

--» 
630 KEARNY STREET 

COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



The Sonoma Expositor says the 
Ukiah Fire Department has hit on a 
novel idea for keeping the members 
interested and also to provide a place 
for a pleasant hour for the boys. The 
town board has given them permission 
to use the old electric light plant as a 
gymnasium and reading room and also 
donated them $100 toward lilting the 
building up. The boys are enthusias- 
tic in their work and will have very 
comfortable quarters. 





fIREMAN 




VOL. IX. -NO. 22 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, JUNE 1, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Death of Fire Chief Fred. 
K. Krauth. 



Fire Chief Krauth of the Alameda 
Fire Department was found dead in 
bed in his room in the Webb-avenue 
engine house Friday morning, May 24. 
His death occurred while peacefully 
sleeping, from fatty degeneration of 
the heart. 

The following is a biographical 
sketch of the late chief's life, from 
last Sunday's Call: 

Fred Kellar Krauth was the oldest 
fire chief in point of continuous active 
service on the Pacific coast, and was 
regarded as one of the best informed 
fire fighters in the United Stales. He 
was a vice-president of the National 
Firemen's Association and a vice-presi- 
dent of the International Association 
of Fire Engineers. Krauth had been 
at the head of the local fire department 
since its organization 35 years ago, 
and was the dean of the city officials. 

Krauth was the son of the late Fred 
K. Krauth. who established a news- 
paper in Alameda in 1S69. He was 
burn in New York city March 21, 1848, 
and was brought to California in 1851 
by his parents, the trip being made by 
the isthmus of Panama route. The 
elder Krauth brought a printing outfit 
w th him. While the party was cross- 
ing i he ist hmus by mulel ack t he na- 
tives, believing thai the bulky packa- 
ges contained treasure, took young 
Krauth and an infant sister prisoners 
.•mil held them three days for ransom. 
When a youth Krauth was associated 
with his father in conducting news- 
papers, theelder Krauth being instru- 



mental in founding the Sacramento 
Union, the Mountain Democrat in 
Placerville and the Santa Cruz 
Sentinel. 

Krauth was the president of the his- 
toric Rincon Hose Company of San 
Francisco formed in November, 1863, 
with headquarters at Beale and Fol- 
som streets. The company numbered 
among its members many men who 
later played important parts in the 
history of San Francisco. Krauth 
was also a member of the Ellsworth 
Guard Zouaves, a military company 
organized in San Francisco during 
civil war days. He was with the Sac- 
ramento fire department in 1870 and 
with the Virginia City deparmtntin 
1872. He was commissioned chief of 
the local department on Octaber 3, 
1876. Krauth'sability as a fire fighter 
was recognized. He made a close 
study of his dangerous calling and was 
one of the first to appreciate the value 
of motor driven apparatus in fire fight- 
ing. The automobile fire engine of 
the local department was the first ma- 
chine of its kind to be used in the 
United States. 

Chief Krauth was of an undemon- 
strative nature, but was firm and fair 
in dealing with men under him. He 
was a strict disciplinarian, and his 
method of conducting the affairs of 
his departmi nl was a model one. He 
was known to thousat ds of reside nts 
and was esteemed and respected by 
all. He was a member of the Califor- 
nia Society of Pioneers, the Elks, 
Knights of Pythias, Red Men, Moose 
and Veteran Firemen of San Fran- 
cisco. He was married in 1870 to 

Elizabeth I !, Barlow, whodied in 1897. 



Two daughters born of the union also 
died. His second wife was Julia Da- 
mon Bradley. 

Police CommissionerW. H. L. Hynes, 
Assistant Fire Chief Frank K. Mill- 
ington and Chief of Police John Con- 
rad have taken charge of the dead 
chief's papers and records. Mrs. 
Augusta Morgan, a sister residing in 
Santa Cruz, is the only surviving blood 
relative of Krauth. The funeral was 
held Tuesday and was largely attended. 

Assistant Fire Chief Millington, 
who has served in the department 
almost as long as Chief Krauth, will 
prebably be chosen to head the de- 
partment. 

Conscience Money. 

In a recent issue of the Knave, a 
publication of whose existence we 
were unaware of up to three weeks 
ago, speaking of the average honesty 
of people as a whole, contained the 
following: 

Even at this late day conscience 
money is being received by the South- 
ern Pacific railroad and thePalaceand 
St. Francis hotels from people who 
were here at the time of the fire and 
earthquake and did not paj their rail- 
road fares or hotel bills, in those try- 
ing times many strangers got away 
without thinking of anything bul their 
own safety. Both hotels the night I e- 
fore the disaster were crowded with 
eastern guests, The morning of the 
earthquake, with the fire thai followed, 
drove all thoughts of business from 
everj bodj 's mind. Some Few paid 
thai morning and K r "t away as best 
they could. Many others promi ed to 
send checks at SUCH time u ben the 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



hotels were able to send them state- 
ments. Both the Palace and St. Fran- 
cis people saved their books and were 
therefore able to send out bills to 
hundreds of people. In the gi-eat 
majority of cases remittances were 
promptly sent. Many people wrote 
and requested their bills, remitting 
when they received them. During 
the next two years every now and 
then checks would come in. Recently 
both hotels have received additional 
checks. The senders make no expla- 
nation for their long delay, simply 
stating they think they owe the en- 
closed amount and want to free their 
minds of the obligation. The rail- 
roads gave free tickets to hundreds of 
people on their promises to remit the 
price when they arrived home. The 
officials of the roads say the most of 
these people responded as soon as 
they reached their destinations is a 
good comment on the honesty of the 
average person. From time to time 
since then some one has been heard 
from, stating that he or she owed the 
company the sum inclosed. 

Not long ago a man wrote that for 
a long time he never had any inten- 
tion of paying. A death in his family, 
however, had changed his viewpoint 
about many things, and he could no 
longer withhold from the company 
what he rightfully owed it. 



The Wreck of the Titanic. 



The daily press throughout the 
country published various accounts of 
the greatest maritime disaster the 
world has ever known, more or less 
accurate; but in our estimation, the 
Denver Post of April 21 contained the 
most authentic and truthful account 
we have read, to which we give space, 
as follows: 

One week after the Titanic sank to 
her grave, two miles deep, causng per- 
haps 1635 deaths, a recapitulation re- 
veals the following to be the facts 
concerning the greatest maritime dis- 
:i: ter in history: 

On April 10 the Titanic, four city 
blocks long and heralded as the last 
word in shipbuilding, sailed from Liv- 
erpool for New York, can ying 2340 
passengers and crew. Among her 
passengers were: Col. John Jacob 
Astor, Major Archibald Butt. Isador 



Strauss. Benjamin Guggenheim, Jac- 
ques Futrelle, the author, F. D. Mil- 
let, artist, Henry B. Harris, theatrical 
manager, J. B. Thayer, C. M. Hays, j 
President of Grand Trunk Railway; 
W. T. Stead, editor, and other notables. 

Captain Smith was technically in 
command but he was outranked by J. 
Bruce Ismay, managing director of 
the International Mercantile Marine 
Company, which owns the White Star 
Line. 

The Titanic was equipped with every 
luxury. So much attention had been 
given to making her a floating palace 
that her pitiful lack of adequate life 
boat service went unheeded. Ismay 
was bent on establishing a record, 
and the Titanic was forced to maintain 
constantly a speed near her maximum 
of 23 knots an hour. 

Captains of the steamers Parasian 
and California wirelessed the Titanic 
that a vast ice field was in her path. 
Captain Smith thanked his fellow 
skippers for their warning, and under 
the direction of Ismay sent the big 
vessel ahead at full speed. In the 
evening Ismay and Captain Smith 
were the dinner guests of a group of 
millionaires. First Officer Murdock 
was on the bridge. 

A shock was felt at 10:30 o'clock. 
The Titanic had struck the submerged 
portion of a huge iceberg. The big 
vessel had absorbed the shock so com- 
pletely that many of the sleeping pas- 
sengers were not awakened. Captain 
Smith dashed to the bridge, and a 
glance told him that a serious situa- 
tion was at hand. The crew was di- 
rected to man the life boats and take 
off the children and women. 

There was no panic at first. Men 
joked about the great vessel's plight. 
One picked up a few pieces of ice that 
had fallen on deck and humorously 
offered them to a woman companion 
as a souvenir. Women were sum- 
moned from their state rooms and told 
to board the life boats. When the 
first life boat was being tilled the male 
passengers, firm in the belief that the 
Titanic was unsinkable. laughed about 
the skiff ride the women were about 
to take. "We'll steam over and pick 
you up in an hour or so," some one 
jokingly remarked as the little craft 
was lowered. It was not until half a 



dozen boat loads had been sent adrift 
that the gravity of the situation be- 
gan to dawn upon a majority of the 
passengers, many of whom had re- 
fused until this time to put on the life 
belts. The Titanic was sinking by 
the head. 

First officer Murdock, who was in 
charge when the crash came, placed 
his revolver to his temple and pulled 
the trigger. Several foreigners at- 
tempted to rush the life boats but were 
held back at pistol points. A few- 
were shot before their companions 
were cowed. 

The life boat supply was insufficient 
to take off half of those on board. 
One by one the lights began to go as 
the water crept higher into the vessel. 
The crew, lacking in discipline, cut 
away boat after boat leaving many of 
the seats unoccupied. 

Kansas City Two-Platoon System. 

Provided the Kansas City (Mo.) fire 
department can be conducted success- 
fully on an appropriation of $400,000 
for the municipal fiscal year and ar- 
rangements can be made foraddtional 
funds as the revenues develop, 
double platoon system will be put in 
operation June 1. Under the system, 
the hours of service of firemen will be 
reduced from twenty-four hours to 
twelve hours a day. This will neci s- 
sitate the employment of a number of 
additional firemen, but no extra offi- 
cers, as lieutenants and captains will 
alternate on night and day duty. The 
salary of lieutenants is to be ii.cn ax d 
from $90 to $95 a month. 

Mayor Jost agreed to the. plan at a 
conference with the fire and v. 
board last week, after a thorough dis- 
cussion as to where the extra funds to 
pay for it are to cone fr< m. Tie wl ole 
matter resolved itself into a n ath< n a- 
tical problem. It was shown that with 
the twelve-hour syslt m the citj could 
divert $5(1.11011 a year now paid out to 
men for days off, going to meals, va- 
cations, etc.. to help pay the salaries 
of additional firemen. By addii g 
from$35,000to$40,000tothis$50,000it 
was figured the change could be made. 
Chief Egner was directed to begin 
making arrangements immediately 
for the new plan, which is to be put 
into effect June 1. — Fireman's Herald. 



PACIFIC F1UEMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Israel Zengwill's greatest play, "The 
Melting Pot," will be Richard Ben- 
nett's second offering at the Alcazar, 
commencing next Monday night, with 
Mabel Morrison and the full strength 
of Belasco& Meyer's regular company 
aiding the star. It promises to score 
a success no less notable than that just 
recorded by "Alias Jimmy Valentine," 
for the play itself is a model of dra- 
maturgy and Mr. Bennett is excep- 
tionally qualified to give impressive 
impersonation of the central figure, a 
young Russian musician whose par- 
ents were butchered at Kischinof and 
who. escaped to America, and falls in 
love with a Christian girl who turns 
out to be a daughter of the man who 
directed the butchery. 



Empress Theatre. 

The offering de luxe at the Empress, 
beginning Sunday afternoon, is Miss 
Hazel Bess Laugenour. the first lady 
to swim across the treacherous cur- 
rents of Golden Gate straits, will ex- 
hibit her aquatic prowess to Empress 
patrons. "At the Threshold," which 
will serve to introduce one of the best 
known legitimate actors, Mr. Walter 
Law, is a play of unusual verility, 
teeming with dramatic fineness. With 
an aggregation of ponies, dogs, mon- 
keys and several ant-eaters, Mons. Del 
Franco presents a miniature circus. 
Among the many feats is "A monkey 
funeral." Mort Fox, a Hebrew co- 
median with a clear tenor voice, will 
be heard in dialect stories and severa 
corking semi-classical ballads. Em- 
press patrons will be given an oppor- 
tunity of hearing for the first time in 
America, Peppino, the celebrated ac- 
cordeonist, who has been making a 
splendid hit along the circuit. A cou- 
ple that come highly recommended 
from the metropolis are Prince and 
Deerie, who will present a singing 
and talking act,. Miss Elizabeth 
Meyers will be heard in a selection of 
popular and classical hits. Landry 
Brothers will do seemingly impossible 
tricks on revolving ropes. 

Chemical No. 2 of Fresno is being 
remodeled into a motor truck. 

A new auto truck will be added to the 
fire protection equipment ri Colton. 

_ The question of increased fire protec- 
tion For Smith Pasadena is receiving 
consideration by the city trustees. 



FOR BETTER FIRE PROTECTION 

in the: village: 

a seagrave 2-wheel hand-drawn chemical 




Gorham Engineering Company, Inc. 



SEATTLE 
216 Jackson Sheet 



SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Street 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 S. Olive Street 



American Rubber iWfg. Co. 

9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Offce and Factories — Park Avenue and Watt Street. Cal.land, Cal. 

WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 

M rhanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose, Brcss 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Department Supplies 



When You're Buyin 9 Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to f^r 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

L. H. &. B. |. BILL 

Sole Distributors for the PcclflC Coast 54.1 (inlden date Ave., San Franclaco 





PACIFIC FIREMAN 




PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRF.XTi in B usiness Manager 



Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street. 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 



Entered as second-class matter March 21, 1908, at the 
Postollice at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
press of March 3. 1879. 



SATURDAY. 



JUME1, 1912 



Ex-Chief Waters visited our sanctum one 
day this week. Call again, chief. 

The "bravest" wiped the ground with the 
"finest" at the Eagle's picnic in the tug-of- 
war, May 26. 

Jas. K. Mack, editor of the Pacific Fire- 
man, left Saturday for Oregon for a few 
week's vacation. 



Frank Cunningham, the adonis of truck 1, 
is soon to become a benedict. Congratula- 
tions are in order. 



Around the Bay. 

[Special Correspondence.] 

Fire Chief Fred K. Krauth of the Alameda 
department was found dead in his bed at his 
quarters in the Webb-avenue fire house Fri- 
day morning. His body was discovered bv 
Assistant Engineer Fred Wagner, who went 
to the chief's room to ascertain why he had 
not risen. The natural position of the body 
and I he peaceful expression of the face indi- 
cated that the chief had passed away while 
asleep. 

Chief Krauth had been connected with the 
department since its organization in 1880, 
when he was elected chief, he having served 
as chief of police for four years previous to 
1 his time. Since his election in 1880 he has 
served continuously with the exception of 
two years, when he filled the position of de- 
puty sheriff. 

Chief Krauth was a member of the Volun- 
teer Fire Department of San Francisco, and 
was a veteran fireman of that city. In 1876 
he assisted in establishing the Citizens Hook 
and Ladder Company No. 1, and was appoint- 
ed first assistant foreman of that company. 
In October, 1877, the West End Engine Com- 
pany was organized, and in November, 1880, 
the Alameda Fire Department was organized. 
This was composed of several hose companies 
and one hook and ladder company. In 1891 a 
fire alarm was installed and two 



Pumping station No. 1 is in service and 
water is in the pipe lines to supply about 100 
high pressure hydrants. 

The Seagrave chemical which had an acci- 
dent recently during the test is again going 
through a test as we go to press. 

Captain Danahy offers a reward of three 
big 25c crabs to any one informing him of the 
name of the individual that swiped his nets. 

Owing to the Fire Commissioners meeting 
being held on Friday evening, in the future 
the Pacific Fireman will be mailed on Sat- 
urday afternoon. 

Emil Schoenbein, the fire department cap 
maker, says little Tommy Murphy and Cap- 
tain Everson of engine 1 are two of the finest 
men in the department. 



Lieut. Roebling met a hobo who asked him 
for ten cents to get a bed one night last 
week. "Bring the bed around and I'll see 
about it," said the lieutenant. 

Lieut. Frank Smith and Gene Mulligan art 
candidates for director in the Widows and 
Orphans' Association. Their friends are giv- 
ing them all the support possible. 

B. K. Black, Vice-President and General 
Manager of the Seagrave Compaev is in ihe 
city and is being shown around by C. A. 
Taber of the Gorham Engineering Company. 

"What's the matter with the mi n?" si.id a 
stranger, pointing to Cadigan, whose face 
was a puzzle. "Oh, he's alright," said Cap- 
tain De Myer; "he wants to say something, 
but he shoes are too tight. 



igine'w'ere'pur- Wm - Schmalz, the Kearny street broker, 
chased. will spend his vacation at Adams Springs this 

The funeral was held Tuesday from the year. He leaves on the 15th. He states he 
Alameda Elk's Club Rooms. The pall bearers derives more benefit from Adams Springs 
were Captain Gus Wagner, Fred Wagner, 
James Delvicchio, Carl Helmstein, Captain 
Albert Reiclisrath and Bruno Steinmetz, all 



members of the department. 

Chief Krauth was one of the best-known 
men in Alameda. He had a genial manner 
and was highly esteemed by all who knew 
him. He was one of the most popular offi- 
cials in the city's service, and his death will 
he m keen loss to the department 

It is generally believed that Assistant Chief 
Frank Millington will be chosen to succeed 
ihe lace Fred K Krauth of the Alameda de- 
partment. It has been the policy of the 
Council in the past to promote the next in 
rank to the higher position left vacant, and 
he will no doubt he recommended to the 
Council by the Police and FireCommissioners. 
Second Assistant Chief Steinmetz will no 
doubt occupy Millington's position. 

Promotional examinations will be held on 
June 27th for the Oakland department. This 
examination will be held for the purpose of 
creating an eligible list from which hattalion 
chiefs, captains and lieutenants w 11 be se- 
lected to fill any vacancies that may occur. 



water than any other on the coast, 
chief?' 



"Are you feeling well, chief?" said the 
writer to Battalion Chief Wills one day re- 
cently on Market street. "Never felt better 
in my life," he replied. "Might I ask your 
aee?" "Well, I'm like a woman; I don't 
like to tell, but vou can put me down for 66," 
said ihe chief, smiling. 

Battalion Chief Cook and his friends arrived 
home safe from Maraga Valley, wherever 
that is, where they went on a hunting trip 
during the chief's vacation. It is rumored 
thev left rather hastily, as the game warden 
was hot foot after them for shooting up all 
the game in the valley. 

Hosenian Centlivre of engine 33 states it's 
not necessary to buy a chicken ranch to raise 
chickens. All you have to do is to get an in- 
cubator and fence in your back yard and go 
to it. he says. During his vacation his incu- 
bator turned out some 200 chicks, he claims. 
This puts it all over Barricks. 



The two bald-headed members of engine 24, 
H. Parks and "Bull" Collins, recently bought 
a bottle each of "Prof." Wallace's hair 
grower, on the strength of a testimonial from 
Captain Kenneally. After using the dope 
some time they lost what few hairs they had 
and now thev want to kill the professor. 

Frank Malerbi, one of the partners of the 
Malerbi restaurant on Front street, where a 
number of firemen get their eats twice a day, 
when requested by the writer to advertise, 
came back at us something after this fashion: 
"No gooda mucha beseniss; fireman eata too 
mucha, no make the mucha mon," shaking 
his head. 

Seiwert of engine 27 has been studying 
upon kissology. He says kisses are deadly 
and he's been advising Joe Feldhause to carry 
a lemon or two in his pocket when he goes to 
see his girl. But Joe says a lemon might 
help some by giving her mouth a good pucker 
for the next smack. Joe says Seiwert is 
jealous. Now, Coogan, don't josh your reliet 
engineer. 

You'd naturally think Ed. Church knew his 
way around town. He got lost on Market 
street one day this week in trying to find 
Hale's dry goods store. He finally managed 
to find it after asking two cops and an old 
lady. He had been out to the City Hall tor 
the yard money. When asked if he got it he 
replied, "I only wanted to look at it, to see H 
it was there." 

Los Angeles Fire News. 

Chief Eley has appointed Ernest Rhoades, 
Charles J. Howley and Eugene T. McGann as 
lieutenants, and these appointments were ap- 
proved by the Fire Commission. 

The Fire Commission approved the appoint- 
ment by Chief Eley of members of a volun- 
teer fire company for Gardena. The mem- 
ders are W. W. Dow. F. E. Graham, Fred 
Maddy, W. H. Wood, Peter Robertson, G. G. 
Burns, J. W. Bennett, R. H. Burbank, Earl 
Hobson, G. W. Hewzler, Wm. J. Simmons, 
Clifford Simmons, H. Linkletter, W J. Good, 
Walter Simpson, Clifford Barnes, H. O. Kich- 
wine and E. J. Hallowav. 

Only one bid was received for the erection 
of the Western avenue fire house, and this 
was so far above the $15,000 limit set by the 
Board of Public Works and the City Council 
that the fire department advised its rejection 
aud re-advertisement for bids. 

The Fire Commission approved the bill ot 
the Gamewell Fire Alarm Company, for ten 
fire alarm boxes for San Pedro, for which the 
city will pav $1527.65. 

Chief Eley was before the Finance Com- 
mittee of the City Council to ask that it allow 
his request for $5000 for the purpose of en- 
tertaining the Pacific Coast convention of fire 
chiefs. There will be at least 150 fire chiefs 
present from many points west of the Rocky 
Mountains. The Finance Committee decided 
that it could not make an appropriation, as 
the event occurs September 23 to 28, and 
would be in ihe next fiscal year, but the Bud- 
get Committee will provide for the re- 
quired $5000. _^^____ 



Phone Dounla. 382 5 Phone Home C 2996 

MALERBI RESTAURANT 

MALERBI & FRUCCLI. Prop.. 
...First Class Wines, Liquors and Cigars... 

Resulat Week Day MeaU. Noon 35 cent*. EveninB 25 cenb 
Sunday MeaU 50 cents up 

546 Front St. near Jackson San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



San Francisco Fire Commissioners 

The Board of Fire Commissioners met in 
regular session Friday evening (Commissioner 
Donohoe absent) and transacted the following 
business: 

Report of the Administrative Committee 
with recommendations: 

Communication from A. L. Saunders, tem- 
porary hoseman engine 28, making application 
to be reinstated as a member of this depart- 
ment. Recommend that it be denied. 

Communication from Patrick Cunningham, 
truckman truck 8, making application for 
transfer to driver of battery 2. Recom- 
mended for approval. 

Communication from James Bohan, stoker 
engine 19, making application for leave of ab- 
sunce for fifteen days from June 15, without 
pav, on account of illness. Recommended for 
approval. 

From Thomas Magner, captain engine 20, 
making application for leave of absence for 
thirty days from the 24th instant, with pay, 
on account of illness. Recommended for 
approval. 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
the following transfers, to take effect June 1: 
W. J. Olson, from hoseman engine 21 to hose- 
man engine 7; Laurence Masterson, from 
hoseman engine 34 to hoseman engine 23; P. 
Cunningham, from truckman truck 8 to driver 
battery 2; C. C. Racehorn, from hoseman 
engine 6 to driver engine 17. Recommended 
for approval, 

From George A. Nolan, tendering his re- 
signation as probationary hoseman in this de- 
partment, to take effect from the 23rd of 
May. Recommend acceptance. 

From Joe Altamirano, driver engine 17, 
making application tor transfer to hoseman 
water lower 2. Recommended tor approval. 

From Frank P. Mann, hoseman engine 31, 
making application for transfer to hoseman 
engine 23. Recommended for approval. 

From Battalion Chief Cook, addressed to 
the chief engineer, in regard to the rescue of 
Mrs. El wood from the bay liv Lieut, Miskel 
am] John Kearney of lire boat 1 Recom- 
mend that It be referred to the Committee 
for i lie Investigation of Acts of Valor. 

Fr.im George Davis, hoseman engine::',. 
making application for transfer to ho eman 
engine 31, for the reason thai the assignment 

wou)d Inii'; Int >arer Ins home. Heron, 

moinlen lor apii oval . 

From the Gnrham Fire Apparatus Com- 
pany, asking for tin extension of linn le 

lively of ,n\ service truck t6 Jul) 6, 1912, 

eonlr.iri fur which w ;e. awarded January I, 

1912. Recommended for approval after as 

SUr.Oiee Iron, I |,e vice pl'eslrleel :i I > li en. ,,1 

malinger uf i he Corliam Fire Appara'tu Com 
pan] ilitii no further extension of tune will 
ed for. 

From Geo W. Harris, boilermaker tit the 
corporation yard, making Application for 
salary during disability, caused by injury to 

tool w hile on duty m 1 1 orporal ion j ard 

May 15, 1912. Rec mendi it for approval. 

From Win. .1. Hers, linn . eng 20, making 



application for an extension of time on leave 
of absence on account of continued illness. 
Recommend that he be granted 30 days from 
June 1. 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that John Balleto, driver engine 27, Lieut. 
Trevitt, engine 27, and Robert Burke, hose- 
man engine 7, be given a letter of commen- 
dation and granted twenty-four hours' leave 
of absence for assisting at a fire at Gray 
Bros, brick yard when the above members 
were off duty; also recommending a letter of 
thanks to George Wormuth, Underwriters' 
Fire Patrol, for good work on his day off at 
the same fire. Recommended for approval. 

From the clerk of the Board of Supervi- 
sors, advising that Commissioner John Dono- 
hoe, by journal resolution No. 235 of ihe 
Hoard of Supervisors, has been granted 00 
days' leave of absence with permission to 
leave the state from and after May 29, 1912. 
Filed 

From Wm. P. Carolan, substitute engine 
10, making application for salary during dis- 
ability, caused by injury to leg while on duty. 
Recommended for approval. 

From M. J. Higgins, truckman truck 4, 

j making application for extension of leave of 

absence which ends on the 31st instant, on 

account of continued illness. Recommended 

that, thirty days he granted from May 31. 

All recommendations were adopted. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Matter of imposing penalty on George E. 
Gihlin. hosenmn engine 21, for absenting him- 
self from duty without permission on March 
29 and 30. Laid over. 

Matter of proposed specifications calling for 
5,000 feet of 3J-inch. 57000 feet of li inch 
and 10,0011 of 25 inch lire hose. Revised. 

Matter of awarding contracts for molor; 
driven hose tenders and tractors, bids for 
which were opened at the meeting of May 23. 
Laid over one week. 

NEW BUSINESS. 

Resolution making temporary appointments 
in this department for the month of .line. 
Approved. 

Resolution returning Ambrose A. Sullivrn, 
No. 20 on ihe eligible list of firemen, to the 
Civil Service Commission withoul appoint- 
ment, he having failed to pass I he I lee. 
el examination. Approved 

Resolul.i ippointing Win. J Harrington 

ami Norris Johnston , probationary rn.em.bert 
of the S. in Francisco lire Department. i 
provi il 

From the chief engineer, reporting the as- 
slgnmenl to duty of the lift) six eligibles re- 
rent ly appoint! d In i hi- Board as prohatioi a- 
iv nieinlr rs of t his depart tnenl ;is follow - ; 
To engine 1. I' Hiillii v; ingini 2, W. .1. 
Nolan and i'. I: Hijovi I : ei gim 3 I 
Hew ii i ; engine I. M. A Tehanej ; i nginc 0. 
.1. Quinlan, '. .1 Lavin and 'I' F < ' K ennv : 
engine 0. VV. ,\. Strickler; engine 10, I B 
Carney; i ugine 12. F. A. Mitchell; engine 1 1. 
Ivl S. Mi.nter, .1 .1 McAvoy and i 1 1 , i li im 
ensieui; engine 15, F. W. If land; eng ii 
W. F. i looper ami Mil I ael I ,ei engii 
F. V. C ber; engine 21, .1. M Keni 



engine 22, E. D. O'Neill and A. B. Butter- 
worth; engine 23, Wm. F. Vocke; engine 28, 
W. J. Glennon and J. Riddell; engine 29, G. 
L. Trapp and R. H. McDevitt; engine 30, A. 
J. Galli and F. Aekenhiel; engine 34, J. H. 
Miller; engine 35, G. A. Reed and J. H. Elrod, 
engine 39, J. V. McKenna; engine 41, F. J. 
Hughes; engine 42, W. Sweeney; engine 45, 
F. Isbell, F. J. Allen and T. E. Johnston; 
water tower 1, F. J. Phipps; truck 1, A. J. 
Landtbum and R. S. Sheehan; truck 3, J. F. 
Sehou; truck 6, J. A. Daly; truck 7, T. P. 
Malley andJ.L. Vizzard; truck 8, A. Farrow 
and W. E. Frerichs; truck 12, T. F. Keohane, 
E. P. Manning and F. S. Fava; fire boat 1, 
J. D. Fraser; fire boat 2, G. F. Schaefer, J. 
A. Dahlman, J. Howard and G. H. Murray. 
Approved. 

From the committee investigating acts of 
valor of Hoseman J. Klatt, engine 5, and 
Raymond Remy, truckman truck 2. Report- 
ing favorably on act of Klatt, his name was 
ordered placed upon the book of meritorious 
acts. No special merit in act of Remy. 

From the superintendent of engines, ad- 
dressed to the chief engineer, reporting that 
he had tested the White auto truck to be fur- 
nished this department and recommending its 
acceptance. So ordered. 

Resolution of condolence on the death of 
Fred Krauth, Chief Engineer of the Alameda 
Fire Department and formerly a member of 
the San Fire Department. Adopted. 

From the superintendent of engines, ad- 
dressed to the chief engineer, asking permis- 
sion for George Knorp, foreman machinist at 
the corporation yard, to be allowed to live in 
Kent field for 60 days, commencing June 1 . 
Permission granted for him to sleep thereand 
inn establish a resilience. 

From the chief engineer, submitting a list 
of names for temporary appointment in the 
auxiliary water supply system: Chief Engi- 
neer, George Comstock; First Assistant En- 
gineer, Chas. Durham; Second Asst. Engi- 
neer, Kohi. Johnson; Firemen, John Sisk. 
.lames Evans and Conrad Plitsch; Foreman 
Gateman, M. ,1. Murphy, assigned to pump- 
ing station 1. Approved. 

Ii was ordered thai hereafter the meetings 
of i he Board be held on Friday : 

Pasadena. 

Monday, May 27. il.e Fire I ton 

appoii ii 'l Captain A. 1. Hi Imes ol I In I la. 
koia-st reel tire company assistant chief-of. 
i he ino depui ' mi ni. i . 11 Fletchi r » us ap- 
poinl oil capl iiin al ihe I *. kola-sl reel si 
ami S. it. Horrs « as marie foreman of ihe 

i rui k, to take i he i laci of L. M 
who heroines a call man. The appointments 
ai "Imi'i IV> v ive -in: e 1. 

U. J. BORCK, "" ' ""' 

MAKI s A 5PI CIALTY OF 

I *IRI 'Ml 5IN»S UINII : ORMS 

ALSO FINE civil. I l.v SUITS 
9 I I DD\ STRI I I San I in 



thi :i ■ i i ings 

at 5:16 p. m. / 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and bociuets always on liand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention aim n to Wedding and Funeral Ordere. 

Artietio Decorations and Designs, 

Ga.rdm.imt. Etc 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Reach Nurseiues, take Castro street car to 23rd, or 

Mission. 2Jtli street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



Ph.™ i Dousla. 4934 
™»d«, Home C 2842 



P l I Wot . 586 

PhonCT i Home S 3174 



Serveau Bros. 

FLORISTS 

128 POST ST. 21 10-2114 FILLMORE ST. 



Telephone I j r% 

H ~ c ™* Lamanet Bros. 

Is the place of all places to get the very latest and best in the way o( 

Firemen's Regulation Shirts, 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

Hats mil] Underwear. Etc. 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 
\A/M. F. EGAN 

M. R. C. V. S. 

VRTERINARV SURGEON TO S. F. F. D 



1155 GOLDEN GATE AYE. 
Telephones I'ark 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal 



Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 

THE TRIPP REMEDY CO. 

GUARANTEES TO CURE 

BLOOD POISON 

In every stage 

ACQUIRED OR HEREDITARY 

RHEU MATISM 

ACUTE OR CHRONIC 

PARALYSIS ERYSIPELAS 

CATARRH SCROFULA 

MALARIA LUPUS 

DISEASES OF 
LIVER. KIDNEY AND BLADDER 
DISEASES PECULIAR TO WOMEN 

Call or Write to 

W. G. NOBLE 

Agent and Distributor 

832 Market St. San Francisco 



Advice to a Fool. 

If the world don't do exactly as you 
think it ought to do, 

Get mad; 
If you meet with opposition, get a 
toothsome rag to chew — 

Get mad; 
Get as mad as hops, and show it; 
Feed your anger, fan it, blow it; 
Pout and let the whole world know it 

Get mad! 

If the joke you tried to spring upon 
the other fellow turns, 
Get mad; 
If you get the poker's portion that in- 
variably burns, 
Get mad; 
jPlay the baby, whine and blubber 
Like the rankest sort of lubber, 
While the gamins guy and rubber- 
Get mad! 

If you step into a place and they shun 
you to your face, 
Get mad: 
Never smile and make a joke of it, or 
folks will think you dull 
Get mad; 
Turn and frown upon the lot 
Who have called you drunken sot, 
Up and give them each a swat, 
Get mad! 

If you are looking for a scrap in the 
town you're living in, 
Get mad; 
For you will find the people ready with 
their faces all agrin, 
Get mad; 
Just hand it to them left and right, 
Sail into them with all your might, 
Go to it, Pal, and end your spite. 

Get mad! —Exchange. 



L. Lagoi 



Phones Douglas 474 
Home J 1494 



J. Ghirardelli 



The New Popular 

Restaurant and Coffee Parlor 
Bakery and Confectionery 

French & Italian Cooking 
115-117 THIRD ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 

The telephone operators In New York City 

handle i^". ia11t i hour. They will 

connect you with any one of 500, 

in halt a mil 

Ask i ■ ■ ■ e managei how he can hai 

ait these calls, ami he will tell you tersely, ■■»;>■ 
saving Hi- s< ■< 

"Si ieduti time" is the keynote of Am. 1 1 

industry. Thai means Howard time Fhen - 

always somebody higher up holding a Howard 

w.ii. h on the lob di man dine ' he Howard I . pe 

ci i] acy ;"i<i puncl uallty. 

The Howard is tin- one watch in the world 
wh >iiy adapted t" modern progress it has 
the \'<- I ■ cot Jtruction ami the scientlfli 
justmenl 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pay for it. 

The price of each watch from the 17-jewel 
(double roller) in a Crescent Extra 01 Ja 
F,xtra gold-filled case at $40, t" the 2:j-jewei at 
$150. and the Edward Howard model at • 

is fixed at the factory and a printed ticket at- 
tached. , 
Find the Howard Jewelfer in your town and 
... him. Not every Jeweler i i n sell 

Howard. The jeweler who can Is a good man 

to know 

Admiral Sigsbee has written a little book, 
"The Log of the Howard Watch," giving the 
record ol his own Howard in the V, S. Navy, 
vou'll enjoy i< Drop ue d, i >ept N, 

and we'll send you a copy. 
HOWARD WATCH WORKS, Boston. Mass 

T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 
71 WALLER ST. SA N FRANCISCO 

Phone Kearny 3523 Home C 1780 

JOE. H. ROSENBERG 
(Etntl and military aaiUir 

73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 

Loui* Frank enberg. formerly with rWnblum & Abraham. Manager 

Home phone S 2517 

The Little Emporium 

L. R1ZN1C Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 
2206-98 GEARY STREET 

Near B rodent It „ 

Tdcphor.. Wd 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 



the: 
PACIFICFIREMAN 

JOB DEPARTMENT 
IS NOW PREPARED TO PRINT 
LETTER HEADS 
BILL HEADS 
STATEMENTS 
ENVELOPES 
BUSINESS CARDS 
WEDDING INVITATIONS 
SHIPPING TAGS 
BILLS OF FARE, ETC 
479 "TURK STREET 
Phone FRANKLIN 6867 



Telephone Douglas 287 1 



Home C 4992 



WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 



WARRANT BROKERS 



630 KEARNY STREET 

COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FBA v CISCO 



Phone Home J 2549 

EM1L SCHOENBKIN 



Fireman Cap Maker 

Formerly of 21st and Folsom 

...WILLIAMS.: BUILDING... 

THIRD STREET 

Cor. Mission. Room 307 SAN FRANCISCO 








'ACIF 



VOL. IX. -NO. 23 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, JUNE 8, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Autos vs. Horses. 

The following paper was read at the 
annual convention of the Utah State 
Firemen's Association, at Provo, hy 
Chief W. H. Glore of Salt Lake City : 

Remarks are often made and re- 
peated that fire is a business proposi- 
tion, based on supply and demand. 
The supply is less protection given 
against fire and without sufficient ap- 
paratus for the extinguishment of fires 
and the absence of good building laws 
and electric wire inspector, which 
means greater losses, demands of 
higher rates of insurance. Bear in 
mind, the property owners must pay 
the losses, while the insurance compa- 
nies are in fact, the trustees, who col- 
lect the premiums from the property 
owners and pay the losses to those in- 
sured. Whenever the time arrives 
that the losses are greater than the 
insurance premiums, then necessarily 
the premiums are raised. Hence, it 
is more businesslike to create expense 
to prevent fires and save loss than to 
neglect the fire department in order 
to save a few dollars, and from said 
neglect to pay many dollars for the 
losses which will most assuredly oc- 
cur. One should keep in mind thai 
when a fire once starts, no one can 
possibly know or predict when it will 
end. as the destruction is swift, sure. 
COSUy and dangerous. The general 
public makes too light of fires, beeausi 
they do not realize what loss there 
might be to property, even life, and 
fail to profit by the costly experience 
of other cities. They do not see the 
false economy of wooden buildings, 
or buildings partly constructed ol 



wood or other inflammable material. 
Just as long as this continues, just so 
long will fires occur, and a- to loss, no 
one can even surmise. Good building 
laws may seem severe to the indi- 
vidual, if he be an owner, of an old 
building. At the same time he should 
not be allowed to endanger the prop- 
erly constructed building or buildings 
of more recent date of construction. 
When a building becomes old, out of 
date, unsightly and dangerous, let it 
be condemned and razed at the earliest 
possible moment. Let there be good 
substantial building laws, nude to 
apply not only to new buildings, but 
to the old buildings as well. Let 
"fireproof" in all particulars le the 
word and the law, and then be rigidly 
enforced without fear or favor of any 
one. This, and this alone, will reduce 
fire losses, also premiums, and estab- 
lish a great factor of safety for the 
citizens. The fire danger would be 
eliminated considerably. All persons, 
whether property owners or other- 
wise, should guard against fire in all 
its forms, by a careful and systematic 
watch over the premises wherever 
they be, keep the building and yard 
clear of any rubbish or waste mate- 
rial, have it carted away and de- 
stroyed. See that steam and I ot air 
pipes have a free clearance from any 
wood. Some people, without reason- 
ing, fail to see any danger in a si earn 
or hot air pipe surrounded by wood. 
Nevertheless, they are very danger- 
ius, as the heat destroys the elasticity 
if i he wood and will soon carbonize. 
When this is done the building is 
ready for a mysterious fire. Preven- 
tion should be thorougly understood. 



Also, first aid in the extinguisment of 
fires. At a fire do not get excited. 
Use the best methods at hand, but by 
all means, call the fire department, 
and trained men will respond with all 
possible speed to check the flame or 
prevent it spreading to other property. 
The underwriters make a study of 
preventing and extinguishing fires, 
and at all times endeavor to point out 
the hazards and suggest remedies. 
And their suggestions should be strict- 
ly followed. Vigilence of the fire de- 
partment, if ever so efficient, cannot 
prevent the inevitable, if bad condi- 
tions are allowed to remain, and the 
fire department be not kept up to a 
high standard. 

Here is the approximate cost of 
maintaining one steam file engine 
(three-horse hitch) and one hose wagon 
(two-horse hitch) for one year: Five 
horses, feed, shoeing, veterinary and 
medicines, harness, repairs and re- 
placements, blankets, hauling manure, 
brushes, repairs to stalls, wiping 
towels and other incidentals, $1,438.80; 
depreciation of horses, 10 percent, 
$125; fuel for maintaining steam, $66: 
fuel for engine at fires. $120: polish, 
waste, oil and incidentals, $18; total, 
$1,767.80. Cost of motor com! ination, 
pumpand hose wagon to pel form same 
service. $250.80; possible contingen- 
cies, $246.24; total. $500.04; saving of 
auto over horse-draw n apparatus th( re- 
fore is $1,267.76. In case a city con- 
templated installing an engine com- 
pany equipped with engine and hose 
wagon, it would be worth while to 
consider in detai 1 the prol able cost of 
each. I here in dertske to make an 
estimate as to nun and salaries: For 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



the horse-drawn it would require 13 
men; estimating the salary to be $100 
per month each, would be $14,600. 
That of auto for the same service, 
seven men, same estimate, would be 
$8,400, making a saving in salaries of 
$7,200. The auto, besides, would give 
better service and less expense in 
maintenance. The further advantage 
in the auto is, that upon the arrival 
at a fire, it is instantly ready to de- 
liver any pressure desired or required. 
While with the steamer, it would re- 
quire some little delay in getting suffi- 
cient steam for fire pressure. This is 
figured on a short run. For a long 
run it would be more favorable to the 
auto. With the horse-drawn, the effi- 
ciency is less in proportion to the dis- 



advance in fire fighting apparatus. 
The two new automobile fire trucks 
ended the procession, showing the 
modern methods of fighting fire. 

At the conclusion of the parade the 
auto trucks went to the fire house, 
awaiting the call of the alarm. 

A two-story frame structure, filled 
with pitch, tar, gasoline and other 
combustible materials to make it burn 
rapidly was fired by Mayor Holbrook, 
who held a lighted torch to one of the 
door posts that had been plentifully 
sprinkled with gasoline. It was no 
sooner ignited than an explosion took 
place. Fortunately, his injuries, while 
painful, were not serious. 

Mayor Dow of Santa Monica, stood 
at the fire alarm box in Innis Place 



tance run. In Salt Lake City the runs , and sounded the alarm just as Mayor 
made frequently in outlying districts! Holbrook was hurled back from the 
average three miles. By the time burning building. 



Los Angeles Fire News. 

Bids for fire hose were submitted by 
eleven concerns, ranging from 70 cents 
to $1.10 per foot. 

The bill of theGamewell Fire Alarm 
Company for $1,527.65 has been ap- 
proved by the tire Commissioners. 

The city has authorized the pur- 
chase of a 135 horse-power Gorham 
motor-driven pumping engine at a 
cost of $10,000. 

One of Los Angeles' big fire engines 
was completely wrecked Saturday af- 
ternoon, June 1, when it collided with 
a Pacific Electric freight engine at 
Central avenue and Thirtieth street. 
The engine driver was slightly injured. 



these runs are made the horses are 
down and out. With the auto it cuts 
no figure, as it can go 75 per cent 
faster than the horses, and can re- 
turn as quickly as it went, and is 
always ready to answer other alarms. 
I might say that it never tires, and is 
at all times ready and "Johnny on the 
spot." The auto will also save ex- 
penses on both the size of lot and 
buildings over that of horse-drawn 
apparatus of at least 50 per cent., as 
a smaller house and lot, and no stall or 
forage would be required. I can fore- 



The company responded promptly 
and in about six minutes had com- 
pletely extinguished the fire. 



Alameda Fire Commissioners Do Politics 

Al Latham, a San Francisco print- 
ing house proprietor, Assistant Dis- 
trict Attorney W. H. L. Hynes and 
Frank H. Smith, proprietor of an 
Alameda restaurant, constitute the 
Alamedy Fire Commission. 



Grass Valley, Nev., wants an auto 
truck. 

Los Angeles has a volunteer hose 
company known as the "silk hats." 

Pasadena, Cal., is to have an assis- 
tant chief with a salary of $110 per 
month. 

The Fire Marshals' Association of 
North America will meet in Detroit 
July 10 and 11. 



Chico, Cal., has a new ordinance 
governing theatres, which provides 
for proper exits, fire escapes, seating 
capacity and the number of fire hy- 



tubes as well as four wheel drives, in 
the place of two wheeled chain drives 
as at the present time. These im- 



in the 
charge of the fire chief. 



will be in 



They have decided to appoint Frank 
H. Smith to the position of Chief of drants. The supervision and weekly 
the Fire Department to succeed the inspections of the various places of 

seein the future a great improvement j i a te Fred Krauth, instead of promot- amusement in the city 

in auto construction, viz.: Filled inner |j ng Assistant Chief F. K. Millington. 

This has aroused such a storm of pub- 
lic disapproval that there may be a 
demand for the resignation of the 



provements will overcome punctured board. 



tires and any interference on account 
of snow or mud. —Fire and Water 
Engineering. 



Fire Prevention Day at Venice. 

Extensive preparations were made 
for Fire Prevention Day at Venice on 
May 18. and were very successful. 

Following a luncheon at the Ship 
Cafe, a parade took place along the 
ocean front. A group of men carry- 
ing buckets led the procession. Fol- 
lowing the bucket brigade were the 
hand-drawn hose carts, the first im- 
provement over the bucket brigade. 

Next in line were several of I he 
horse-drawn carts, denoting the next 



Petitions favoring the appointment 
of Millington have been circulated and 
a mass meeting was held, at which 
the speakers denounced the members 
of the Fire Commission for ignoring 
the claims of Millington to the position 
and attempting to appoint to the office 
a man who frankly admitted, when 
he became a fire commissioner two 
years ago. that he knew nothingwhat- 
ever about the operations of a fire 
department. 

At the meeting of the Board on Tues- 



A warehouse at Benicia was on fire 
about 2 p. m. Friday, May 31, and but 
| for the timely arrival of the tug boat 
1 Crolona from the Sugar Refinery at 
: Crockett, the building and contents 
would have been consumed. The lit- 
tle boat played a heavy stream of bay 
water upon the fire and soon had it 
under control. 



San Jose, Cal.. is considering bids 
for sites for three new fire depart- 
ment buildings, two of which have 
been accepted. Bids for supplying 
two auto-combination engines, and a 
number of fire alarm boxes were laid 



over until the next meeting. The city 
day night a surprise was sprung by the electrician was instruct, d to prepare 
appointment of Walter J. Steinmetz as plans and specifications for the instal- 



•:-hief, in spite of the agitation in favor 
of Millington. 



lation of fire alarm systems in the 
Gardner and East San Jose districts. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

"The Deep Purple," next week's 
offering, was written by Paul Arm- 
strong and Wilson Mizner, and has 
the "punch'' that reaches all classes 
of theatre patrons. The leading role 
was originated and played an entire 
season in New York by Richard Ben- 
nett, and he also appeared in a revival 
of the play last winter. Ada Dwyer 
will appear in her original creation of 
Kate Fallon, alias "Frisco Kate." 
She shared leading honors with Mr. 
Bennett during the first season of the 
play in New York. Mabel Morrison 
was also in the original cast. The re- 
gular company and a number of extra 
players will complete the cast. 

Empress Theatre. 

The headline attraction at the Em- 
press, beginning with the matinee 
Sunday afternoon, will be Bessie Val- 
dare's sextet of cycling beauties. 
Their performance is characterized as 
the most spectacular in vaudeville. 
The added attraction entitled "Bill 
Jenks, Crook," will introduce to vau- 
deville for the first time Mr. William 
S. Gill, formerly a member of Henry 
Savage's play, "The Thief." Mr. Gill 
is supported by an excellent cast, in- 
cluding Grace Hopkins and Paul Pink- 
ington. A special feature will be the 
Five Musical MacLarens, four charm- 
ing little misses and a young man, in 
a musical number composed of singing 
and dancing, as well as instrumental 
music. Another musical offering, but 
one entirely different from the pre- 
ceding number, will he offeied by 
Ethel Whitesides and her three cute 
pickaninies in dances, songs, planta- 
tion humor, and various styles of Eu- 
ropean dancing. Henry and Lizell, 
billed as "The Ginger Kids," are de- 
cidedly original entertainers. G< orge 
Yeoman, the jolly jester, will enter- 
tain with stories and parodies. Orville 
Stamm, a seventeen-year-old boy Her- 
cules, will be seen in a clever line of 
acrobatics. Robert Crane, a clever 
patterpr, singing and dancing come- 
dian and the motion pictures complete 
the bill. 

The sum 1. 1' $80,000 will be spenl by 
the city of San Diego, to enlarge and 
increase the efficiency of the local fire 
department. 



FOR BETTER FIRE PROTECTION 

IN THE VILLAGE! 

A SEAGRAVE 2-WHEEL HAND-DRAWN CHEMICAL 




Gorham Engineering Company, Inc. 



SEATTLE 
216 Jackson Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Street 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 S. Olive Street 



American Rub be r Mf g. Co. 

9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories — Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 



WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 



Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose, Brass 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Department Supplies 



When You're Buyin' Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

JtM-0— -, to your motor (and your purse) to 

feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 

to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

L. H. &. B. I. BILL 

Sole Distributors for the PccINc Const 843 Golden date Ave., Son Francisco 





PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Pacific^ 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Husim'ss Manager 



Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 



Entered as second-class matter March 21, 1908, at trip 
Post office at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 



SATURDAY 



JUNES. 1912 



San Francisco Fire Commissioners 



The Board of Fire Commissioners met in 
regular session Thursday evening (Commis- 
sioner Donohoe absent) and transacted the 
following business: 

Report of the Administrative Committee on 
communications with recommendations: 

From Wm. F. Fields, truckman truck 3, 
making application for extension of leave of 
absence for two weeks from June 1, on ac- 
count of continued illness. Recommended for 
approval. 

From J. Conroy, acting battalion chief, re- 
porting the suspension of Wm. Mathison, 
hoseman engine 6, on May 28, for being un- 
der the influence of liquor while on duty on 
that date. Recommend that suspension be 
approved and charges filed. 

From Miss Florence Musto, Chairman of 
Utilities of the General Federation of Wo- 
men's Clubs asking that a fire detail be pro- 
vided at Pavilion Rink June 25 to July 5, 
inclusive. Recommend that it be referred to 
chief engineer to comply. 

From Hoseman Welch, making application 
for salary during disability, caused by injury 
received while responding to an alarm of fire 
on May 30, at 8:45 a. m. Recommended for 
approval. 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that the Civil Service Commission be re- 
quested to certify t ligibles from the firemen's 
list to fill temporary vacancies caused by 
companies being short handed from men on 
vacations, on sick leave and under suspen- 
sion. Recommended for approval. 

From the Recreation League of San Fran- 
cisco, requesting exhibition of the fire boat 
at a water carnival to be held Sunday, June 
16, at 11:30 a. m., at Black Point Cove. Re- 
commended for approval. 

From Patrick Cunningham, truckman truck 
8. making application for salary during dis- 
ability, caused by spraining ankle sliding 
down pole in response to still alarm May 22. 
Recommended that it be granted. 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that the Board of Supervisors be requested 
to take the necessary steps for disposing of 
five head of horses recently condemned; also 
a quantity of scrap iron, rubber tires, cotton 
hose, old barrels, rope, etc., at the quarters 
of truck 7. Recommended for approval. 
From the chief engineer, reporting i ha t 



John J. Tomalty, who was suspended for a 
period of sixty days from April 1, and ordered 
transferred to another company, has reported 
for duty and been transferred to engine 35 as 
hoseman, June 1, 1912. Recommended for 
approval. 

From the chief engineer, reporting that 
Chief Dolan and a detail of fifteen uniformed 
members of the department attended the 
funeral of the late Chief Frederick Krauth, a 
former member of this department, at 
Alameda, Tuesday, May 28. Recommended 
for approval. 

From the superintendent of engines, re- 
porting that the apparatus in the various 
houses of the department has been inspected 
during the month of May and found in good 
condition. Filed. 

From Battalion Chief Britt, addressed to 
the chief engineer, reporting the suspension 
of H. Wilson, driver truck 1, for being under 
the influence of liquor while on duty at com- 
pany quarters June 1. Recommend that 
charges be preferred. 

From the Committee for the Investigation 
of Acts of Valor, reporting on meritorious 
conduct of Lieutenant Frank Miskel of fire 
boat 1, in saving a woman from drowning in 
the bay, Sunday, May 19. Recommend that 
his name be placed in the Book of Meritorious 
Conduct. 

From Joseph Canning, hoseman fire boat 1, 
making application for transfer to truckman 
truck 1. Recommended for approval to take 
effect June 16. 

From Wm. Wonderlich, hoseman chemical 
2, making application for transfer to hoseman 
engine 45. Recommended for approval to 
take effect June 16. 

All recommendations were adopted. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Matter of imposing penally on George E. 
Giblin, hoseman engine 31. for absenting him- 
self from duty without permission on March 
29 and ,50. Laid over. 



asked to recommend a man from the eligible 
list of firemen. 

John T. Lahey, lieutenant of engine 18, 
was granted a year's leave of absence with- 
out pay with a proviso that he shall forfeit 
all claim to a pension should he be injured 
outside service. 

Trial of Wm. Mathison, engine 6, for being 
under the influence of liquor while on duty 
and failing to respond to an alarm of fire. 
Laid over. 



Battalion Chief O'Brien spent Memorial 
Day in Petaluma with old friends. 

Chief Dolan is losing his interest in horses 
since he has taken to the buzz wagon. 



Snorky Clayton has found the white hope 
in Leo Moran of fire patrol 1 and is looking 
around for a match. 



"Bill" Jedson of the Los Angeles Fire De- 
partment has been visiting in this city while 
on vacation. He will go to Seattle Monday. 



A. W. Cosgrove, a member of fire patrol 2 
died of consumption Tuesday, May 28, after 
seven years' service. He was buried Friday 
at Cypress Lawn. 



We all know that syphon water is good for 
hot coppers, but now it is to be used as a fire 
eMinguisher. The carbonized water is very 
effective in putting out gasoline tires. 



Gabriel Woods, a pensioner of the San 
Francisco Fire Department, now a resident 
of Alameda, is suffering from a bad case of 
blood poisoning, but is improving. 



James Bowan of engine 19 has gone to 

Ukiah to spend his vacation and fifteen addi- 
tional days on his brother's ranch. It is very 
likely he will start training his Thanksgiving 
turkey. 

busy tabulating 



The office force are very 
the bids for supplies to be purchased during 
Matter of awarding contracts for motor- the next fiscal year. There are more bidders 
driven hose tenders and tractors, bids for this year than at any time in the history uf 
which were opened at the meeting of May 23. the department. 

Chief Murphy spoke in favor of the substi- — 

tution of motor-driven for horse-drawn vehi- 1 We are in receipt of a postal from Jas. K. 
cles in the department, referring to the fatal l Mack, informing us of the grand trip he had 
fire at Thirty-third avenue and Point Lobos. | **> Marshfield, Ore., and the glorious weather 

he enjoyed. He wishes to be remembered to 



"It took the battalion chief eighteen min- 
utes to reach the scene with his horse and 
buggy," said chief Murphy. "With a motor 
he would have been there in one-third of the 
time. With a fire the minutes saved at the 
beginning are what count. In this case a 
motor instead of a horse-drawn vehicle might 
have meant the saving of human life." 

The members of the commission fully 
agreed with the chief, and will, at the next 
meeting, act upon several bids which have 
been submitted for furnishing motor-driven 
hose tenders, tractors and other apparatus. 

NEW BUSINESS. 

It was decided that hereafter when a sub- 
stitute fireman is needed for temporary ser- 
vice the Civil Service Commission shall be 



all his friends in the department and regrets 
that some of them were not with him. 



It was six o'clock in the morning, when the 
tap- tap-tap on the pole bv the floor watch, 
brought everybody out of their sleep and 
called them to the duties of another day. 
The first man down the pole stepped between 
the handles of the wheelbarrow, and as he 
stooped to lift, a torpedo struck the floor 
about two feet from his head. Without 
changing his position a particle his back 
struck the ceiling and he did not take as long 
going up as he did coming down the pole. It 
seems as if the dynamite squad at 41 is getting 
very active lately. Even Chief Dolan's 
friends are entertained occasionally. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



The Los Angeles Pension. 

Details of the Los Angeles, Cal., fire pen- 
sion ordinance are in the hands of Howard 
Robertson, chief deputy city attorney, to be 
worked into an ordinance, according to the 
ideas of the legislation committee. 

An increase of $2.50 a month in the pay of 
the firemen is incorporated in the measure, 
to be deducted from the salaries in order to 
keep up the pension fund. 

The committee decided that in order to re- 
ceive the benefits from the pension fund, a 
widow would have to be married to the in- 
jured or disabled employee at least five years 
before the pension is granted. Men who have 
served 20 years continuously in the depart- 
ment and are 60 years old may be retired on 
half pay. Those who have served 20 years 
continuously and are mentally or physically 
incapacitated from work, may be retired on 
half pay regardless of age. Those disabled 
from bodily injury, suffered while in the per- 
formance of duty, may be retired on half pay. 

Death from natural causes will entitle the 
widow to receive $100 if the decedent was in 
the service one year, $200 if he was in the 
service two years and so on, the limit being 
$l,000-in case he was in the service 10 years 
or more. Under the present law there is a 
provision only for $1,000 in case of 10 years' 
service or more. If there is no widow, the 
pension will be paid to the children, if any, 
less than 16 years old. 

Death from injuries suffered while in the 
performance of duty will entitle the widow 
to one-half the decedent's salary for life, or 
until she remarries. If there is no widow, 
the children will be paid the half salary until 
they are 16 years old. 

The committee desired to include a provi- 
sion that in the three cases of disability men- 
tioned, the widow and children shall continue 
to receive the pension after the death of the 
retired employee until the death or remar- 
riage of the widow or until the children are 
16 years old. Robertson was doubtful as to 
whether the Slate law would allow the family 
to continue to receive I he pension under those 
circumstances, but if legal, this provision 
will be embodied in the ordinance. —Fireman's 
Herald. 

Around the Bay. 

I Special I lot >• pondence. 1 

Chief Kenney ol lie It rkeley Fire Depart- 
ment is after the violators of the fire escape 1 
ordinance. The violations are mostly by pro- 
prietors ol' lodging and apartment houses. 
Several Berkeley schools are also in a very 
unsafe condition in the way of fire escapes, 
as wooden escapes are shll being used. 

Out of 1 12 win. took the civil servii x- 

aminati , for positions as firemen in the 

Oakland Fire Department, only 35 passed 
with the required percentage. The successful 
candidates are as follows: Peter Barata, II. 
I). Wilkin on, .1 M Blui , C. J Heinemann, 
VV. L. Ilehm, w. 1.. Kivett, II. I. Royce, F. 
•I Sandy, II E Williams, P. B. Leahy, E, 
■ I. Hittenberger, A. 1: Maxfleld, C. I: \<< 
derson, .1. II. Burke, G. VV. Cunningham, W. 



W. Manrow, R. E. Mast, C. P. Ellegard, G. 
L. Bushwell, Charles Kroegel, J. E. Perry, 
F. J. Kelly, A. H. McKown, R. S. Silvey, 
Wm. Schramm, H. A. Kuhl, J. J. Healey, 
Edward Mockel, Jacob Shiflett, A. W. Tay- 
lor, A. W. Costa, M. A. Decker, G. W. Moller, 
H. D. Sturm, H. C. Andrews. 

Chief Walter Steiumetz of the Alameda 
Fire Department has been appointed to serve 
one year on probation, and if his record is 
good at the end of this period he will be ap- 
pointed chief permanently. Chief Steinmetz 
has resided in Alameda for many years, and 
has been in the service of the Alameda de- 
partment thirteen years. 

Here and There. 



Cannot Hold Two Positions. 



San Jose, Cal. — Bids have been advertised 
for on a fire alarm station. 

Santa Clara, Cal.— The council will spend 
$5,000 for fire apparatus. 

Pasadena, Cal. — A new brick fire house has 
been ordered erected in West Alhambra. 

Alhambra, Cal. — It isplanned to issue bonds 
for a more adequate fire fighting system. 

Santa Maria, Cal. — A new high pressure 
pump is being installed by the water company 
for fire protection. 

Seattle, Wash.— The Board of Public Works 
is calling for bids on three automobiles for 
the use of the fire department. 

PaloAltn, Cal. -The Board of Public Safety 
has authorized the purchase of 500 feet of 2i- 
inch fire hose, at a cost of $405. 

Eureka, Cal.— Chief George Cochrane re- 
commends that all paid members of the de- 
partment be required to wear uniforms while 
on duty. 

Blue Lake, Cal.— The volunteer fire depart- 
ment will arrange a program for a home talent 
performance for the purpose of procuring 
funds to purchase fire fighting apparatus 

Auburn, Cal.— Three hundred and fifty feet 
of hose has just been discarded for being de- 
fective and the city has about 1S50 feet of 
hose in good condition. It. is likely that the 
board will decide to advertise for 600 feet. 

Sunnyvale. Cat— The Fire Commissioners 
attended 'he meeting of hose company 1 last 
wei I., when the needs of thedepartmenl were 
carefully investigated. The commissioners 

have decided to held ; leting and they will 

decide whal new apparatus should beobtained. 

Larkspur, Cal. The hoys of tin- volunteer 
fire department havedecided to turn over the 
fire apparatus of the department to the eitj 

tinslees. Tile boyS feel I It; i the | pie of 

Larkspur have failed to appreciate their 
efforts, and for thai reason th^ havedecided 
tn lei the city provide means to sustain the 
departmenl and purchase the equipment 
neci ..- ary. 

Where is Captain Nichols? 
lie's mil ther i i lie beach, 

I ell his voice is out, ol' I line; 
I [e'S : I line d hi: Voc;i| Ol'ganS 

Ti \ ing lo sing to the moon. 



At a recent meeting of the Civil Service Com- 
mission the following new rule was adopted 
upon motion of Commissioner Michael: 

"Any person holding a civil service position 
under the city and county who shall, during 
his occupancy of such civil service position, 
hold or retain any other salaried office or po- 
sition under the government of the United 
States, or of this State, or who shall hold any 
other salaried office or position with the gov- 
ernment of the city and county, excepting 
the position of teacher in a night school, shall 
be deemed to have vacated the civil service 
position under the city and county and his 
name shall be removed from the civil service 
register." 

The adoption of the above rule should effec- 
tually set at rest the controversy which has 
been discussed pro and con during the week 
by the members of fire boat 2. 

Meeting of the Veteran Firemen. 

The regular monthly meeting of the Veteran 
Firemen's Association was held in their hall, 
368 Fell street, Tuesday, June 4, President 
John S. Farley occupying the chair. All of 
the officers, directors and a large number of 
members answered roll call. Comrades Bell, 
Mahoney and Mooney still sick and in "bout 
same condition as when last reported on; 
Comrade McAdoo improving and Drummond 
failing. Five applicants for membership were 
elected and one application received. Claim 
on death of Wm. F. Miskel was ordered paid. 
Bills to the amount of $154.65 were audited 
and paid. The Committees on Revision of 
Laws, Picnic and Uniform made progressive 
reports. A eulogy was delivered and a series 
of resolutions offered in respect to the mem- 
ory of Comrade Fred K. Krauth, late chief of 
the Alameda Fire Department. Received on 
account of dues, rents, picnic, etc., $241. Jo. 
Under the head of good and welfare, several 
stiring and well-timed remarks were made. 

F. C HENSLEV, Secretary. 

The Seagrave auto chemical fire engine was 
again tesled last Saturday, June 1 st , over He 
California street hills, and negotiated the 
hills in good shape After completing the 
hill climbing tests the machine was driven to 
the heach for speed test, making forij miles 
i.er hour on the lei el road of the boulevard. 

I igineer Frank Crockett of engine 20 is 
aboul one of the liveliest veterans in thi 
parimeni. In a recenl visit to his quarters 
the writer witnessed a great stunt he n 
in ;■• cending I- illmor ' tei pest hill. Hi 
noi walk, he jusl ran, mall ing bel ter t imw 
i han in. on men half his age "I'll live to 
place flower, on the graves of man) younger 
men than I am, vet, " hi 



I . 1. i I..... I louglu 1255 

U. J. BORCK, IMI ' A " "" 

\i \m s \ si-i ciaj n oi 
RIRKMI-IN'JS .' UNIFORMS 

ALSO FINE Cn ii I i \ SI i rs 
93 EDDY SIR! I 1 San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 

Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening, Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION ISS3 

To REACH Nurseries, take Castro street car to 23rd, or 

Mission, 2Jth street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



"— ; !S« 



Phone. 



I We.t . 586 
I HomeS 3174 



Serveau Bros. 



FLORISTS 



128 POST ST. 2110-2114 FILLMORE ST. 



Telephone 
Home C 2438 



Lamanet Bros. 

Is the place of all placet to get the very lateil and bett in the way of 

Firemen's Regulation Shirts, 
Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

Hats and Underwear, Etc. 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



WM. F. EGAN 

M. R. C. V. S. 

..VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D.. 



Walla Walla, Wash., Fire News. 

Geo. J. Guthridge, at the age of 12, 
was a torch bearer witli the "Tigers," 
a volunteer company of 30 years ago. 
He has been in the game ever since, 
In 1904 was made captain and at 42 
became assistant chief ; that was 
about a month ago. He has the repu- 
tation of being a fearless fire fighter. 
For 29 years he fought fire side by 
side with his chum, the late Assistant 
Chief Bob Wolfe, who died of suffoca- 
tion in a burning building last Janu- 
ary, and now Gathridge takes his 
chum's place in the depaitment. 

The city commissioners agreed May 
22 to add six regular firemen and three 
specials to the force at stations 1 and 
2 in order to meet the demands of the 
Washington rating bureau, which fixes 
the insurance rates. The putting on 
of the men will add about $5500 to the 
expenses of the department the fiscal 
year, and more than that for the next 
two years, as the salaries are increased. 
The present force is 15 men at No. 1 
and 10 at No. 2 for the summer, a 
total of 25 men. In the winter the 
force will be cut to 22 men, as the 
three extras will be used only in the 
dry season. 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



1155 GOLDEN GATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 

Phone Merritl 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue, Oakland 

THE TRIPP REMEDY CO. 

GUARANTEES TO CURE 

BLOOD POISON 

In every stage 

ACQUIRED OR HEREDITARY 

RHEU MATISM 

ACUTE OR CHRONIC 

PARALYSIS ERYSIPELAS 

CATARRH SCROFULA 

MALARIA LUPUS 

DISEASES OF 
LIVER, KIDNEY AND BLADDER 
DISEASES PECULIAR TO WOMEN 

Call or Write to 

W. G. NOBLE 

Agent and Distributor 

832 Market St. San Francisco 



Phone Douglu 3825 Phone Home C 2996 

MALERBI RESTAURANT 

MALERBI & FRUGOLI, Prop.. 
....First Class Wines, Liquors and Cigars... 

Regular Week Day Meal*, Noon 35 cents. Evening 25 cenU 
Sunday Meals 50 cent* up 

546 Front St. near Jackson San Francisco 



L. Lagomamno 



Phone. DoubIm 474 
Home J 1 494 



J. Ghirardelh 



The New Popular 

Restaurant and Coffee Parlor 
Bakery and Confectionery 

French & Italian Cooking 
115-117 THIRD ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



The telephone operators In New York City 
handle 180,000 calls every rush hour. They will 
connect you with any oue of 500,000 subscribers 
in half a minute. 

Ask the exchange manager how lie can handle 
all these calls, and he will tell you tersely, "By 
saving the seconds." 

"Schedule time" is the keynote of American 
industry. That means Howard time. There's 
always somebody higher up holding a Howard 
Watch "i! the Job demanding the Howard type 
of accuracy and punctuality. 

The Howard is the one watch in the world 
wholly adapted to modern progress. It has 
the precise const nut inn and the scientific ad- 
justment. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pay for it. 

The price of each watch— from the 17-Jewel 
(double roller) in a Crescent Extra or Jas, Boss 
Extra gold-Ailed case at $40. to the 23-Jewel at 
$150, and the Edward Howard model at |3I 

is fixed at the Factory and a printed ticket at- 
tached. 

Find the Howard Jeweler in your town and 
talk to him. N*«>t every jeweler can sell you a 
Howard. The jeweler who can is a good man 
to know. 

Admiral Slgshee has written a little hook, 
"The Log of the Howard Watch," giving the 
reord of his own Howard In the L T . S. Navy. 
You'll enjoy it. Drop us a post-card, Dept. N, 
and we'll send you a copy. 
HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston. Mais 

T. M. KILQO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 

71 WALLER ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Kearny 3523 Home C 1780 

JOE. H. ROSENBERG 

(Etuil anb fflilitary Sailor 
73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 

LouU Frankenberg. formerly with Roienblum & Abraham, Manager 



Home phone S 2517 

The Little Emporium 

L. R1ZNIC Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 

2296-98 GEARY STREET 

Near Brodemk 



Telephone We.. 4824 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone Dougla. 287 I 



Home C 4992 



THE 

PACIFICFIREMAN 

JOB DEPARTMENT 
IS NOW PREPARED TO PRINT 
LETTER HEADS 
BILL HEADS 
STATEMENTS 
ENVELOPES 
BUSINESS CARDS 
WEDDING INVITATIONS 
SHIPPING TAGS 
BILLS OF FARE, ETC 
479 TURK STREET 
Phone FRANKLIN 6867 



WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WAR RANT BROKERS 

630 KEA.RINV STREET 

COR COMMERCIAL SAN FRANC ISCO 

Phone Home J 2549 

E.V1IU SCHOENBKIN 



Fireman Cap Maker 

Formerly of 2 1 si and Folsom 
. . . WILLIAMS . : BUILDING.. . 

THIRD STREET 



Cor. Mission, Room 307 



SAN FRANCISCO 




VOL. IX. -NO. 24 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JUNE 15, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Fire Patrol of Seattle. 

Chief Frank L. Stetson, Seattle, 
Wash., is by a recent ordinance made 
the head of the fire patrol system and 
shall have the power to designate for 
his assistants fire marshal, assistant 
fire marshal, chiefs, captains, lieuten- 
ants, first grade pinemen and truck- 
men, all of whom are made members 
of the fire patrol. Each member will 
receive a badge inscribed "Seattle 
Fire Patrol Inspector," to be worn on 
the lapel of the vest and indicating 
his authority to inspect any and all 
buildings. Each member will also be 
furnished with a fire patrol ordinance 
in book form, leather covered. The 
object of this ordinance is to prevent 
fires, and members of the fire patrol 
are required to make themselves fami- 
liar with the provisions of this ordi- 
nance, familiarizing themselves with 
the different classes of buildings, ma- 
terial used, heights and general con- 
struction. The system of inspection 
is ordered by Chief Stetson as follows: 

The first-grade pipemen or truck- 
men of the several companies will in- 
spect one or more buildings each day 
in his district between the hours of 9 
a. m. and 5 p. m. All reports of in- 
spections will be made on forms fur- 
nished for that purpose, which cover 
the classified buildingsas embodied in 
the ordinances. There will be only 
one member of the fire patrol on in- 
spection from any one company at 
any one time. Inspections will be 
made in lespective order by (he pipe- 
men, lieutenants and captains. Any 
buildings found in violation of the fire 
patrol or building ordinances or hazar- 



dous on account of fire, the owner or 
agent must be notified verbally, and 
form No. 36 must be filled out in du- 
plicate covering the nature of the 
verbal order given the owner or agent, 
original to be attached to inspection 
report of building and duplicate re- 
tained in company quarters for refer- 
ence. After a lapse of three days the 
captain, lieutenant or district chief 
will be directed by this office to inspect 
the same building, and if no attempt 
has been made to comply with 
the notice given, said captains, lieu- 
tenants or district chiefs will imme- 
diately notify the chief of the fire de- 
partment or fire marshal of such neg- 
lect on the part of the owner, agent or 
lessee of the building as the case may 
be. The patrolman'- notice form No. 
36 must be used only in cases where 
changes or alterations are required. 
All inspections must be made care- 
fully and thoroughly, studying the 
conditions in relation to the building, 
character of contents stored therein 
and paying particular attention to 
open stairways and elevators, accumu- 
lations of rubbish, inflammable oils, 
explosives, condition of fire appliances, 
fire escapes, outside stairways and 
other exits for occupants. In inspect- 
ing factories of any kind where a 
number of people are employed, in all 
instances consult the owners or mana- 
gers as to the extinguishing of tires, 
the appliances on hand, instructing 
the managers to impress upon all the 
employees the danger of fire and what 
to do in case of fire. Impress upon 
the minds of the employees that in 
case of fire to immediately turn in an 
alarm, and if there is no equipment 



on hand to extinguish the fire close 
the doors so the fire may not spread 
up the elevators and stairways. The 
fire department will do the rest. Par- 
ticular attention must be paid to con- 
ditions surrounding each building, es- 
pecially to the entrance of same in 
case of fire; location of nearest hy- 
drants, fire alarm auxiliaries, obstruc- 
tions in windows and passageways. 
It will be well to make a drawing of 
each floor showing the stairways, etc., 
by so doing the inspector can explain 
to the company to which he is at- 
tached, the character of the building 
and location of stairways, etc. This 
will be of great advantage to each 
and every fireman. It gives him the 
knowledge of how to enter the build- 
ings during fires, and by being pos- 
sessed of this knowledge the danger 
to firemen is very materially lessened. 
As a matter of fact, make the inspec- 
tions educational to all members of 
the companies. Outlying districts 
will be subject to the same inspec- 
tions, more particularly as regards 
the method of heating, lighting, care 
of ashes and combustible refuse, exits 
from attics if used as sleeping apart- 
ments. Impress upon the owners or 
housewives the necessity of some ap- 
pliance at hand that may be used in 
case of fire, such as garden hose, fire 
extinguishers, pails of water, and in- 
struct them bow to use the same when 
a fire occurs. Instruct them about 
giving alarms over the telephone and 
familiarizing themselves with the lo- 
cations of the nearesl lire alarm boxes 
and how to turn in an alarm. Care- 
lessness is the cause of 30 per cent of 
all fires, such as leaving rags and 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



matches near stoves, children playing 
with matches or burning rubbish near 
buildings, etc. Visit the school houses 
in the respective districts and see that 
they are provided with proper fire es- 
capes and exits, and eliminate any- 
thing which might be deemed hazar- 
dous on account of fire. Request the 
principals and teachers to have fire 
drills to leave the building immediate- 
ly in case of danger. It becomes your 
duty to enforce the ordinance for the 
prevention of fires, as well as the ex- 
tinguishing of same. Those who do 
not comply with the requirements of 
the ordinance are subject to the con- 
dition of section 70, which states as 
follows: 

"Any person violating any of the 
provisions of this ordinance shall be 
guilty of a misdemeanor and upon 
conviction thereof shall be punished 
by a fine of not less than $25 nor more 
than $100, or by imprisonment in the 
city jail for a term not exceeding 30 
days, or by both such fine and impris- 
ment and the continuance and main- 
tenance of such violation shall be 
deemed a new offense for each day on 
which the same is continued or main- 
tained and shall be punished accord- 
ingly." 

Inspection reports will be forward- 
ed to the fire marshal as soon as possi- 
ble after each inspection, after having 
been explained to the companies. No 
inspection will be made on Sundays or 
holidays. Company officers will see 
that the company is not run short by 
reason of inspection and inspectors 
while on inspection will respond to 
alarms wherever possible. It is im- 
possible to formulate instructions 
which will cover all points. Necessa- 
rily a great deal must be left to the 
intelligence and judgment of the in- 
spector. Orders will be issued from 
time to time covering different points 
that may arise. — Fireman's Herald. 



Meeting of Board of Directors. 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
Board of Directors of the Los Angeles 
Firemen's Relief Association was call- 
ed to order by President McDowell at 
engine company 3, May 28th, with 
the following members present: Mc- 
Dowell, Gentry, McGarn, Dunn and 
Banning. Absent: Smith and Lennon. 



The Sick and Relief Committee re- 
ported all members on the sick list as 
improving. 

Four applications for membership 
were voted on favorably. 

The bill of Dr. Bassett, association 
physician, amounting to $31.50, was 
ordered paid. 

The regular monthly allowances 
from the Widows and Orphans Fund 
were allowed. 

A special meeting of the Board was 
called for Friday, June 7, at 7:30 p.m. 
for the purpose of counting the ballots 
from the charter amendment election. 

The financial secretary's report was 
read and accepted. 

The Board then adjourned. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Kurt F. Neitske. Rec. Sec. 



Eligible List for Lieutenant Los Angeles 
Fire Department. 

The following is a list of the suc- 
cessful contestants in the recent ex- 
amination for lieutenant, and civil 
service rating: 

E. T. McGann, engine 3 88.4 

C. J. Hawley, engine 23 82.3 

E. Rhoads, engine 3 81.9 

F. M. Watson, engine 15 81.5 

Fred Vaught, engine 24 78.9 

Harvy Carpenter, engine 17 78. 

Ed. Gripp, engine 23 77,5 

L. N. Monroe, engine 26 77.3 

E. O. Carlson, engine 8 76.4 

Torn Stembridge, engine 7 76.1 

George Walker, engine 5 75.4 



Chief Henry Chase of Miami, Fla., 
has invented an automobile starter 
which starts the motor on a 90 H, P. 
auto chemical at the first tap of the 
gong. 

Santa Clara, Cal.— The annual elec- 
tion of the fire department was held 
last week and Henry Menzel was 
elected chief engineer and Chief Dave 
Walsh first assistant. 

With the arrival of the auto chemi- 
cal fire apparatus and the completion 
of the high pressure water system, 
San Mateo's facilities for fighting fire 
are now such as to warrant a substan- 
tial reduction in fire insurance ra'es. 
The committee of the Board of Trade 
will invite the underwriters to inspect 
the system as soon as the new engine 
has been accepted and no doubt the 
reduction asked for will be granted. 

Joseph Latham, formerly second 
assistant chief of the Seattle. Wash., 
fire department, who was dropped 
from the fire department under accu- 
sation of having knowingly received 
stolen goods, has been exonerated by 
the Civil Service Commission. Asa 
compensation to Latham, he may take 
any examination for fire department 
positions without prejudice. An ex- 
amination is soon to be held to select 
an assistant fire marshal. 



Auburn, Cal. — The fire department 
has ordered 600 feet of hose. 

Watsonville, Cal. — The city officials 
and Chief Sandberg are considering 
the purchase of 500 feet of fire hose. 

Visalia, Cal. — A number of the vol- 
unteer firemen are resigning because 
of the refusal of the city to pay the $2 
annual poll tax. 

Visalia, Cal.— The fire department 
members met June 5 and elected the 
following officers: Chief, Silas Denz; 
First Assistant, Bert Williams. 



Monrovia, Cal. — The auto-propelled 
fire engine is undergoing extensive 
repairs. The city council cannot un- 
derstand the reason for having pur- 
chased the machine when it failed to 
meet the requirements. 



The trustees of Hillsborough have 
passed a resolution adopting specifica- 
tions and inviting bids for an auto 
chemical fire engine, hose and other 
equipment necessary to install a per- 
fect system of fire protection equal to 
the best. The engine selected is to 
be given the severest tests as to hill- 
climbing, endurance, etc. The bids 
are to be opened on July 16th. There 
will be separate bids for the hose and 
the engine. 

Santa Clara, Cal.— Sealed bids will 
be received by the clerk of the Board 
of Trustees ui> to 8 p. m. July 1. 1912, 
for the sale of municipal bonds, among 
them being $5500 for the aquisition of 
fire apparatus, a combination motor- 
driven chemical and fire hose wagon. 
They will be 40 in number of the de- 
nomination of $137.50 each, bearing 5 
per cent interest per annum. One of 
them will mature July 1, 1913. and 
|one will be payable each year there- 
after. 



P A C 1 V 1 C V 1 i: E 11 



Alcazar Theatre. 

"The Deep Purple" enters its sec- 
ond and final week at the Alcazar 
Theatre next Monday evening. The 
attraction has everything to commend 
it— an absorbing subject, interesting 
characters, clever dialogue, thrilling 
situations, a splendid pictorial produc- 
tion and a cast that could not be ex- 
celled in the task of bringing out the 
virility and realism of the play. Rich- 
ard Bennett, Ada Dwyer, Mabel Mor- 
rison and all the other people have 
never appeared to better advantage. 
They could not be better suited if their 
roles had been built with especial view 
to fit their respective talents, and 
their "team work" is marked by un- 
usual smoothness. Of course, Mr. 
Bennett and the Misses Dwer and 
Morrison were expected to be more 
than ordinarily effective in this play, 
because of their experience in the 
original cast, but that their excellence 
would infect all the other people on 
the Alcazar stage was not taken into 
consideration by the public. Yet that 
very thing occurred, and is explana- 
tory of the remarkable ensemble 
acting. 

Empress Theatre. 

"Paris By Night," with a cast of 
fifteen pantomimists, will headline 
the offering at the Empress commenc- 
ing Sunday afternoon. Mario Molasso, 
a dancer of international fame, as- 
sisted by Anna Kremser are the fea- 
tured players. Featuring the bill will 
be Edwina Barry, in "The Home 
Breaker." Tom Mahoney, a monolo- 
gist with a grist of stories and several 
good songs, will be there with the 
laugh stuff. The genuine Chinese 
Band of 40 soloists, all native born 
Chinese, will present a repertoire of 
classical and popular melodies. Al- 
fonso Silvano, the French equilibrist, 
will be seen in some astounding bal- 
ancing feats at the top of a fifteen- 
foot pedestal. Ted E. Box, one of Eng- 
land's eccentric comedians, is return- 
ing to America for a tour of the S. & 
C. circuit after an absence of five 
years. The great Fitzgerald, a pro- 
tean artist with a world-wide reputa- 
tion, returns to America after a tour 
of the world. Another of England's 
favorites will be Larena, one of the 
most popular music hall dancers in 
London. She is a clever unman and 
will attract no little attention by her 
ability: 



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PACIFIC FIREMAN 



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IREMAN 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and mones orden should 

be made payable. 
H. G. PRESTuN Business Manage r 

Editorial Rooms and Business Office, 479 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Tele phone Franklin 6867. 

Entered as second-class matter March 21. 190?, at thr> 
Postoftice at San Francisco, Cat., under the Act of Con- 
gress of Marc h 8. 1879. 

SATURDAY ... JUME IS, 1912 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance $2 IK) 

Six months 

AD\ ERTISEMENTS 

Inserted on the most favorable term-;, especially Inure and 

continuous ones. 



San Francisco Fire Commissioners 

The Board of Fire Commissioners met in 

special session Thursday afternoon (Commis- 
sioner Donohoe absent) and transacted the 

following business: 

Dr. Hugh Lagan was appointed department 
physician and surgeon. 

Harry Wilson, truck 1, was suspended for 
60 days for being intoxicated on duty. 

The regular session was held Thursday 
afternoon (Commissioner Donohoe absent) 
and the following business transacted: 

Report of the Administrative Committee on 
communications with recommendations: 

Communication from the Local Inspectors, 
Steamboat Inspection Service, U. S. A., enu- 
merating certain recommendations that will 
be rigidly enforced on all steam and motor 
vessels, such as that no less than two fire < x- 
tinguishers and a barrel of sand be placed in 



making application for leave of absence, with- 
out pay. for two months from July 1, with 
the privilege of leaving the city, on account 
of sickness in family. Recommended for ap- 
proval. 

From Wm. F. Egan, department veterina- 
rian, reporting on sick and injured horses be- 
longing to the department for the month of 
May. Filed. 

From the chief engineer, recommending 
that a communication be addressed to the 
Spring Valley Water Company calling atten- 
tion to the fact that there is no water in the 
mains in Parkside a greater part of the time. 
Recommended for approval; also call atten- 
tion Board of Supervisors. 

From A. Beaver, Business Agent Local 
No. 6, Stationary Firemen, complaining of 
conditions at the pumping station at Second 
and Townsend streets in regard to men and 
hours, and asking to be allowed to be beard 
in protest. Recommend that a hearing be 
given Mr. Beaver Friday, at 5:15 p. m. 

From Jos. H. Burnett, operator seventh 
battalion district, making application for 
salary during disability, caused by sprained 
ankle responding to an alarm of fire May 18. 
Recommended lor approval. 

From Martin C. Stewart, hoseman engine 
4, making application for transfer to the po- 
sition of hoseman engine 42. to take effect 
June 16. Recommended for approval. 

From G. C. Racehorn, driver engine IT, 
making application for transfer to the posi- 
tion of truckman truck 3, to take effect June 
16. Recommended for approval. 

All recommendations were adopted. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Matter of awarding contracts for supplies 
for the fiscal year 1912-13. Laid over. 

Matter of imposing penalty on George E. 



the engine rooms so as to be of service when Gibltn, hoseman engine 31. for absenting him- 



required. 

Acknowledged with letter of approval. 
The chief engineer has had the necessary ex- 
tinguishers and sand placed on each of the 
fire boats and copies of the order have been 
placed in the hands of Captain Danahy and 
Captain Engelke and Battalion Chief Waher 
A. Cook. 

From H. G. Cull, stoker engine 15, making 
application for leave of absence, with pay. 
for thirty days from June 7, on account of 
sickness. Recommended for approval. 

From the chief engineer, recommending a 
letter of commendation for Walter Lintott, 
stoker engine 26, For responding to an alarm 
of tire with his company when on his day off. 
Recommended for approval. 

From the Civil Service Commission, author- 
izing the appointment of three temporary 
gatemen for the auxiliary water supply sys- 
tem for thirty days from June 2. Filed. 

From the Heidelberg Inn Company, ex- 
pressing appreciation and tendering thanks 
for assistance rendered at a fire occurring on 
the premises of the above company on April 
28, and enclosing check for $50 for the Fire- 
men's Mutual Aid Fund. Acknowledged with 
thanks and filed. 

From Henry Casey, truckman truck 6, 



/ 



self from duty without permission on March 
29 and dO. Laid over. 

Matter of awarding contracts for motor- 
driven apparatus. Laid over. 

NEW BUSINESS. 

Matter of receiving sealed proposals for 
removing manure, ashes and garbage for the 
houses of the San Francisco Fire Depart- 
ment. Time 5 to 5:30 p. m. Bids received 
varied from $575 to $250 per month. Laid 
over. 

Mr. Gorham and Mr. Taber of the Gorham 
Engineering Company, representing the Sea- 
grave Company, appeared before the Board 
and stated in regard to the test of the auto- 
mobile chemical built for San Francisco, that 
it \v,»uld be impossible to make 20 miles per 
hour on the eighteen and eighteen-hundredth 
per cent grade of California-street hill on ac- 
( m of the heavy construction of the ma- 
chine, consequently they were perfectly sat- 
isfied for the Board to reject the machine. 
Upon recommendation of the chief this was 
done. 

A special meeting was held Friday after- 
noon (Commissioner Donohoe absent} and the 
following business transacted: 

A. Beaver, business agent of the Stationary 
Firemen's Union, entered a protest against 



the three firemen at the pumping station 
being kept in quarters 24 hours for four days 
and claimed that one man could keep the fires 
going. When an alarm came in the two fire- 
men off watch could respond and report for 
duty. The matter was laid over until next 
week for further discussion. 

Wm. Malhison, engine 6, was suspended 
for one year for being under the influence of 
liquor while on duty and failing to respond to 
an alarm with his company. 

Joe Barsky is Married. 

Over a hundred guests assembled at 1202 
Howard street last Sunday afternoon to wit- 
ness the ceremony, which, according to the 
Hebrew religion, made Miss Hilda Meyer the 
wife of Joseph Barsky, a member of engine 
2 in the San Francisco Fire Department. 
The rooms were decorated in various ways, 
the front and back parlor with flowers, the 
bedrooms with ladies' hats and wraps, the 
dining room with a heavily-laden table sup- 
porting a variety of cakes and wines, with a 
large punch bowl of lemonade in the center. 
The kitchen decorations consisted of plates, 
spoons, glasses and a large ice cream freezer, 
which later was opened up to relieve the per- 
spii ing crowd. 

The ceremony was performed under a silken 
canopy, held up by four family friends, and 
to the strains of the "Beethoven" Wedding 
March, on violin and piano, first the groom 
and then the bride were conducted before the 
Rabbi. The ceremony was very simple and 
differed from the Christian service only in 
the partaking of wine by the three parties to 
the ceremony and in the breaking of the wine 
glass by the groom at the close, with the 
prayer that unhappiness should not enter into 
their lives until the pieces of glass should be 
again united The short address by theRabbi 
was a beautiful sermon and if his advice was 
followed by everj body on earth there would 
be no desire for a hereafter. The afternoon 
was spent in dancing, singing and making the 
refreshments disappear. 

The members of engine 2 had been fur- 
nished with a wedding cake and at the con- 
clusion of the ceremony the telephone was 
utilized to inform Chief Britt that it was time 
to cut the cake. 

Joe Tracy, engine 14. has returned .from 
Gilroy, where he spent hir vacation. He says 
he is feeling fine and gained ten pounds. 

John Mallory has gone on vacation with 
enough fishing tackle to clean out the Russian 
River, and if he keeps his promises. to supply 
fish to his friends, it will certainly leave 
some lonesome fish in the stream. 




J. McCluskey, for 22 years a member of 
the San Francisco Fire Department, one of 
its hardest workers and a man whom two 
chiefs have pronounced to be absolutely the 
best man in the department, has reached the 
age of 55 and at his own request, in accor- 
dance with the. provisions of the charter, will 
be retired on pension July 1. He was ap- 
pointed second assisted chief in 1910. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Around the Bay. 

[Special Correspondence.] 

Santa Rosa has been keeping up with the 
times in fire fighting apparatus. The depart- 
ment is quartered in a fine two-story brick 
building on Fourth street, in the center of 
the city. The city limits extend at the pres- 
ent time one and a half miles on either side 
of the engine house, and the city expects soon 
to annex one-fourth of a mile on each side. 
This will make the run too long, and should 
the annexation go through the city will be 
forced to place another engine company in 
service. There are twelve men in the de- 
partment at the present time, six regular 
and six call men. The apparatus consists of 
two pumping engines, two hose wagons, hook 
and ladder truck and a new combination chemi- 
cal engine and hose truck which was put into 
service last December. 

Petaluma has advertised for bids on a new 
combination chemical engine and hose truck. 
At the present time the department is not 
very well prepared for a large fire. The ap- 
paratus consists mostly of hose wagons, and 
while Chief Adams keeps the boys well 
drilled, yet if a fire should secure a good 
start it would take some time to reach the 
scene and it would prove disastrous with only 
the present apparatus to work with. 

Engine company 1 of the Petaluma depart- 
ment held their regular monthly meeting 
June 6 and elected the following officers for 
the year: President, Harry E. Harding; 
Foreman, Frank Hoirup; First Asst. Fore- 
man, Dan Jamison;- Second Asst. Foreman, 
Chas. Potter; Secretary, J. W. Studderd; 
Treasurer, R. S. Adams; Finance Committee, 
F. Hoirup, W. Soldate, Will Roach; Trustees, 
M. J. Hickey, Geo. Gow and Frank Stewart. 
A drill was held before the meeting and par- 
ticipated in by a large number of the mem- 
bers. During the business session the picnic 
committee made a reportand were discharged 
with a vote of thanks. Light refreshments 
were served at the conclusion of the session. 



Firemen Play Ball. 

On the morning of Friday, June 7th, the 
North Beach play grounds was the scene of 
an exciting and hot ly-contested game of base- 
ball between the "Jolly Two Trucks" .-.nil 
tlie "Four Truck Aristocrats, " the latter 
team winning by a score of 6 to 2. 

The contest wan replete with fast plays, 
the pitchers, both of whom pitched splendid 

ball, being well supported. The I''. .or Trucks 

won by timely hitting and good base running. 
The (score: 

R II B 

"Four Truck Aristocrats", 6 7 H 

"J. .My Two Truckt " 2 :i :i 

Batteries Comber and Brennan, Morgan 
and v.tlente. 

Tin- complete line up of both teams was as 
follows: Two Truck Derham, r. f. ; Hack- 
ett, 3rd; Buckley, I. f.; Morgan, n , Mohaupt, 
1st; Valente, c. ; Riddel I, c. !'. ; l.avaroni, 2d; 

Hoover, s. s. The Four Trucks Walsh, 2d,; 
Bowler, 3d; Lindeberk, 1st; Comber, p.; 



Church, c. f. ; O'Neil, s. s. ; Parry, 1. f. ; 
Brennan, c; Brown, r. f. 

The melodious voice of Lieut. Frank Smith, 
manager of the Jolly Two Trucks, is sadly 
out of condition. His best vocal efforts since 
the game being confined to hoarse whispers 
as a result of the strenuous volleys of advice 
and encouragement hurled at his "braves" 
when Dame Fortune turned her back on his 
team's best endeavors. 

Seattle, Wash. 

Synopsis of the Fire Marshal's report to 
the City Council for the month of May, 1912: 

Value of buildings involved $205,435.00 

Value of contentsof same 151,753.00 

Total value involved 357,188.00 

Insurance on buildings 134,350.00 

Insurance on contents of same 74,075.00 

Total insurance involved 211,275.00 

Loss on buildings 20,745.35 

On their contents 17,954.25 

Total loss on buildings & contents 38,699.60 

Alarms from street boxes, 30; by tele- 
phone. 60; given atstations, 11; second alarms, 
3; special calls, 4; total alarmsof all kinds 108. 

Calls for special work, 2; false alarms, 20; 
needless alarms, 3; fires, 75 

Number of fires caused by chimneys and 
flues, 16; matches and smoking, 13; rubbish, 
11; by unknown causes, 8; by gasoline, 6; 
heating and cooking devices, 3; by gas, 2; 
boiling over of grease and pitch, 3; electric 
lighting, 2; by incendiary, 1; spontaneous 
ignition, 1; vacant buildings, 4. 

Number of brick, stone or concrete build- 
ings involved in fires, 7; frame buildings in- 
volved in fires, 45. 

Number of automobiles, 3; gasoline launch, 
1; houseboats, 3, awnings, 6; bridge fires, 5; 
grass and brush fires, 3. 

Number of fires extending to adjoining 
buildings, 6; beyond adjoining buildings, 1. 

Number of fires confined to the floor on 
which they started, 21. 

Number of inspections of manufacturing 
plants, 87; business and hotel buildings, 121; 
schools anil assembly halls, 38; apartment 
houses and dwellings, 124. 

H. W. Bringhurst, 

Fire Marshal. 

An Acknowledgment. 

The following letter speaks for itself: 

Headquarters Pan Francisco Fire Department 
,\l utual Vid An inciatt n, Iw 
taurine Company SB. 2186 Geary Street. 

IT. I.. Mirscti. Eaq.. Mpr. Heidelberg- Inn, & Kllis Street 

Dear Sir: I desire iii acknowledge tin- re 

ceipt of your most kind donation nf fifty 

dollars to I he funds' of the Mutual Aid Asso 

ciation of the San Francisco file Department, 

and I de in- Hi tin' &a i to expri to 

you my mosl sincere thanks as well as those 

of the members of this association for your 

most gjenerous gift and to assure you thai the 

same is b r.-itei ullv n ppreciated. 

Very truly yours, 

Geo. F. Brow n. 
Secretary Treaaui < r S. F. F. 1 ». 

Mutual Aid Association, 



Pacific Coast Association of Fire Chiefs. 

Seattle, June 10, 1912. 

Editor Pacific Fireman. 

The Executive Committee of the Pacific 
Coast Association of Fire Chiefs is now con- 
sidering the arrangements for the Twentieth 
Annual Convention of that organization, 
which is to be held in Los Angeles next Sep- 
tember. The time is likely to be fixed for 
the week commencing September 9, in order 
to accommodate those who wish to attend the 
convention at Denver. 

Chief A. J. Eley has selected the Hollen- 
beck Hotel, in Los Angeles, as the official 
headquarters of the Pacific Coast-Association 
during the convention, because of its proxi- 
mity to the central fire station and having 
other advantages in location. Special rates 
have been made by this hotel for the dele- 
gates, and the management has assured Chief 
Eley that nothing will be left undone to ren- 
der the stay of the visitors enjoyable. It is 
absolutely necessary, however, that those at- 
tending notify Chief Eley as soon as possible 
of the accommodations that they will need 
next September. 

Those who wish to go from Los Angeles to 
Denver to attend the International Conven- 
tion, will be interested in knowing that the 
shortest line is the S. P. L. A. & Salt Lake 
line and on this the morning train reaches 
Denver in 48 hours. The evening train re- 
quires 10 hours longer. To be in time fur 
Denver one must leave Los Angeles not later 
that Sunday morning, September 15. 

Every one interested in fire department or 
fire protection work should make his arrange- 
ments NOW to attend the convention, and 
promptly give notice to Chief Eley as to his 
hotel accommodations. 

Harry W. Bringhurst, 

Secretary. 



The Horse Must Go. 

At the beginning of the year 1912, Passaic, 
N. J., had 27 horses which, outside of veteri- 
nary bills, cost the department $6,800 to feed 
and shoe. To day there is not a .-ingle horse 
in tlie department and the cost of maintaining 
ali the motor vehicles dees net i xceed $1,200 
per year, the saving ti» tie- city betweten the 

cost of maintaining horses and motor appa- 
ratus being sufficient to pay for one piece of 
ppuratus each yea r 

Passaie now has live ,-enihinal ion chert, icals, 

i w.i tractors, one pumper ami In -■• wagon, 
one 40-horsepower car for the chief, ei 
horsepower car for tin- assistant chief and 
.me 51 ii"i epov it upply wagon. 



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PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries Chief McCann ResiBns 



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Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

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FLORISTS 



In order to become manager of a 
fire apparatus concern, of which he is 
a director and stockholder. Chief 
Michael McCann has resigned as head 
of the Stockton, Cal., fire department. 

Chief McCann became a Stockton 
fireman in 1869, when he was 21 years 
old. He occupied practically every 
office in the volunteer force and was 
appointed chief when the paid depart- 
ment was organized. He has been 
chief ever since, with one or two in- 
i tervals of private business. McCann 
i was president of Pacific Coast Asso- 
ciation of Fire Chiefs in 1910-11, and 
is known from British Columbia to 
the Mexican line. Deputy Chief M. 
D. Murphy has been elected to suc- 
ceed McCann. — Fireman's Herald. 



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the: 

PACIFICFIREMAN 

JOB DEPARTMENT 
IS NOW PREPARED TO PRINT 
LETTER HEADS 
BILL HEADS 
STATEMENTS 
ENVELOPES 
BUSINESS CARDS 
WEDDING INVITATIONS 
SHIPPING TAGS 
BILLS OF FARE. ETC 

479 TURK STREET 
Phone FRANKLIN 6867 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



The telephone operators in New York City 
handle 180,000 calls every rush hour. They will 
connect you with any oue of 500,000 subscribers 
In half a minute. 

Ask the exchange manager how he can handle 
all these calls, and lie will tell you tersely, "By 
.^.Lvint: the seconds." 

"Schedule time" is the keynote of American 
industry. That means Howard time. There's 
always somebody higher up holding a Howard 
Watch on the job— demanding the Howard type 
at accuracy and punctuality. 

The Howard is the one watch in the world 
wholly adapted to modern progress. It has 
the precise construction and the scientific ad- 
justment. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pay lor it. 

The price of each watch— from the 17-jewel 
(double roller) in a Crescent Extra or Jas. Boss 
Extra gold-filled case at $40. to the 23-jewel at 
Jl'.O, and the Edward Howard model at $330— 
is fixed at the factory and a printed ticket at- 
tached. 

Find the Howard jeweler in your town and 
talk to him. Not every jeweler can sell you a 
Howard. The jeweler who can is a good man 
to know. 

Admiral Sigsbee has written a little hook. 
"The Log of the Howard Watch." giving the 
record of his own Howard in the U. S. Navy. 
You'll enjoy it. Drop us a post-card, Dept. N, 
and we'll send you a copy. 
HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston, Ma>. 

T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 

71 WALLER ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Kearny 3523 



Ho 



JOE. H. ROSENBERG 

(Ctuil anb ffltltlary tTatlnr 

73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 
Louii Frankenberg. formerly with Ro«enblum & Abraham. Manager 



Home phone S 2517 

The Little Emporium 

L. RIZNIC Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 
2296-98 GEARY STREET 

Near Broderuk „ 

Telephone We.1 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone Douglas 287 1 



Home C 4992 



WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRANT BROKERS 

630 KEARNY' STREET 

COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Home J 2549 

EM1L SCHOENBEIN 

Fireman Cap Maker 

Formerly of 2 1 st and Folsom 
...WILLIAMS.-. BUILDING... 

THIRD STREET 

Cor. Mission. Room 307 SAN FRANCISCO 




VOL. IX. -NO. 25 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, JUNE 22, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Practical Fire Prevention. 



[By Edward F. Croker in The Engineering Magazine.] 



It is not generally realized by laymen that order, clean- 
liness, discipline, alert administration and inspection are 
even more effective in fire prevention than mere occu- 
pancy of fireproof structures. This aspect of wholly 
practicable protection is developed by ex-Chief Croker in 
the following pages.— The Editors. 

A series of fires brought to the 
minds of the public the startling fact 
that insurance to cover loss by fire was 
not a complete panacea for the many 
dangers and loss of life occasioned by 
the most dreaded enemy of civiliza- 
tion — fire. It was then that the legis- 
lature of the Empire State became 
alive to the situation, and in quick suc- 
cession followed laws creating a state 
fire marshal, anew bureau for the pre- 
vention of fires for the City of New 
York, and the appointment of a splen- 
did non-partisan body of public-spirit- 
ed citizens known as the State Factory 
Investigating Commission. Thus, a 
quiet but, persistent agitation, beginn- 
ing as far back as 1835 and continually 
kept alive by various people (promi- 
nent among whom was the late Ed- 
ward Atkinson) for practical fire pre- 
vention has borne fruit. 

When in 1899 I was appointed chief 
of the department, the consolidation 
of the various boroughs had recently 
taken place and the welding together 
of the various elements into a single 
department was in itself a sufficiently 
difficult problem to keep everyone 
connected with the department ex- 
ceedingly busy. This having been 
accomplished, however, in 1904 the 
department began in a modest way to 
make a study of the subject of fire pre- 
vention, and the formation of a subor- 



dinate branch, under the direction of 
the chief of department, known as the 
Bureau of Violations, began to impress 
upon the people of New York that the 
department required their co-opera- 
tion and assistance by the installation 
of various auxiliary fire appliances, 
such as standpipes, hose, fire extin- 
guishers, sprinkler and automatic fire- 
alarm systems, etc., to keep in check 
and promptly subdue fires in their in- 
cipient stage, pending the arrival of 
the department. This was not such 
an easy task as might be imagined; 
property owners began to piotest 
against the additional expense imposed 
upon them, and the department was 
compelled (through the assistance of 
the corporation council, in charge of 
the Bureau for Recovery of Penalties) 
to fight step by step for the enforce- 
ment of its demands, which were en- 
tirely reasonable and valid, but too 
often looked upon by the business 
public (not alive to the necessity of 
practical fire prevention) as an unne- 
cessary hardship. 

EVOLUTION OF FIRE PREVENTION. 

Fire prevention is simply the science 
of making life and property safe 
against destruction by fire. It should 
always be remembered that all fires 
are small at the beginning, and most 
are due to preventable causes, such as 
gas, rats' nests made of matches and 
oil-soaked cotton, poor electric wiring, 
spontaneous combustion, accumulation 
of rubbish, etc., all of which can be 
eliminated by a system of careful and 
practical inspections. While our fire 
departments are as a rule splendidly 
organized and thoroughly equipped 
with the most approved apparatus and 



the members ever ready to lay down 
their lives in the performance of their 
duty, it must be remembered that fire 
spreads with the rapidity of lightning, 
and very often when the department 
is summoned, especially upon a delay- 
ed alarm, they can do nothing more 
than confine the fire to the building in 
which it originates. Here is where 
the great value of the installation of 
the "quick -acting" automatic fire 
alarm, the automatic sprinkler, the 
fire-proof door, standpipes, hose, fire 
extinguishers, fire hooks, axes, etc., 
and the drilling and instructing of the 
employees should be recognized, for 
with such organization and appliances, 
nine out of ten fires can be held in 
check until the arrival of the depart- 
ment and thousands of dollars saved 
to building and contents. 

"An ounce of prevention is worth a 
pound of cure," with fires, as well as 
any other evil; but the average busi- 
ness man heretofore has not acted 
upon this principle, relying rather on 
the assurance of his insurance broker 
that he is protected against financial 
loss. Because he is a taxpayer and 
voter, he calmly depends upon the fire 
department to come and put out his fire, 
not realizing the natural limitations 
to the most efficient of all fire depart- 
ments. Most fires can be prevented, 
and those that cannot, can be discov- 
ered and extinguished with verj little 
loss or danger. In this connection the 
fire expert becomes a necessity to the 
average man and woman. He should, 
however, be an expert, well informed 
about the causes of (ires and how to 
remove them— one who understands 
the planning and construction of build- 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



ings and hence is able to consult with 
architects and builders, one who pos- 
sesses also a thorough knowledge of 
the many approved detecting and ex- 
tinguishing appliances, and who ap- 
preciates what firemen need as an 
assistance in putting out fires. This 
is where a new field of professional 
activity has appeared. This is why 
organized, expert advice and instruc- 
tion, and systematic inspection and 
service have become a factor in the 
science of the preventiolHjf fire. 

FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF FIRE- 
PREVENTrVE SERVICE. 

An inspector should make a study 
of the building, apply the principles 
of fire prevention to existing condir 
tions, and in his report furnish proper 
recommendations for rendering the 
premises s,afe. Its external conditions 
must be considered, to see what danr 
gers it faces from its neighbors and 
the, buildings in the vicinity. To meet 
this outside exposure, wire-glass win- 
dows and iron shutters are recom- 

. mended. The roof must also be ex- 
amined anff the skylight protected 
against firebrands dropping through 
the glass and causing fire within. In 
the interior of the building the haz- 
ards must be examined and dangerous 
conditions corrected. These are often 
found to exist in the heating and light- 
ing fixtures, unnecessary rubbish and 
storing of unused,, and unnecessary 
articles. These matters always re- 
quire special attention, and with the 
building.generally in a,, ele^n condi- 

. tion, causes for fires can generally be 
removed. It is advisable thai, all sta'r- 
ways, elevators and other openings 
through the floors be enclosed, thus 
preventing fire from spreading 
through them from one floor to 
another. 

The next step should be to deter- 
mine and procure proper and suitable 
fire extinguishers and detecting ap- 
pliances (including the service of com- 
petent retired firemen to act as watch- 
men) such as automatic fire alarms, 
sprinklers where necessary, bell sys- 
tems for drills, etc.. a manual box to 
notify fire headquarters, safety bucket 
tanks containing fire pails, fire extin- 
guishers, standpipes and hose on each 
floor in certain classes of buildings, 
fire stops, such as fire doors (self-clos- 



ing) fire windows or windows with 
wire glass, aud in buildings of large 
areas, fire walls. 

Then comes the provision and con- 
duct of fire drills, which are absolute- 
ly necessary in almost all classes of 
buildings, and with these should be 
given frequent short lectures as to the 
proper method of acting in case of fire 
or other alarm, and how to use fire ap- 
pliances properly; emphasis should be 
laid upon the necessity of keeping 
premises in a clean condition, throw- 
ing oily waste, rags, paper, rubbish, 
etc., only into self-closing waste ckiis; 
having sufficient aisle space, etc.; the 
formation of employees into ranks 
and their quietly marching under lea- 
dership to exits, the assignment of 
certain employees to use fire applian- 
ces, notification of the fire depart- 
ment, and co-operation with the fire 
men when they arrive, 
should be installed by 
fire expert, because it is only the ex r 
pert who can anticipate the starting 
of a fire, indicate its probable exteiir 
sion, and provide for the unusual con- 
ditionsjhat are bound to arise. So- 
called [fire drills given by amateurs, 
irith liule knowledge or skill, are as. 
Inn}, if not worse than no fire drills 
at nil. 

Then must follow a system of week- 
ly, semi-monthly and monthly inspec 



possible to make them, and the num- 
ber of fires and the fire loss would be 
so greatly , reduced as to cause the 
business men to ponder why they had 
not obtained such a service long ago, 
particularly as the cost is reasonable 
and the results highly satisfactory. 

(Continued in next issue.) 

Fresno, Cal.— The new motor chem- 
ical apparatus has been placed in com- 
mission and will be given anineiy- 
days trial as to cost of upkeep. An 
account of the expenditures for the 
chemical drawn by horses will also be 
kept and compared at the end of three 
months. Should the auto chemical 
prove the cheaper, it is likely that it 
will be purchased by the city for the 
fire department. 

Oroville, Cal.— The Board of Trus- 
tees have received specifications for 
fire drill tlle ec l u 'P ment which is to he purchas- 
no one but a ed for the O roville fire department. 
After an exhaustive investigation into 
the matter in which advice was ob- 
tained from a number of those who 
from actual experience are best posted 
in fire fighting apparatus:, it was de- 
cided to purchase a combination auto 
chemical engine carrying fire hose. 

Port Orford, Ore.— A progressive 
merchant has erected a 5,000 gallon 
tank over his well in a central posi- 
tion to the surrounding buildings. A 



tions of -buildings, which must be windmill will keep the tank full of 
fhoroughand searching in their opera- water. A long hose that will connect 
tion, and any change in conditions j with the tank will enable water to be 
previously noted should be immediate- conveyed to all the important build- 
ly communicated to the owner or, ings. in town, thus greatly reduc- 
tenant with proper recommendations ing the danger of fires. The people 
to meet each individual case. in reach of the fire protection will con- 

In buildings where resident expert i t . rib ( u . te to f th f ex P ense - This is the 
,f . ,, x . : ,. F . first important move ever made in Port 
inspectors (desirably retired firemen), Qrford t6protect tne town, and it is 

are stationed permanently, visits ; certainly timely and sensible, 
should he made at frequent and irr« 



gular intervals by supervising inspec- 
tors, who ascertain if the men are 
properly performing their duties to 
which they have been assigned. 

Long experience in the fire depart- 
ment has shown me that if such meth- 
ods of inspections, drills, reports and 
recommendation were put into gener- 
al practice by the various factories, 
lofts and business buildings, hotels, in- 
stitutions, etc., their premises would 
be as safeguarded from the. possibili- 



ty of fire occurring as it would be issue 



San Diego, Cal. — New equipment 
for the fire department, consisting of 
four auto steamers and five auto chem- 
icals, are desired by Superintendent 
A. E. Dodson. who is preparing an 
ordinance authorizing their purcl ase. 
At present the city has no steamers 
with automobile power, but has thiee 
or four automobile chemicals. Ac- 
cording to Superintendent Dodson, by 
placing orders for the machines now, 
delivery soon after the first of next 
year will 4 be assured. Three auto 
chemicals are to be placed in the new 
stations authorized by the recent bond 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

"Pierre of the Plains" will be start- 
ed on a week's run next Monday even- 
ing at the Alcazar, with Richard 
Bennett, Mabel Morrison and the full 
strength of the stock company in the 
cast. In the title part Mr. Bennett 
scored his most emphatic hit last 
season in the Sutter-street home of 
the drama, and the play's coming- 
revival is largely owing to popular 
request. The play abounds in human 
interest and in thrilling- situations. 
In the cast with Mr. Bennett are Miss 
Mabel Morrison, who plays Jan, and 
the full strength of the Alcazar com- 
pany. Each of the four acts calls for 
an elaborate setting and the scenic- 
side of the play will be extreme!} 
picturesque. 

Empress Theatre. 

Heading the new program will be 
Jean Clark's roaring farce, "Like 
Father, Like Son," in which will ap- 
pear John C. Barrows and John Lan- 
caster, with capable support. A re- 
cent recruit to vaudeville is Nat Carr, 
the former principal comedian of 
"Wine, Woman and Song," offering 
stories, patter and a series of parodies 
on popular songs. Ed. Morrell is the 
special added feature. He will give a 
vivid description of Jake Oppenhei- 
mer, also his own experiences, tor- 
tures and long years in solitary con- 
finement. "Jimmy Pinkerton's First 
Case," presented by Eddie Heron and 
Madge Douglas, is a bright little 
sketch with a mixture of humor and 
tears. One of the most daring and 
difficult feats performed by Harry 
Thiller takes place on a pyramid of 
chairs and tables. Matron and Heins, 
black-face comedians, will unload a 
bunch of humor and parodies: Luce 
and Luce have a number of popular 
ballads and ragtime hits. The Damon 
Family, the world's greatest aerial- 
isls. will negotiate new, daring and 
difficult feats in mid air. 

Sawtelle, Cal. An auto chemical 
engine, with equipment and improve- 
ments in the fire station, are desired 
by the fire department, if the voters 
approve the $10,000 bond issue. Tlw 
firemen have appointed a committee 
to confer with the t i-u si ccs and In re 
operate in gathering facts on the ma- 
chines licsl adapted to the local field. 



FOR BETTER FIRE PROTECTION 
in the: village: 

a seagrave 2-wheel hand-drawn chemical 




Gorham Engineering Company, Inc. 



SEATTLE 

216 Jackson Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Street 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 S. Olive Street 



American Ru bber Mfg. Co. 

9-11 Beale Street, San Francis~.o, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories— Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, CbI. 



WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 



Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose. Brass 
Goods, Valves and. All Fire Department Supplies 



When You're Buyin' Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

L. H. &. B. I. BILL 

Sole Distributors for the Pcclflc Coast 543 (lotden (late Ave., San FranclKO 





PACIFIC FIREMAN 




PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 
BY 

JAS. K. MACK EditorandProprn--l.tr 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 

Editorial Rooms and Business Othce. 479 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 

Entered as second-class matter March 21, 1908, at I hf! 
Postolfice at San Francisco, Cat. under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 

SATURDAY JUVE 22. 1912 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance $2.00 

Six months 1.00 



Prize Fire Prevention Essay. 

Wishing to encourage the study of fire pre- 
vention by the school children, a leading in- 
surance firm of Huntington Beach offered 
three prizes for the best essays on the subject 
by high school students. 

The first prize was won by Paul Leebrick 
of the class of 1914. We take pleasure in re- 
printing the essay which won first prize. 

THE FIRE HAZARD. 



the difference in construction and equipment 
of buildings, lack of attention to common 
hazards, absence of precaution in storage and 
use of inflammables and inadequate laws and 
ordinances. 

Wood is the chief building material because 
it is the cheapest and most widely distributed 
of all materials. As a result the greatest 
number of buildings in this country have been 
built of lumber, and its use is responsible for ' 
much of the fire loss. Wood, even when used 
in the most careful manner, should be re- 
stricted to buildings and sheds of moderate 
size, with plenty of space around them. 

The straggling little village, with its many 
frame buildings, grew to be a town and then|a 
city before the citizens realized the need of 
building restrictions. Broadly speaking, 
buildings make a city. Thus the safety of 
the people depends on the construction of the 
buildings. When a building is to be erected, 
the whole community has a. direct interest in 
demanding lhat it be so built as to insure the 
safety of the citizens at all times. 

Of all the powers of a city council, one of 
the most important is the power to enact and 
enforce building ordinances. A building ordi- 
nance is an ordinance relating to the con- 
struction of and official supervision over 
buildings for the public safety, health and 



act in the same way. 

In protecting a city from fire a great deal 
depends on the individual citizens. Each citi- 
zen must take a personal interest in the wel- 
fare of the city, and do his part to enforce 
the ordinances. He must use explosives and 
matches carefully, and be precautious at all 
times. The safety of the citizens depends on 
no other than the citizens themselves. The 
sooner we realize this the better. —Insurance 
and Investment News. 



How Fire Lurks in Waste. 



' It is to be regretted that the majority of comfort. A building ordinance has to do with 

our American citizens do not realize the re- buildings both large and small, and is one of 

sponsibility that rests on them as individuals the very best fire preventatives. 

in protecting their community from fire. As by far the majority of fires are due to 

When $215,084,709 is lost in one year from carelessness, let us now turn our attention to 



preventable fires, as was the case in 1907, we 
can easily see the importance of taking steps 
to prevent such an unnnecessary loss. 

Out of 1349 fires in Los Angeles for the year 
1911, 1121 were due to carelessness — careU ss- 
ness in handling matches, carelessness with 
cigar and cigarette stubs, carelessness in 
electric wiring, and carelessness of various 
other sorts, any of which with a little effort 
could be remedied. This means that the pro- 
gressive city of Los Angeles lost buildii gs 
with a total value of $1,386,992, all through 
carelessness. 

From statistics compiled by the National 
Board of Fire Underwriters, it appears that 
the fire loss in the United States for the last 
thirty-five years is $9,000,000,000. We must 



methods of prevention. 

We are fast turning away from the old 
wooden buildings, and in their place con- 
structing buildings of concrete, iron and 
brick. This is one of the most noticeable in- 
dications of an awakening. When a building 
is built of concrete or brick, with stairways 
and elevator shafts enclosed in brick shafts 
having fireproof doors; and the windows 
closed by wired glass and steel sashes in steel 
frames, it is not apt to burn very readily. 
The model fire resisting building is the mod- 
ern steel frame structure in which all steel is 
covered with not less than two inches of con- 
crete; concrete floors, steel frames and wired 
glass sash; stairway and elevator well in con- 
crete shafts, ano all wooden structural parts 



remember that this is absolute waste, which j eliminated, their places being taken by metal, 
can never be replaced. It is difficult to realize This is the building that tire will pass by. 
how such a loss could be possible, with all the Now that we have the fireproof building, 
fire departments and their extensive equip- we must consider the danger caused through 
ment. Here is where we are at fault. We j the use of electricity, gas, gasoline, coat oil 
think it would be absolutely impossible for a ' and other fuel oils, in producing heat, light 



building to burn and do not take the neces- 
sary precaution. Fire companies treat only 
the result. 

The per capita loss for the year 1911 was 
five times larger in the United Slates than in 
any European country. We Americans who 
lead the world in most respects, are far be- 
hind all other countries in methods of fire 
protection, and it is about time we were see- 
ing our position and bringing this neglected 
matter up to correspond with the rest of our 
high American standards. 

The disproportional high fire loss is due to 



and power. As kerosene is rapidly passing 
out of use, and asits hazards are well known, 
we will not stop to consider it. The really 
dangerous powers are gasoline and electricity. 
A great many of the large cities, for instance 
San Francisco, have prohibited the use of 
gasoline except under special permits. The 
fires due to electricity, are for the most part 
due to recklessness or neglect. 

But in case we have a fire, how can it be 
extinguished? There is no better way to put 
out a fire than through the use of water. 
Thrown from a bucket or fire engine, it will 



One of the things the average man knows 
little about is thechemistry of fire. He hears 
occasionally of fires from spontaneous com- 
bustion, but his ideas of the process of spon- 
taneous ignition are vague; and his knowledge 
of the substances or combinations of substan- 
ces susceptible to such ignition is limited. It 
is difficult to acquire the knowledge outside 
of the chemical laboratories; for in the com- 
mon run of experience unless fires from this 
cause are discovered at their inception they 
soon destroy all evidences of their origin. 
Such fires are commonly reported as "proba- 
bly incendiary," orof "mysterious origin." 

The chemistry of spontaneous ignition is 
simple. Decomposition is a slow combustion. 
The human body slowly burns to ashes in the 
grave. Oxygen uniting with carbon produces 
heat. If they unite rapidly enough, in suffi- 
cient quantities, the combustion is visible in 
flame. If they unite slowly, as in the decay of 
organic bodies, tbe heat escapes unnoticed. 
Rapid chemical action will start visible com- 
bustion as easily as the application of the 
torch. Vegetable oils spread over easily 
carbonized substances, such as cotton rags or 
waste will ignite the latter very quickly. The 
cotton fibre furnishes a sort of tinder. Ani- 
mal fats like tallow, butter and lard, espe- 
cially if rancid, will ignite under conditions 
similar to the above, but they are not such 
great offenders as the vegetable oils— cotton- 
seed, nut, castor bean, olive, and especially 
linseed. 

An oily rag or oily waste never should be 
thrown into a rubbish heap. Many fires start 
in closets from such rags after use in oiling 
floors or polishing furniture; and factory fires 
are occurring constantly from spontaneous 
ignition of turpentine and linseed oil on rags 
and waste. There are not many men who 
give the same thought to this danger in their 
homes that they give to it in their factories, 
where metal waste cans with self-closing 
covers are generally provided. At the time 
of spring renovations however, it is well to 
keep an eye upon'the domestic establishment, 
wit h this hazard in mind, as servants are gen- 
erally quite irresponsible. Products of petro- 
leum such as kerosene, gasoline and naphtha, 
although they do not ignite spontaneously. 
' have a hazard of their own. and rags soaked 
in them shouM hp carefully looked aftpr. A 
house rule should be marie that all greasy or 
: oily rags be burned in the cook stove without 
'■ delay. — Insurance and Investment News. 

The regular meeting of the Board of Fire 
I missioners was postponed to Monday at 4 p.m. 

Lieut. Ed. Kehoe, truck 5, is resting as com- 
fortably as is possible, with three broken ribs 
and an injured spine. He is at St. Joseph's 
Hospital. 



PACIFIC 1 FIREMAN 



Around the Bay. 

[Special Correspondence.] 

G. W. Moller, extraman on engine 4, was 
promoted to foreman of engine 16. Sixteen 
is the new company that will occupy the en- 
gine house at Thirteenth avenue and Hopkins 
street. The building has been completed for 
nearly two years, but the Oakland depart- 
ment did not have apparatus enough to install 
a company. 

The Oakland commissioners voted in favor 
of purchasing a new chemical fire engine of 
the American-La France Company, the price 
being $6000. Oakland now has four Seagrave 
chemical engines in use and two more ordered 
that have not as yet been delivered. 

Substitute J. Sullivan of the Alameda de- 
partment has been promoted to fill the va- 
cancy caused by the resignation of Driver 
Wm. Rhodes. Assistant Chief Millington 
was appointed fire marshal with I. W. Story 
and E. W. Northup as assistants. 

P. H. McVigar, who has been at the head 
of the Livermore department for several 
years, was again elected to fill the position of 
chief. 

Grass fires have kept the Oakland and Ala- 
meda departments on the run for the past 
, few days. None of the fires did any specjal 
damage. 

, The following men who recently passed the 
civil service examination were added to the 
Oakland department: Edward Mockel, hose- 
man; Charles Heinemann, foreman; J. Shif- 
lett, E. J. Hittenberger, A. H. MciKown, W. 
L. Heino, extramen. 



Another Pole Hole Accident. 

Last Wednesday morning Thos. McGlynn, 
loperator for Battalion Chief Murray, while 
walking in his sleep, fell down the pole hole 
at truck 11 and is now at St. Luke's Hospital 
suffering with a bad fracture of the right 
knee and the left ankle. Dr. Bodkin has 
charge of the case. Not very long ago Los 
Angeles had a similar accident, resulting in 
the death of the fireman. 

The current issue of the Fireman's Herald 
mentions a recent case in Chicago and sounds 
a timely warning in the following: 
' Lieut. Joseph T. Ballak of the Chicago fire 
department, would be alive to-day if the mur- 
derous sliding pole, with its long record of 
killed and injured, had been discarded long 
ago. as It should, have been. He went to his 
death in his sleep, answering an alarm which 
his nerves had given his brain. Down the 
pole hole he went, fracturing his skull on the 
apparatus floor, as other firemen have before 
him, and as still others, we fear, will in the 
future, unless thia relic of the dark ages is 
ahoushed. Ballak was a trained mall with a 
splendid record of service. His life is rather 
a hitter price to pav for the sliding pole. 

We have already taken occasion to say that 
it cannot be beyond American ingenuity to 
devise some means of getting liremen from 
the dormitory to the apparatus witli all, or 

nearly all, the B| d of the pole, hut without 

the pole's danger, a danger that is nut thee 



retical or. imaginary, "but iaetual and present, 
as the Chicago fatality proves. But there is 
an incomprehensible apathy on this subject, 
not alone among municipal authorities but 
apparently among firemen themselves. Per- 
haps the indifferenee^pf fche latter is due to the 
fact that the sliding pole, has been used so 
long that they regard it as a necessary and 
unmovable feature of the service, t<? be ac^ 
cepted as such. We cannot believe it is any- 
thing of the sort, though no change is proba- 
ble Until firemen themselves take the initia- 
tive and declare that the risks attendant upon 
going to and fighting fires are quite enough 
without endangerin'g their lives and limbs in 
the very fire stations themselves: 

If the need for a change were impressed 
upon municipal authorities there can be no 
doubt that investigation and experiment 
would disclose some reasonably efficient isub- 
stitute for the pole. For even if ! the substi- 
tute were a second ft?;two slower, the differ- 
ence can have no weight where the lives of 
men are in trie balance. Furthermore, muni- 
cipal authorities have no compunctions about 
limiting the speed of apparatus when re- 
sponding to alarms, thereby losing not a few 
seconds but many minutes. Why then'Should 
they object to a substitute for the slide pole 
which would cost but a few Seconds and safe- 
guard men's lives and limbs'? And again we 
say, it cannot be beyond American ujigenuity 
to devise a substitute that shall retain the 
speed* of the pole without its ever-present 
dangers. 

Autos Save Money for Middtetown. 

Chief Pitt of the Middletown fire depart- 
ment hcis^given out for publication a'ifaccount 
of the expanses connected with 1 running the 
Pope-Hartford auto chemical for the last two 
years, which may prove of interest to other 
cities. These figures show that the car has 
been a great money saver as compared to the 
expenses of maintaining sufficient horse- 
drawn apparatiift to takeHts place, j 

Tbe chemical has been in service in Middle- 
town for two years. During that time it has 
answered, 139 ala'rms of atJ kinds, including 
those by telephone. 

The actual expenditures for the two years 
have been as follows: 

Gasoline $S.',:',<) 

Oil * '- ] 

Tires 29.76 

Sundries [ 41.83 

i -■ 

Total $99.78 

In distinction to this is tin* expense of the 
keeping of horses for I he u.-e of the hook and 
ladder truck at headquarters and those at No, 
:! house. This expense for the sarin- time has 
been as follow s: 

Feed and hay $1,654 12 

Shoeing 18 i SB 

Veterinarian. . . 69 "I 

Total $1,909 II 

This shows a difference 0(41,808 ,':i in favor 
of the auto, taking no account of i he greater 
speed of the machine in reaching the scene 
of H fire. 'Insurance and Investment News. 



A Suggestion. 

There is no danger from a grass fire unless 
the wind is blowing hard. When the box is 
pulled four or five companies respond, to find 
nothing but a weed or two burning, and most 
of them ought to be burned. If the alarm is 
given by telephone only a chemical will re- 
spond. It is only a matter of the average 
citizen keeping cool 'when he sees a little 
grass fire and the wear and tear on the de- 
partment will not be, so great. 



New Duties for Firemen. 

The Salt Lake fire department has had 
novel service in two instances lately. In the 
first case a man was wedged between the 
elevator and a wall in the Hotel Utah. He 
was crushed todeath, and the fire department 
was called to tear down the wall and get out 
the body. In the other case, a horse fell 
through an air shaft in a stable belonging to 
George Canning. The animal was helpless on 
its back, and the department came to the 
rescue, rigged up a block and tackle and re- 
stored the equine victim to a position of safety 
and comfort. — Underwriters Report. 



Better Factory Protection. 



i 



Fjre Chief Murphy and Fire Marshal Towe 
have been requested- by the supervisors to 
-prepare an ordinance providing for regular 
Tire drills in factories during hours of employ- 
ment- . The matter of having all factories 
made'saffe for the employees is to be left 
with the board of fire wardens, consisting of 
the chief engineer, his assistants, the batta- 
lion chiefs and the fire marshal. It is pro- 
posed that each baltah'dri chief have the re- 
sponsibility of looking after all the factories 
in his district, have authority to order the 
owners or managers of such buildings to pro- 
vide sufficient fire escapes, convenient exits 
and whatever else might lie found necessary. 

Lieut. Frank Smith occasionally goes to the 
barber shop for a hair cut. "Do vou shave 
ydfirself all the time?" asked the barber. 
"No. I stop, occasionally for meals," said 
Smith savagely. 

In view of the building of a new pier at 
lleiniosa Beach as a result of the recent elec- 
tion which provided for a bond issue of 
$<;<>, Otm for that purpose, ii is planned to sell 
the old pier to some rriol ion picture compan] ■ 
The hurniiiL' of the old pier will make a spec- 
tacular picture, and it is planned to make lis 
destruction an occasion for a celehratiion as 

well. 



Tr|r„|,..„, IVjIu 1255 

L. J. tSORCK, meTAium 

M \KES A SPECIALTY OK 

FIRBMBN'S '.• UNIPORMS 

A l.si i FINE f/\ ll.IA.X SUITS 
93 EDDY STREET San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



Fire Prevention Hints. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Freah cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening. Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Reach NURSERIES, take Castro street car to 23rd. or 

Mission, 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Doug-lass and 24th streets. 



Phone, j Horn* C 2642 



rnon«, Ho[wS 3|74 



Serveau Bros. 

FLORISTS 

128 POST ST. 2110-2114 FILLMORE ST. 



Telephone 
Home C 2458 



Lamanet Bros. 

I* the place of all places to get the very latest and best in the way of 

Firemen's Regulation Shirts, 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

Hats and Underwear, Etc. 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



Cleaning up rubbish is much cheaper 
and much more satisfactory then clean- 
ing up ashes. Buckets are the cheap- 
est form of fire protection at first but 
costly in the end. The city that is 
cramping its fire department with re- 
duced appropriations, that is neglect- 
ing it alleys and cellars, that is con- 
tent with an inadequate fire alarm 
system, that city may find that large 
conflagrations grow from insignificant 
causes. —Exchange. 

Long Beach, Cal. — Plans are being 
discussed for a high pressure salt 
water system. The cost would be 
about $120,000 and would comprise 
pumps having a joint capacity of 2,000 
gallons per minute and a system of 
mains. 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



NA/M. F. EGAN 

M. R. C. V. S. 

..VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D.. 



1155 GOLDEN OATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. CaL 



Phone Mcrritt 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



THE TRIPP REMEDY CO. 

GUARANTEES TO CURE 

BLOOD POISON 

In every stage 

ACQUIRED OR HEREDITARY 

RHEU MAXISM 

ACUTE OR CHRONIC 

PARALYSIS ERYSIPELAS 

CATARRH SCROFULA 

MALARIA LUPUS 

DISEASES OF 
LIVER, KIDNEY AND BLADDER 
DISEASES PECULIAR TO WOMEN 

Call or Write to 

W. G. NOBLE 

Agent and Distributor 

832 Market St. San Francisco 



Phone Dougla. 3825 Phone Home C 2996 

MALERBI RESTAURANT 

MALERBI or FRUCOL1. Prop.. 
....First Class Wines, Liquors and Cigars.... 

Regular Week Day Merji. Noon 35 cenU. Evening 25 cents 
Sunday Meali 50 cenu up 

546 Front St. near Jackson San Francisco 



L. Lagomarsino 



Phone! Douglai 474 
Home J 1494 



J. Ghitardelli 



The New Popular 

Restaurant and Coffee Parlor 
Bakery and Confectionery 

French & Italian Cooking 
1 15-1 17 THIRD ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



Six hundred thousand Americans go abroad 
every year. 

Once the American tourist preferred a foreign 
watch. Now he goes to Europe with a Howard 
bought here — or comes back with a Howard 
bought there. 

He has an example in the ship's officer on 
the dock, who orders up the gang plank on 
Howard time. 

You find more and more of the responsible 
men carrying Howard Watches. 

The great railroads started it. The time in- 
spectors of 180 American railroads have officially 
certified and adopted the Howard. 

It is carried by leading technical men — by the 
heads of great Industrial and commercial en- 
terprises — by scientists — by army and navy 
officers and government officials. 

Many a man buys a Howard for the sheer 
pleasure of owning the watch that Is so well 
spoken of by men whose opinion he respects. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pay for It. 

The price of each watch Is fixed at the fac- 
tory, and a printed ticket attached — from the 
17-j,.wel i double roller i in a Crescent Extra or 
Boss Extra gold-filled case at $40. to the 23- 
Jewel at $160 — and the Edward Howard model 
at $350. ..„■«.! 

Admiral Slgsbee has written a little book. 
"The Log of the Howard Watch." giving the 
record of his own Howard in the V. 8. Navy. 
You'll enjoy it. Drop us a post-card. Dept. N, 
and we'll send you a copy. 
HOWARD WATCH WORKS, Boston. Mass 

T. H. K1LGO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 

71 WALLER ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 



the: 

PACIFICFIREMAN 

JOB DEPARTMENT 
IS NOW PREPARED TO PRINT 
LETTER HEADS 
BILL HEADS 
STATEMENTS 
ENVELOPES 
BUSINESS CARDS 
WEDDING INVITATIONS 
SHIPPING TAGS 
BILLS OF FARE, ETC 

479 TURK STREET 

Phone FRANKLIN 6867 



Phone Kearny 3523 Home C 1780 

JOE. H. ROSENBERG 

(Html anil fflilitarg Olailnr 

73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 
Louil Frankenberg. fonnerly with Roaenblum & Abraham. Manager 



Home phone S 2517 

The Little Emporium 

L. RIZNIC Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 
2296-98 GEARY STREET 

Tel ephone West 4824 Ntu BniM SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Dougla. 287 1 Home C 4992 

WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRANT BROKERS 

630 KEARNY STREET 

COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Home J 2549 

EMI L , SCHOBNBE1N 

Fireman Cap Maker 

Formerly ol 2 1 st and Folsom 
...WILLIAMS. : BUILDING- 
THIRD STREET 

Cor. Mission. Room 307 SAN FRANCISCO 




VOL. IX. -NO. 27 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 6, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Firemen Rescue Society Maids and 
Matrons. 



Miss Avis, one of the society maids 
who was rescued in the fire which 
broke out in an apartment house at 
3300 Clay street, early Saturday morn- 
ing, June 29, by Captain Lerman and 
his bunch of "smoke eaters," tells of 
her experience of being rescued from 
death in the Call, in an ingenuous, 
simple way as follows: 

"The fireman (alluding to Captain 
Lerman) just poked his ladder up to 
the window. I never took much in- 
terest in athletics before, but I did not 
want to be rescued, so I swung down 
and helped when they took the rest of 
the family out. 

"The ladder did not reach the 
ground, but any one could have made 
that jump, especially when— well, un- 
der the circumstances. It was night 
and we did not have time to dress. 

"I certainly must praise the firemen. 
They did grand work in taking the 
people from the windows when the 
hallway was choked with smoke. It 
really is a wonder that the whole house 
did not burn down." 

More thrilling rescues were made 
from a corner window of the apart- 
ment occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Chas. 
A. Marriner, their daughter, Mrs. 
Wallace Bert hoi I', and their neice. 13 
year old Kathryn Striekler. 

When Marriner was aroused and 
gave the alarm spurts of Hame were 
bursting through the carpet of the 
room occupied by Mrs. Rertholf. 
Blinding smoke made the entrance 
impassable, but they made their way 
to a front window high above the side- 
walk. While they were hesitating 



about jumping a ladder scraped the 
window. 

"This way, please," said Capt. Ler- 
man, appearing through the smoke. 

Time did not permit the formality of 
changing into street attire. The femi- 
nine members of the party were car- 
ried down the ladder by the husky 
firemen and neighbors provided ac- 
commodations for the refugees. 

Mrs. Marriner, one of the matrons 
who was rescued, when requested to 
give her experience, said: 

"There is not much to say about the 
fire, except to speak of the efficiency 
of the firemen. When we awoke the 
floor in my daughter's room was cov- 
ered with smoke and flames were com- 
ing through the carpet. 

"We were taken down the ladder 
by the firemen, and they did their 
work well, not only in the spectacular 
part of removing the people from the 
windows, but in stopping the fire. We 
moved back to-day, although last 
night I thought the whole house would 
burn." 

A Cat's Leg Causes Blaze. 

Four Hindus, partners in business, 
bought some cotton bales. That the 
rals might not destroy the cotton they 
purchased a cat. They agreed that 
each of the four should own a particu- 
lar leg of the cat, and each adorned 
with heads and other ornaments (he 
leg thus apportioned to him. The cat, 
by an accident, injured one of its legs. 
The owner of that member wound 
around it a rag soaked in oil. The cat, 
going too near the hearth, set this rag 
on lire and, being in great pain, 
rushed in among the cotton bales. 



where she was accustomed to hunt 
rats. The cotton thereby took fire and 
was burnt up. 

The three other partners brought a 
suit to recover the value of the cotton 
against the fourth partner who owned 
this particular leg of the cat. The 
native judge examined the case, and 
this was his decision: 

"The leg that had the oiled rag on it 
was hurt. The cat could not use that 
leg. In fact, it held up that leg and 
ran with the other three legs. The 
three unhurt legs therefore carried the 
fire to the cotton and are alone culpa- 
ble. The injured leg is not to be 
blamed. The three partners who 
owned the three legs with which the 
cat ran to the cotton will pay one- 
quarter of the value of the bales to the 
partner who was the proprietor of the 
injured leg." — London Telegraph. 

Under the head of "Volunteer vs. 
Paid," the Fireman's Herald of June 
22, says: "It is a pity that the above 
title is justified by existing conditions. 
It is greatly to be regretted that paid 
and volunteer firemen have adopted a 
superior, if not a contemptuous, atti- 
tude towards one another. Because 
fire fighting is the vocation of one and 
the avocation of the other furnishes a 
solid reason for good will and co- 
operation, and should not le the basis 
of mutual distruft." 

The new auto truck at Orange was 
satisfactorily demonstrated recently 
by F. C. Hirsch, representing the 
Seagrave Company 

The bids for a new engine house on 
Western avenue, Los Angeles, ran too 
high, and the plans are to be revised. 



I' A C 1 F 1 C 



1 K E M A N 



San Francisco Fire Commissioners 



The Board of Fire Commissioners 
met Saturday, June 29 (Commissioner 
Donohoe absent) and transacted the 
following business: 

Report of the Administrative Com- 
mittee on communications with re- 
commendations: 

From Thomas Magner, captain en- 
gine 20, requesting that he be granted 
a continuation of his leave of absence, 
with pay, for thirty days, commenc- 
ing on the 24th instant. Recommend 
be denied. 

From chief engineer, submitting a 
report from the superintendent of en- 
gines relative to the inferior quality 
of the coal furnished by Thos. Morton 
& Son under its contract and recom- 
mending that the demand for June Le 
withheld from approval until said firm 
replace the same with better quality 
of coal. Recommend be approved. 

From Alfred Girot, machinist at the 
corporation yard, requesting that le 
be granted a leave of absence for two 
weeks, without pay, commencing July 
1. Recommend be approved. 

From Walter J. Olsen, hoseman en- 
gine 7, requesting that he be granted 
a leave of absence for two months, 
without pay, commencing July 1 Re- 
commend be granted. 

From Harry Newman, truckman 
truck 11. requesting that he be allow- 
ed salary on account of injury to face 
and arm received while responding to 
an alarm of fire on the 16th instant. 
Recommend be allowed salary. 

From chief engineer, submitting re- 
port of suspension of August Engelke, 
captain fireboat 2, for being under the 
influence of intoxicating liquor while 
on duty on June 14. 1912. Youi com- 
mittee find after an investigation of 
this matter that there was not suffi- 
cient evidence to warrant the filing of 
charges against Engelke to establish 
his guilt, but that he was guilty of 
delinquency, and we are unable to de- 
termine if this was due to temporary 
mental aberation, and the chief engi- 
neer was directed to restore him to 
duty. 

From the city attorney, submitting 
an opinion in the matter of the appli- 
cation of A. L. Saunders for re- 
instatement in this department, from 
which he resigned in 1910, wherein 



he states that this Board has no juris- 
diction or power to re-instate Saun- 
ders as a member of the department. 
Filed and recommend application of 
Saunders be denied. 



gine Company, at the following prices: 
One 1st size boiler, $975.00; one 3rd 
size boiler, $925.00. 

The contract for furnishing one or 
more nozzles for the department was 
awarded to M. Greenberg's Sons, at 



From Thomas McGlynn. operator | the following figures: One or more 
Battalion No, 11, making application nozzles, each. $235.00. 



for salary on account of injuries to 
legs received by falling down pole hole 
at the quarters of his company on 
June 19, 1912. Recommend be allowed 
salary. 

From the Mayor's secretary, enclos- 



The Civil Service Commission certi- 
fied three hosemen from which one 
lieutenant was to be selected, as fol- 
lows: Joseph Burnett, B. F. Jones 
and Joseph M. Wood. The first two 
waived. 

Three lieutenants were certified by 

ing communication from A. L. Sum- th u e ? vU Se ™? e Com f mi f ion : f [°™ 
, . ... which one captain was to be selected, 

ders relative to his reinstatement in as f n )] ows: e. McCormiek, M. J. 
the department. Filed. Secretary to , McLaughlin and Thos. J. Kelly. The 
reply thereto. | first two waived. 

From chief engineer recommending 



Phone Kearny 3523 Home C 1780 

JOE. H. ROSENBERG 

(Ciuil anil iHUitary Sailor 

73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 
Louis Frankenberg. h'rmedy with Roienbliim fit Abraham. Manager 



that a tapper be placed at pier No. 44, 
where the fireboats go for fuel oil. 
Recommend be approved and the De- 
partment of Electricity requested to 
have tapper installed there. 

From Alfred Conniff, hoseman en- 
gine 39, for a leave of absence for | Home phone s 2517 
fifteen days, with, ut pay, commenc- The Little Emporium 
ing July 16. Recommend be granted. ' L. RlZNtc Proprietor 

From Edward Kehoe, lieutenant FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 
truck 5, making application for salary underwear a spkciakty 

... . , , . 2296-98 CiEARY STREET 

on account of miurv to ribs and spme . p„i_-i 

... -. « -r ,-v ■» iNear t rodent k 

while working at a fire June 21. Re- Telephone w«, 4824 san francisco 

commend salary be allowed. 

From Charles Cavigan. blacksmith T ' w °"' DW " 287 ' H " meC J" 1 2 

helper at corporation yard, making WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

application for salary on account of 



injury to leg received while working 
at corporation yard in March. 1911. 
Recommend be referred to department 
phvsician and surgeon for report. 

From M. J. Higgins, truckman truck 
4. requesting that he be granted a 
leave of absence for sixty days, with 
pay, on account of sickness, commenc- 
ing July 1. Rpcommend be granted. 

From superintendent of engines, 
submitting a report of employes of 
the corporation yard absent from duty 
during the past month. Filed. 

From the secretary of the Board of 
Fire Pens ; nn Fund Cotnmissiop*>rs, 
notifying Board that John McCluskey. 
2nd frsst. chief, has been retired on 
pension on account of full time of ser- 
vice, to take effect from Julv 1. 1912. 
FiW. 

From William Jeffers. lieutenan' 
engine 20. requesting that he be 
granted a leave of absence for one 
month, commencing July 1. with pay. 
on account of sickness. Recommend 
be granted. 

NEW BUSINESS. 

The contract for furnishing two 
boilers for fire engines was awarded 
to the American-La France Fire En- 



W A KRANT BROK E R S 

630 KEARNY STREET 
COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Home J 2549 

EMIL SCHOENBRIN 

Fireman Cap Maker 

Formerly of 21 si and Folsom 

WILLIAMS.. BUILDING... 

THIRD STREET 

Cor. Mission. Room 307 SAN FRANCISCO 



L. I .agnmar.-ino 



Phon« Dougbt 474 
Home J 1494 



J. Ghurardclli 



The New Popular 

Restaurant and Coffee Parlor 
Bakery and Conf jc.ionery 

Frincli cv> Italian ('unking 
115-117 THIRD ST SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Dough! 3825 Ph™- Home C 2996 

MALERBI RESTAURANT 

MALERBI 6t FRUGOLI. Propi. 
.First Class Wines, Liquors and Cigars ... 

Regular Week Day Meals, Noon 35 cents Evening 25 c-nuj 
Sunday Mealt 50 cents up 

546 Front St. near Jackson San Francisco 



V A C 1 K 1 C K1K E MAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Richard Bennett's farewell week at 
the Alcazar commences next Monday 
evening with a revival of Chas. Klein's 
great play of love and finance, "The 
Lion and the Mouse," in which the 
clever actor scored one of his earlier 
successes. Indeed, his impersonation 
of Jefferson Ryder, the autocrat-mill- 
ionaire's rebellious son, was the means 
of elevating him to stardom, for he 
originated the part and made so much 
of it that the New York critics gave 
him first honors in a roster embracing 
several prominent histrions. In the 
cast with him will be Mabel Morrison 
as Shirley Rossmore (her au revoir 
role), in which she made a pronounced 
hit last season at the Alcazar, and the 
full strength of the stock company 
appropriately|bestowed. Louis Benni- 
son will again impersonate John Bur- 
kett Ryder, in which character he won 
distinctive recognition when "The 
Lion and the Mouse" was last pre- 
sented in the Alcazar. A sumptuous 
pictorial production is promised. 

Empress Theatre. 

One of the most pleasing of musical 
offerings will be seen in "The Eight 
Saxones," the stellar attraction at the 
Empress commencing to-morrow af- 
ternoon. The Monarch Comedy Four, 
a quartet which has been cleaning up 
all along the circuit, will be the fea- 
tured attraction. One of the biggest 
hits as a comedienne when she ap- 
peared here before was Mary Dorr. 
Because of her success she was imme- 
diately rebooked at the conclusion of 
her tour. Another splendid feature 
will be presented by Princess Turkia 
and her company of Turkish dancing 
girls and Turkish Harem Orchestra. 
in her bare limbed art dance, "The 
Serpent Art Dance." Ted Gibson and 
a good supporting company will pre- 
sent the laughable college classic en- 
titled, "After the Game. " Al Brown, 
the well known composer, and Gertie 
Moullon will contribute some of their 
own hits including a piano-playing bit. 
The Grassi Brothers, European musi- 
cal acrobats, are making their Ameri- 
can debut with a novelty of music and 
acrobatic work, including an illusion- 
arv mirror. 



SEAGRAVE AERIAL 
MOTOR-DRIVEN HOOK AND LADDER TRUCK 





;J- =i 


TRs 


m — 1 ^ , 








S2E £ - 


*!?*r * r ~" VK jf ;r- - - ■• 


B^^L'Y Hi3' ^'UAt 


■ ' ^¥ 


s^j^L 


"3 


W W"~ 




■sJS£*?-- 






. — !_m^LM 





In service at Vancouver, B. C, Boise, Idaho, San Diego and Lcs 

Angeles, California. 

Territory covered by the 
Gorham Fire Apparatus Company, Inc. 



SEATTLE 
82 & 84 W. Marion Street 



Seagravc Representatives for the Pacific Slope 

SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont street 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 S. Clive StrMi 



Americ an Rubb er M fg. Co. 

9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories — Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 

WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 

Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hcsc, Erass 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Department Sujiplies 

When You're Buyin' Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 





L_. H. &, B. I. BILL 

file PACIFIC FIREMAN $2.00 a year. Sole Distributors for the Pacific Coast S4.? (lolden date Ave., San Francisco 



FACI F I C FIREMAN 



P 



•agih 




IREHAN 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all clieclts and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 

SUBSCRIPTION RA'IKS 

One year, in advance $2.00 

Six months 1.00 

ADVERTISEMENTS 

Inserted on the most favorable terms, especially large and 
continuous ones. 

Editorial Rooms and Business Office, "179 Turk Street. 
San Kvancisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 

Entered as second-class matter March 21, 1908, at the 
Postoffice at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act-: l 
Kress «>f March S. 1879. 

SATURDAY JULY B, 1912 

The scheduled meeting of the Fire < Jom- 
mission which was to take place Friday even- 
ing, was put over to Monday morning. 

A government official tells us that the aver- 
age life of a dollar bill is 14 months. Their 
average life with us is about 14 minutes. 

The new motor chemical truck, purchased 
recently by the Pasadena Fire Department, 
costing $6,000, arrived last week and has been 
assigned to the Mentor street house. 

From a late Seattle paper we find that the 
members of that department are busy emu 
lating petitions among the voters to have the 
proposition of double shift working hours 
substituted at the next election. The petition 
calls for two shi f ts of ten and fourteen hour«, 
the day men working from 8 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
and the night men from 6 p. m. to 8 a. m., 
the members of the shifts alternating hours 
on the first of each month. 

The two platoon system of Kansas City, 
which was to go into effect July 1, is meeting 
with opposition in one way or another. Ac- 
cording to the Fireman's Herald the matter 
is being passed up to the legal department for 
an opinion as to whether the 95 additional 
men to be appointed to the fire department 
to put the double system in vogue will have 
to be certified by the Civil Service Commis- 
sion John Donnelly, president of the Fire 
and Water Board, believes the new men will 
have to take a civil service examination. The 
Civil Service Commission has dodged the 
question and put it up the legal department. 

From a Spanish War Veteran. 

San Francisco, July 1, 1912. 

Editor Pacific Fireman. 

Dear Sir:— Permit me to address you a few 
lines and hope you will publish the same. On 
last Decoration Day the Veterans of the 
Spanish-American War connected with the 
police department were detailed as an escort 
to the Veterans of tpe Civil and Spanish War 
Veterans, and as a Veteran myself. I felt that 
the fire department could be well represented 
if the Veterans of the Spanish-American War 
connected with the fire department would 



only join some Camp and show the public that 
the fire department has men not alone fire 
fighters but fighters that the country can de- 
pend on in any crisis, and I have every reason 
to believe that our Board of Fire Commis- 
sioners and chief engineer would feel proud of 
us when we parade on Decoration Day. 

In conclusion, I wish to state to the Veter- 
ans of the Spanish War connected with the 
fire department that the Grand Encampment 
will be held in San Francisco in 1915. Hoping 
that every member of the San Francisco Fire 
Department, eligible in the Spanish-American 
War, will see that he becomes a memher of 
said organization. Before I close I wish to 
ask Mr. Preston to insert that all applications 
shall be sent to Camp McKinnon. I remain, 
Michael Dwyer, 
Engine 44. 3816 22nd Street. 

Election of Board of Directors. 

The following is the official ballot of the 
Widows' and Orphans' Aid Association of the 
San Francisco Fire Department, held June 
12th to 21st, 1912, inclusive: 

Bowlan, John, captain engine 45 142 

Brennan, ('has. J., lieut. truck 4 220 

Brown. Geo. F., captain engine 39 416 

Cahill, John, driver engine 26. 318 

Conlon, John J., battalion chief 314 

Conniff, D. R., FireCommissioners' office "99 

Conroy, John, captain engine 29 338 

Cullen Chas. J., captain engine 10 61 

Doherty, John, captain engine 40 65 

Gallatin, W. E., Jr.. captain engine 3 360 

Hain, Gustave, hoseman engine 40 20 

Horn, Henry F., retired battalion chief.. .355 

Jensen. Archie, hoseman engine 44 3S 

Kenney, John J., captain truck 12 6\ 

McGowan, John, captain truck 3. 42 

Mulligan, Eugene, engineer engine 42 36 

Murphy. Thos. J., battalion chief 344 

Shannahan, Jas. L., hoseman engine 13 267 

Smith, F. L . lieut. truck 2 118 

Los Angeles Fire News. 

At a meeting of the Fire Commission last 
Monday they approved the chief's appoint- 
ment from the eligible list of the Civil Ser- 
vice Commission of Charles L. Frazier as a 
fireman and Charles Peterson as an auto 
fireman. 

George E. Piatt, proprietor of Piatt's dairy, 
sent to the Fire Commission a check for $24 
for fire hose injured at the recent fire at his 
place and also a check for $25 for the Fire- 
men's Relief and Pension Fund, in recogni- 
tion of the able work done by the firemen at 
the fire. 

Chief Eley reported that there are now 387 
men on the pay roll of the department and 
there are fifteen volunteer members. 

The Commission also approved the rule that 
has just been established by Fire Chief Eley 
as to bed time for firemen. The rule reads: 
"That time of arising of members of the Fire 
Department shall be not later than 6 a. m., 
and for retiring after 8 and before 11 p. m." 

The boys of engine 21 last week told Emil 
Shoenbein that they didn't want any ventila- 
tors in their caps. Who is furnishing the air? 



Firemen Defeat Theatrical Employes. 

One of the most interesting as well as one 
of the most exciting games of base ball wit- 
nessed in a long time was played at Lobos 
Square, Thursday, June 27, between teams 
composed of firemen, playing under the name 
of "The Truck Four Aristocrats" and The 
Theatrical Employes of the Columbia Theatre. 

The firemen were successful in defeating 
the show boys by a score of 16 to 11. The 
large score does not. tell the tale of the game, 
as in every inning there were more or less 
exciting moments and the rooters of both 
sides were given lots of chance to root for 
their favorites. 

Starting with the first inning the show boys 
at the bat, they could do nothing with Com- 
ber's slants; after the first two strike outs 
the third man hit a high foul which Brennan 
caught after a hard run, making a spectacu- 
lar catch. After the firemen went to the bat 
the way they put it all over on the show 
boys' pitcher is a sad tale to relate, for when 
the inning was over the bell rang eight times 
for the fire laddies. 

The second inning started with Romer, a 
southpaw, in the box, Adams being taken out. 
Romer seemed to have the fire boys' number, 
as he let them down in 1-2-3 order. The show 
boys now began to find their batting eyes, 
and by getting a couple of runs in each inning, 
they tied the score in the sixth. 

In the seventh. Comber being hit by the 
pitcher while at the bat, was taken out by 
Captain Brennan and Collet t finished the 
game in the box, and also finished the show 
boys, as they could do nothing with his deliv- 
ery until the eighth inning when they got 
three runs. 

The firemen started the last two innings 
with another batting rally, the same as in 
the first, scoring eight more runs, making it 
16 to 11. 

There were many features to the game. The 
fielding honors were the catching by Brennan, 
the first base work by Lindeburg; Bowler and 
Church were also there with some tine 
fielding. 

The batting honors went to Shea and Bow- 
ler, the former making two home runs and 
the latter one; Church got four singles out of 
four times at bat. 

The following was the lineup: 
The Aristocrats Theatrecal Employes 

Brennan Catcher Burke 

Comber Pitcher .Romer 

Lindeberg 1st base Cash man 

Shea 2nd base Quirm 

Bowler 3rd base Smith 

Collett S. S Adams 

Church L. Field Barton 

Carter i'...R. Field Wilt-oil 

Lutz C. Field Forbes 



A fire in the California Opitical Company 
building at an early hour Friday morning, 
caused a loss of $6,000 to the building and 
three tenants. The fire for a time threatened 
to spread to the other floors, but owing to the 
splendid work of the firemen the flames were 
confined to the sixth floor. 



Fire Department Employes Dismissed. 

O-ving to lack of funds provided in the 
budget the Fire Commission, at a meeting 
held Saturday, June 29, dismissed eight em- 
ployes from the fire department corporation 
yard and stables, as follows: S. L. Richards, 
machinist; J. S. Charcho, blacksmith; J. 
Carol, h lack smith helper; Richard Cole, 
blacksmith finisher; B. Silva, drayman; P. 
Whalen and P. Dougherty, hostlers; H. Sterl- 
ing, carriage painter. 

The Commission appointed Mark H. Jacobs, 
civil service eligible, as a hoseman in the de- 
partment. 

A complaint received from the Civil Ser- 
vice Commission that Superintendent of En- 
gines Bermingham was a non-resident was 
taken under advisement. 



1' A C 1 ■ 1 C K 1 K E M A N 

about than another it is making cake, for he 
can make it without flour or eggs, so it must 
be good. He wants all of his friends to try 
some of it. But Johnnie does not tell you 
what hospital he is pulling for. 
From Some op His Old Firemen Friends. 



Where's Captain Wralty ? 

He's humped up in his garden 
Pulling up all the weeds. 

And wondering what became 
Of all his garden seeds. 



Captain Skelly and family, in their Pierce- 
Arrow auto, have gone to Guerneville, to put 
in his vacation. 



Around the Bay. 

[Special Correspondence.] 

Richmond is planning on installing a new 
automatic fire alarm system. 

Oakland celebrated a "safe and sane 
Fourth," the firing of firecrackers an'd sky- 
rockets was prohibited so the members of the 
department had a quiet day of rest. 

A fire early Friday morning in the Bachel- 
der rooming house, Oakland, damaged the 
contents of several stores in the building to 
the extent of $75,000. The blaze, it is said, 
resulted from defective wiring. Firemen had 
to break down the doors of several rooms in 
the rear apartments from the upper floor of 
the building to awake the people who were 
sleeping there. Many thrilling rescues were 
made by the fire fighters, 

Ahmedii celebrated in the good old fashion 
way. Chief Steinmetz ordered all dry grass 
grubn-d away from surrounding buildings. 
The department has been kept on a eon tin U 
o is run during the past few weeks pulling 
oit grass fires, so an ordinance has been in- 
troduced making itcompuls try to clear vacant 
lots and si.iewalks of grass. 

San Leandro will vote on the issuance of 
bo. ids to the extent of $50,000. Should the ' 
bonds carry, as they no doubt will, a new I 
combination chemical will be purchased, and | 
a modern tire alarm system wbl be installed. 

Joseph Mart of the Alameda depart men I is 
suffering from muscular rheumatism and 
lumbago. 

Frank Lewis of the Webb avenue fire house 
is also on the sick list. 



Capt. Geo. F. Brown of engine 39 received 
416 votes for Director at the recent election 
of the Widows Orphans' Aid Association — the 
highest on the list. 



It is rumored that Geo. Racehorn of truck 
12 is soon to become a benedict. He is taking 
lessons from Frank Morgan, but Vocke is the 
father of them all. 



The late reports from St. Joseph's Hospital 
is that Lieutenant Ed. Kehoe was able to sit 
up, and in a few days, it is thought, will be 
able to walk around the yard. 

At a meeting of the Pension Board held 
last Monday evening, pensions were granted 
to M. J. Farlev, B. F. Currier, Mrs. Anna 
Buckley and Mrs. Minnie Miskel. 

Frank Morgan of engine 'SO was united in 
marriage to the daughter of Captain Bow Ian 
June 5. May prosperity and happiness be 
their lot is the wish of the Pacific Fireman. 



Testinonial to Engineer Douglas. 



<>f the Pacific fireman. 

ou please publish the fo|- 



T«»Jus K Muck Fdltt 

Dear Sir:- Will 
tow in<r. iinil oblige: 

M'\ .Infill potiifla", engineer of entire :::. 
)i ,.-. ht-eii u |'|i Died tiu,hl months' leave of ab- 
sence with his annual vacation. He has char- 
tend l he park [vanhoe lo leave Alviso on 
July 10, to visit his relatives in Hoboken, 
Sweden and Ireland, and expects to be buck 
in lime t.o erect a ga .oline engine in the Fair 
grounds to run a peanut machine while they 
are building the fence out there. Johnnie 
says he will show them how to cook. Now, 
if there is anything that Johnnie knows more 



There's the keenest kind of rivalry between 
Captain Riley and Captain Eversnn to see 
who'll get to a box first. "Buck" says the 
apparatus doesn't go fast enough to suit him. 

Archie Jensen of engine 44, who received 
38 votes for Director in the Widows and Or 
phans' Aid Association at the rtcent election, 
says if his motorcycle had not broke down he 
could easily have more than trebled his vote. 

There is great need of private fire protec- 
tion, but most people don't seem to realize it; 
they think if they live within a mile of a file 
department and carry two or three hundred 
dollars insurance that they are immuned 
from lire. 

The Truck 4 Aristocrats base ball team ex- 
pect to cross bats with a nine, wlo-e nam. 
we did not leal ii, at Goal Island the corning 
week. It will be a fine tailing lor l he boys, 
also their wives ami swi elheariss. A.- k Bfi n 
nan for date of game. 

" Hurry, i te; m, ' said Cv\ li.in Lei rot v u 

one ol I he (society bells be was revelling al 

the recent Clay street fire. "Oh. but I must 
kiss my sister; I may never see her alive 
agrin." "Come on; I'll tend to that," said 
the gallant captain. 

At the Ancient Order of llil>< mil na' picnic 
al Sclnieizeii Park last Thursday, it jual tool, 

Seventeen IllillUleS for I he lil'e fight elV 1 ut; 

of-vvar team to pull the "finesi" over the 



line. This is the second time the firemen 
have put it all over the cops. 

If you would like this paper every we* k for 
a year, make a noise like $2 and its yours. 

Be decent. Don't try to get the other fel- 
low's ^oat. It may be all the goat he has. 



Frank E. Howard, writing fiom Evanston, 
Illinois, says: "Tell Captain Gill if he don't 
write to me I will have to come out there and 
knock his block off." He also wants to be 
remembered to Chief Dolan, Captain Whita- 
ker. Engineer Welch and all the old-timers 
of engine 15. 



Fire Chief Kenney of Berkeley was on this 
side of the bay Wednesday on business, 
visiting friends in this department. Owing 
to his having shaved his mustache off, which 
has improved his looks and having gained 
somewhat in weight, we failed to recognize 
him at first. 



A male heir to the Jim Ward's millions, 
engineer of engine 44, arrived Wednesday, 
June 26. He weighed very near ten pounds 
and is a "hum dinger." He has taken up his 
residence with the family. We feel confident 
that he will make a good fireman because he 
is such a mild tempered little fellow. 

The election of Jas. L. Shannahan, hoseman 
engine 13, as one oi the nine Directors of the 
Widows and Orphans' Aid Association, is evi- 
dence that he has a host of frit nds in the de- 
partment; especially when it is known he has 
only been a member five years. His many 
friends kept the wires ho* when the vole was 
announce d. congratulating him. 



It's wonderful the hard luck seme people 
are up against. Now there's Ho>< m; n Phil 
Muri h\ of en fine IS. whoseurcle in Chili hao 
to go and shuffle i ft" this mortal i oil and leave 
Phil an estate worth over $11. 0C0, and to lop 
the climax his wife last Sunday nit 1 t pre- 
seniel him with twins— two fine bouncing 
baby nova. It never rains bul it pours, holds 
good in Phil's case. Notwithstanding all ins 
hard luck, Phil is the happiest man in the 
Mission. 

Engineer Kinnev of lire boat 2. who gets 
his eats at the Popular restaurant oil Third 
street, sa\s: 

"I can eat tough steak 

And soup I hat 's be* n. 

But I W.Mi't eat 

O l-e o m-a r-g-a r i-n-e; 

O.i -lack o' bucks iir biscuit 

Ii nrd* no zeM , 

So bear me now 1 will I vow, 

Have Inii i er of t he heal . " 

I rlcphone Douglai 1255 

L. J. BORCK, « Ml TAILOR 
MAKES A SPEC1AI TV OF 

FIREMEN'S '. • UNIFORMS 

ALSO FINE CIVILIAN SUITS 
93 EDDY STREET San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening. Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Reach Nurseries, take Castro street ear to 23rd. or 

Mission. 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24 th streets. 



PU. I Dou«uu 4934 
""""I Hone C 2842 



Phonei 



1W01 . 586 
I Home S 3174 



Serveau Bros. 



FLORISTS 



128 POST ST. 



2110-2114 FILLMORE ST. 



Telephone 
Home C 2458 



Lamanet Bros. 



Is ihe place of all placet to get the very latest and best in the way of 

Firemen's Regulation Shirts, 
Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

Hats and Underwear, Etc. 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



NA/iVI. F. EGAN 

M. R. C. V. S. 

..VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D.. 



1155 OOLDEN OATE AVE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 

Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue, Oakland 

THE TRIPP REMEDY CO. 

GUARANTEES TO CURE 

BLOOD POISON 

In every stage 

ACQUIRED OR HEREDITARY 

RHEU MATISM 

acute or chronic 

paralysis erysipelas 

catarrh scrofula 

malaria lupus 

diseases of 
liver, kidney and bladder 
diseases peculiar to women 

Call or Write to 

W. G. NOBLE 



Agent and Distributor 



832 Market St. 



San Francisco 



At Fredricksburg. 

Recited by the Editor at the closing days of school at the 
Harrison Street School. Chicago. 

It was just before the last fierce charge 
Two soldiers drew their rein, 
For a parting- word and a touch of hand 
They might never meet again. 

One had blue eyes and sunny curls 

And a smile like morning light. 

The other was dark and stern and 

proud, 
But life was all the world to him. 

They had ridden together in many raid, 
They had fought in many a fight, 
But ever till now they had met the foe 
With a calm and hopeful smile. 

We'll ride together up the hill 
But you'll ride back alone, 
And promise a little trouble take 
When I am dead and gone. 

You'll face upon my breast, 

I'll wear it into the fight, 

With soft blue eyes and sunny curls 

And a smile like morning light. 

Like morning light was her love to me, 
It glading a lonely life; 
Little 1 cared for the frowns of fate 
When she promised to be my wife. 

Oh, write to her Charlie when 1 am 

gone, 
Send back that fair fond face, 
Tell her tenderly how I died 
And where is my resting place. 

Oh, tell her my soul will wait for hers 

In the border land between; 

It will not be long till she comes I ween. 

Tears dimmed the blue eyes of the boy, 
His voice was low with pain; 
I'll do your bidding comrade mine 
If I ride back again. 

But if you come back and I am dead 

You must do as much for me, 

My mother at home must hear the 

news, 
Oh, write to her tenderly. 

One after another are those she's loved. 
She buried a husband and son; 
I was the last when my country called, 
She kissed me and sent me on. 

She's prayed at home like a waiting 

saint. 
With her fond face white with woe, 
Her heart will be broken when I am 

gone, 
I shall see her soon I know. 

Just then the order came to charge, 



For an instant hand touched hand, 
Eye answered eye and 
On they rushed that brave devoted 
band. 

Straight they went toward the crest of 

the hill 
But the rebels with shot and shell 
Ploughed rifts of death through their 

toiling ranks 
And jeered them as they fell. 

They turned with a horrible dying yell. 
The heights they could not gain, 
But the few whom death and doom had 

spared 
Came slowly back again. 

But among the dead whom they left 

behind 
Was the boy with the curling hair 
And the stern dark man who rode by 

his side 
Lay dead beside him there. 

There's none to write to the blue eyed 

girl 
The words that her lover said 
And the mother who waits for her boy 

at home 
Will hear that he is dead. 

She never will know the last fond 

thoughts 
That sought to soothe her pain 
Until she crosses the river of death 
And stands by his side again. 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



Six hundred thousand Americans go abroad 
every year. 

Once the American tourist preferred a foreign 
watch. Now he goes to Europe with a Howard 
bought here — or comes back with a Howard 
bought there. 

He has an example in the ship's officer on 
the dock, who orders up the gang plank on 
Howard time. 

You find more and more of the responsible 
men carrying Howard Watches. 

The great railroads started it. The time ln- 
spectors of 180 American railroads have officially 
certified and adopted the Howard. 

It is carried by leading technical men — bv the 
heads of great industiial and commercial en- 
terprises—by scientists — bv army and navy 
officers aiul government officials. 

Many a man buys a Howard for the sheer 
pleasure of owning the watch that is so well 
spoken of bv men whose opinion he respects. 

A Howard Wat:h is always worth what you 
pav for it. 

The pi ice of each watch is fixed at the fac- 
tory, and a printed ticket attached — from the 
17-jewe] (double roller) in a Crescent Extra or 
Rnss Extra goId-*Mled case at ?4\ to the - 
jewel at {ISO—and the Edward Howard model 
it >:'■:■" 

Admiral Sigsbee has written a little book. 
"The Log of the Howard Watch." giving the 
record "f his own Howard in the U. S. Navy. 
You'll enjoy it. Drop us a post-card. Dept. N. 
and we'll send you a cors - . 
HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston, Mass 



T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 
71 WALLLR ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 




VOL. IX. -NO. 28 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 13, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Improved Fire Protection in 
New Orleans. 

[Loui* A. Dodge in American City.] 

Staggering under the burden of an 
excessive insurance rate which was 
declared to amount to approximately 
$10,000,000 overcharge for the state 
in 27 years, the citizens of New Or- 
leans in 1909 took steps to improve its 
fire protection and reduce its insur- 
ance. As a result of these efforts fire 
protection has improved until now, 
according to the reports of the Na- 
tional Board of Underwriters and sta- 
tistics compiled by State Fire Marshal 
B. P. Sullivan, the city stands in the 
very front rank as a safe city from an 
insurance standpoint. 

How this improvement in fire pro- 
tection was brought about was very 
simple, and certain conditions favored 
the reformation entirely apart from 
the efforts of the citizens to reduce 
the fire rates. Just ahout the time 
that the Progressive Union and the 
New Orleans Board of Trade began 
Agitating the subject. New Orleans 
bad recently begun enjoying the bene- 
fits of its new and splendid water 
supply system. This plant, munici- 
pally owned and operated, controlled 
by the Sewerage and Water Board, a 
b >dy of thirt $en citizens serving with- 
out pay. has a capacity for a popula- 
tion of 800.000. A standard pressure 
of 75 pounds to the square inch at the 
plant is maintained continuously, and 
at points six miles from the plant tests 
have shown a pressure of W pounds. 
The water is drawn direct from the 
Mississippi river, an absolutely inex- 
haustible source. The plant has a 



daily capacity of pumping 97,000.000 
gallons of water per day, and the 
filters, which transform the muddy 
Mississippi water into a fluid as clear 
as rain water and positively whole- 
some, have a capacity of 63,000,000 
gollons per day. Not only is the water 
plant there with an entirely adequate 
supply, but should some unforeseen 
accident— a most unlikely possibility, 
because the pumping machinery is in 
duplicate — prevent the waterworks 
from operating, water could be pump- 
ed direct from the river in sufficient; 
quantities to combat any ordinary con- 
flagration. Other factors that contri- 
bute indirectly to the low fire loss were 
the improvements in paving, enabling 
quick response of the fire apparatus, 
and the adoption of a building code 
prohibiting dangerous constructions. 

New Orleans is a city that should 
be considered safe from a physical 
standpoint. With its area of 212 
square miles there is no congestion of 
buildings. Beyond the central or 
business area, out in the residence 
districts, the majority of houses stand 
alone, surrounded either by an ample 
garden or at least a sufficient alley- 
way. 

One of the first steps towards bet- 
ter facilities was a demand for im- 
provement in the fire department. 
While the old volunteer organization 
was proud of its recoid, and had done 
hemic woik in the protection of the 
city for hall' a century, there were 

en tuin weaknesses in the organiza- 
tion thai it took years In weed nut ill 
the paid force. Up t" the time of the 
transfer the volunteer depart m< nl had 

! n a prolific element for the con- 



struction of political power. It pa- 
raded every fourth of March with en- 
gines and other apparatus gorgeously 
decorated with flowers and ribbons, 
and the firemen with their red or 
white shirts of immaculate flannel 
marched as proudly as a conquering 
army; in fact, the parade of the fire- 
men was second only to the magnifi- 
cent carnival pageants, and some con- 
sidered it as superior. 

Gradually the element of show and 
personal agrandizement was elimi- 
nated from the department, and the 
committees of citizens and insurance 
agents who conferred with the mayor 
demanded a still further improve- 
ment. They asked that all decrepit 
and superannuated firemen on the ac- 
tive rolls be retired, and that a disci- 
pline comparable with that of the 
United States army be established. 
This has practically been done. They 
also demanded that a central fire sta- 
tion be erected in the heart of the 
business district. This has not yet 
been accomplished, but the plans are 
now in the hands of the city architect 
and will be completed soon. This will 
afford additional protection. Further 
improvement was made in obtaining 
more powerful engines; the depart- 
ment has also kept pace with the im- 
provement of motor-driven apparatus 
and is rapidly adopting self-propelled 
hose wagons and chemicals to replace 
the horse-drawn vehicli s. 

Fire Chief Louis Pujol, who suc- 
ceedi il Thomas O'Connor, who had 
served at the head of both volimtei r 
and i aid dei artments for nearly I nlf 
i century, has made a good record 
ince he I as been in office. PI 
ciencj of I he departmenl is shov 
i he records of his office, in 1 hat of the 
576 alarms in L911, including 21 false 
alarms and 17 unnei 516 tires 

were confined to the buildings in which 
hej originated, r>nl> 32 extending 
bevond, and bul 28 got beyond ad- 
joining premises. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



San Francisco Fire Commissioners 



The Board of Fire Commissioners 
met Tuesday, July 9 (Commissioner 
Donohoe absent) and transacted the 
following business: 

Report of the Administrative Com- 
mittee on communications with re- 
commendations: 

From chief engineer, recommend- 
ing that the Department of Electricity 
be requested to install fire alarm boxes 
as follows: Box 829, Railroad avenue 
and Van Dyke; box 881, Fifteenth and 
Dolores streets; box 891. Grove and 
Lyon streets. Recommend for ap- 
proval. 

From chief engineer, recommend- 
ing that the following applications for 
transfers be granted, to take effect 
from July 1. 1912: Silvio Rocco, from 
captain engine 12 to captain fire boat 2; 

A. Engelke, captain fireboat 2 to 
captain engine 12. Recommend be 
granted. 

From chief engineer, submitting re- 
port from the Superintendent of En- 
gines relative to the probationary 
terms of John T. Regan, H. E. Iburg, 

B. A. Davis and D. J. Byrnes as 
watchmen at the corporation yard. 
Recommend by placed on file. 

From City Attorney Long, advising 
Board that he has completed the pur- 
chase of a lot of land on the northwest 
corner of Wilde and Girard streets for 
this department. Recommend be 
placed on file. 

From Jos. T. Curley, representing 
the Municipal Civil Service Employes 
Association, submitting a certified 
copy of affidavit of Samuel Berming- 
ham, relative to his resignation in 
Alameda county in 1908. Recommend 
be taken under advisement. 

From chief engineer, submitting a 
'. report relative to W. Gallatin, Jr., 
captain engine 3, failing to respond to 
an alarm of fire with his company on 
June 29. Your committee investi- 
gated this complaint and found the 
facts to be as stated, and recommend 
that Gallatin be reprimanded. 

From chief engineer, submitting a 
complaint relative to Julius Phillips, 
lieutenant chemical 3, failing to re- 
spond to an alarm of fire with his com- 
pany on June 29. Recommend be 
reprimanded. 

From Glen Park Improvement Club, 



relative to the erection of a fire house 
in that district. Recommend be taken 
under advisement, and the secretary 
directed to reply as to appropria- 
tion, etc, 

From G. T. Rupp, hostler at the de- 
partment stables, tendering his resig- 
nation as hostler, to take effect from 
August 1. Recommend be accepted. 

From Sheriff Eggers. requestingthe 
transfer of four horses to his depart- 
ment. Recommend be referred to 
chief engineer. 

From chief engineer, submitting a 
report from Acting Battalion Chief 
Grote, relative to Captain Frank Ler- 
man of engine 23 rescuing a woman 
from a burning building on June 29. 
Recommend be referred to Commitee 
on Actf ©f Valor for investigation and 
report. 

From chief engineer, submitting 
monthly report relative to the condi- 
tion of the men, apparatus, etc., of 
the department in general. Recom- 
mend be placed on file. 

From chief engineer, submitting re- 
port from Hydrantman Rice relative 
to a hydrant of the department on the 
north side of Geary street, between 
Steiner and Pierce, being broken by 
an automobile of the Breuner Furni- 
ture Company, on the 1st instant, cost 
of new hydrant $90. Recommend that 
claim for that amountbe submitted to 
Breuner Furniture Company. 

From chief engineer, submitting a 
complaint relative to Lieut. Howard 
Holmes of engine 4, failing to observe 
the rules of the Assignment Book re- 
lative to putting his company in ser- 
vice on the 29th ultimo. Your Com- 
mittee investigated this complaint and 
found the fact to be as stated therein, 
and recommend that Lieut. Holmes be 
reprimanded. 

From chief engineer, submitting 
list of apparatus and equipment lent 
to the authorities of Daly City for fire 
fighting purposes. Recommend action 
be approved. 

From Mark L. Jacobs, probationary 
hoseman appointed at the last meeting 
of the Board, tendering his resigna- 
tion as a member of the department, 
to take effect from July 1. Recom- 
mend be accepted. 

• From chief engineer, recommend- 
ing that requisition be made on the 



Civil Service Commission for three 
hosemen and one hostler. Recommend 
be approved and so ordered. 

From chief engineer, submitting 
copy of communication forwarded 
Board of Supervisors relative to more 
adequate water supply for fire protec- 
tion purposes for the western portion 
of the Richmond district. Recommend 
for approval. i 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

From the Civil Service Commission, 
requesting Board to investigate coin- 
plaint against Samuel Beimingham 
relative to residential qualifications. 
Mr. Bermingham, under oath, testi- 
fied that he was born and raised in 
San Francisco, had always voted in 
San Francisco, with the exception of 
the year 1908, when he registered in 
Oakland because he was then living 
for a couple of months on his wife's" 
property in Alameda county, but the 
nature of his work as marine engineer 
kept him occupied about San Francisco 
and he did not remember voting that 
year. He then went East on a visit 
and has always maintained his resi- 
dence in San Francisco. 

From the Gorham Engineering and 
Fire Apparatus Company, requestiag 
an extension of a few additional days 
on its contract for delivery of a hook 
and ladder truck. Granted extension 
of ten days from July 6. 

From the Civil Service Commission, 
certifying the following eligibles for 
appointment in the department: As 
hosemen— W. J. McKenna, L. J. Mur- 
phy and B. Schaefer. As substitutes— 
T. R. V. Kragen. J. J, Woods, R. 
Hutchinson and V. C. Dupuis. As 
watchmen— Vincent Bello. 

From chief engineer, recommend- 
ing that bids be invited for furnishing 
a card system of company assignments 
in lieu of the book system now in 
operation. Approved. 

Resolution dismissing certain tem- 
porary employes of the fireboat com- 
panies as follows: L. A. Strand, fire- 
boat 1; A. J. Barrett, fireboat 3 and 
J. Moreno, fireboat 3. Adopted. 

Resolution making temporary ap- 
pointments to positions in fireboat 
companies was adopted as follows: 
Wm. Olsen, pilot: W. D. Sullivan, en- 
gineer; F. W. Leahy, engineer; J. 
Lowe, engineer; W. J. Tallent, fire- 
man; W. J. Hogan, fireman. 

Resolution rescinding the action of 
the Board in dismissing P. Whalen. 
hostler at the department stables, was 
adopted. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Bessie Barriscale's engagement at 
the Alcazar, commencing next Mon- 
day night and continuing two weeks, 
promises to be the most profitable ven- 
ture undertaken in the O'Farrell street 
home of drama, for the advance de- 
mand for seats is unprecedentedly 
strong. While this is sterling proof 
of Miss Barriscale's artistic .worth and 
personal popularity, the fame of her 
opening vehicle, "The Rose of the 
Rancho, " must also be given some of 
the credit. Indeed, the local reputa- 
tion of the actress and the play are to 
some extent interdependent, as she 
is the only person who has interpreted 
the title role in San Francisco. Her 
first appearance under Belasco & 
Mayer's management was as Juanita, 
and the hit she scored was responsible 
for her retention as the Alcazar's 
ingenue throughout three seasons. 
Since then she has ascended to star- 
dom, being engaged to lead in a high- 
price production next September on 
Broadway. "The Rose of the Rancho" 
will be, presented during the week 
only, as "Smith," a delicious English 
comedy in which Miss Barriscale made 
her greatest recent success, is to be 
the medium of her farewell appear- 
ances. 



Empress Theatre. 

"High Life in Jail," will be the 
offering at the Empress Sunday after- 
noon, with William "Bill" Mack as 
the featured comedian. Given with a 
wealth of bucolic realism Harlan E. 
Knight and a capable company will 
present "The Chalk Line," by Una 
Clayton, a rural bit through which no 
end of subtle* rustic comedy h heard. 
A feature of interest will be the offer- 
ing of Olivotti Troubadours, the mu- 
sical sons of sunny Italy, who will de- 
light with their excellent musical 
offering. A screamingly laughable 
roller skating novelty of real ingenui- 
ty will be presented by the Four 
Mayos, who are continental roller 
skating comedians. Harry Cutler, 
the popular and well known comedian, 
will entertain with his pleasing come- 
dy and tuneful singing. Mclntyre 
and Groves, the comedians with a 
bunch of bright and glittering humor, 
interspersed with songs. Irene Moore 
and? Eleanor Sieger, will offer, dainty 
and. pleasing songs, dances and piano 
playing. The movingpiclures for the 
coming week will offer the usual high 
class material. 



SEAGRAVE AERIAL. 
MOTOR -DRIVEN HOOK AND LADDER TRUCK 




In service at Vancouver, B. C, Boise, Idaho, San Diego and Lcs 

Angeles, California. 

Territory covered by the 
Gorham Fire Apparatus Company, Inc. 



SEATTLE 
82 & 84 W. Marion Street 



Seagrave Representatives for the Pacific Slope 
'■'• '' SAN FRANCISCO 

48 Fremont Street 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 S. Olive Street 



American Rubber Mfg, Co. 

9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Main Office and Factories — Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 



WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE ' OF 



Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose, liniss 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Department Supiiiics 

When You're Buyin' Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

J^feftsa m t° y° ur motor (and your purse) to 

feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 

to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

1_. H. &. B. I. BILL 

Sole Distributors for the Pacific Coast 543 Golden Gate Ave., San pranclsco 





PACIFIC FIREMAN 




PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY ... 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

hum all checks and money orders should 
be made payable. 
H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 
One year, in advance 






:•■_' 00 
. 1.00 



ADVEl;'ri!sEMENT,s 

Inserted on the most favdrabli terms, ially largeand 

owitinualu ■■!" 



Editorial I; ' 179 Turk Street, 

San Francisco. Telephone f'ranl.l. 



Entered 86 
Poatoffice at Cat. under the Act 

:. 1879. 



SATURDAY .1 1'l.Y 13. 1912 



The New York Fire Department includes 
4,350 uniformed men and a Heel of boats that 
protect 153 miles of water froi 

The Nott engine which is to he delivered to 
Oakland after two years delay, was put 
through its paces in San Franciseb Thursday 
afternoon. 



ing submitted for action by the full Board at 
regular meetings. How or why this is so is 
up to the office force. 



The big Seagrave truck arrived Thursday. 
Owing to some mismanagement of tin- rail- 
road its delivery has been delayed. It left 
ilms June 16 and should have arrived 
July 6. It did not pass Ogden until 
July 7, arriving in Oakland July 11, over the 
Southern Pacific. After being tested it is 
thought it will be assigned to the O'Farrell 
I house. Ed. Lamb is acting as tiller- 
man during the trvouts. 

At a special session of the Hoard of Super- 
visors Tuesday several appropriations were 
passed, among them an appropriation for the 
construction of an engine house on Twfll't h 
avenue, south of Geary street, $21,000; and 



thirteen new hydrants with double four-inch 
outlets at various points within thi 
district, and also that ninety hydrants with 
two-and-one-half-inch outlets be installed by 
private water companies at various points 
within the districts that they serve. It is es- 
timated that these ninety hydrants will cost 
$23.05 each. 

Th.- Fire Commission considered a proposi- 
tion to require the Union Hollywood Water 
Company to install a six-inch main on Melrose 
avenue from Vermont avenue to Virgil street 
four inch main southerly on Virgil 
to Middleberry street. The proposition 
was referred to the chief for further investi- 
gation, but the commission considered the 
subject favorably. 

The Fire Commission appointed H. C. Steve 
and E. H. Henry firemen from the civil 



lor the purchase of lead for calking joints of v j ce lists, and E. L. Lewis, assistant horse- 
the high pressure water system, $19,000? also shoer for the department. 



The Fire Commission recommended that 
the Board of Public Works should take charge 
of the construction of the engine house de- 
sirer. for Western avenue is the attitude of 
the; Fire Commission, expressed recently, in 
the indorsement of a statement made hy Fire 
Eley to this effect. The chief stated 



Sweeping advances were recently made in 
the Los Angeles Firemen's Pension Fund in 
the granting of pensions to firemen, their 

widows and orphans by the city council. 

i 

A late Portland Ore., press dispatch says 
Josephine Gibson, waitress, was fined $"n for 
turning in fake lire' alarms. She told the 
judge firemen put her up to it, as they tf 
the limelight incident to their responsi to 
alarms. 



-I. for plans and specifications for the 

street tank and the telephone lines of 
the high pressure system. 

At the meeting of tie- Fire Commission held 
Tuesday evening, Mr. Greeiiherg of Green- 
berg Sons, mpiested that the firm he re: 
from their contract to furnish two nozzles 

for the fireboat tenders on account of a mis- that he had carefully reviewed the plans tor 
understanding of the specifications which re- the proposed structure and found that practi- 
quired a patented part that could only be cally nothing could be eliminated so as tore- 
I'urnished by paying" a royalty to a former, duce the cost without sacrificing most desira- 
city employe. The matter was referred to hie features, and that as the figures of btd- 
Commisajoatr Dilbn to investigate and re- d£rs were so high as to be pr-?h*»tive h 
commend. hevej th 

supervision. 



There is to be another attempt to establish 
the Two Platoon System in the New York 
City Fire Department. The members claim 
that it is a grevious, injury to health' to be 
required to do duty twenty hours a day for 
four consecutive days out of five. ' 

At 1 o'clock, early Monday morning, J[uly 
S, fire swept Tonopah, Key. The loss is esti- 
mated at $.,00.01111. The blaze start, d in the 
Knights of Pythias Hall. The Brokers' Ex- 
change building, one of the largest and finest 
business blocks, is a mass of ruins. 



Los Angeles Fire Commissioners. 

At a meeting of the Fire Commission Mon- 
da-Vj July S, Chief Eley showed in his w< 
report- that there we 46 alarms, 3 of which 
■ re false: 2,"> were grass fires, and in 10 
there was no loss. The estimated loss in the 
others was $11,000. Attention is ca 



vere so uie.il as iu ue [ i .......... ^ ■ • 

that the Hoard of Till. lie \\ 

th thebuildii. 



Regular Meeting Veteran Firemen. 

The regular monthly meeting of the Ve- 
teran Firemen's Association was held Tuea- 
day, July 2. The meeting was called tb( 
(1 " to ai s o'clock p. m.. President John S. Farley 



the fact that on the Fourth there was lot occupying the chair. All of fl 

alarm, that of the burning of an auto one, tors and a large number of mem be 

answered roll call. 



garage, with a loss of $450, and this was con- 
trasted with former Independence Days when 



was 



read. 



The Directors' 
concurred in and ordered filed. 



the free use of fireworks was the custom and Comrades Chas. Bell, ('on Mooney Tl 

Mahoney, J. W. McAdoo and S. G. Drum- 



Confucius, the Chinese philosopher, speak- 
ing of man's weakness, says: "It is because 
. he partial ' "" srd it. ise they 
love, unjust toward the-.- thej lia'e. servih? 
toward those above them, arrogant to those 
then] and either harsh or overindulgent 
to those in poverty and distress that it is so 
difficult to find any one capable of exercising 
a sound judgment with respect to the quali- 
ties of ol hers. " 



Owing to the inability of the Fire Commis- 
sion of late to get tdgtther, the report of the 
Administrative Committee in this, as well as 
last week's issue,»is a little stale. In fact it 
may be mentioned, that of late all the pro- 
ceedings of the Administrative Committee is 
common gossip in the .department before be- 



when the fire department wa< held in high 
tension th'roughotrt the entire day and night. 
The mavor made mention of the fact that the 
efficiency of the hit department is shown by 
the fact that during tin- past fiscal year, just 
closed, the tire loss litis been reduced 70 cents 
per capita from that, of the previous year. 
Fire Chief Eley for the past three month- i ,- 
had acorns of men making can I HI inspections 

'of the business and industrial districts to note 

conditions that inviied fires and to insist upon 
their being remedied. Be stated that the 
business men had cheerfully complied with 
these 'demands .and thai undodbtedlv this has 
much to do with the city's line record forlack 
of serious fires. 

t'. E.Mclveag. secretary of the I- ire Com- 
mission, went-, on a two weeks' vacation to 
northern, cities to study the method in which 
records of offices similar to his own are 
managed. 

The Fire Commission recommend to the 
Public Service Commission the [lacing of 



mood still on the sick list and about the same 
as when last - one "Pi lo- 

cation for and one elected to membership. 
A communication was received from tne City 
Council of Alameda, thanking the : 
for attending the funeral of our late Com- 
rade Fred K. Krauih, Jr.. chief of the 

Alameda Fire Bfepartj i. The letter was 

filed and the secretary instructed to ac- 
knowledge the same by suitable reply. 
Bills to the amount of $>2.c.i was ordered 
paid; the receipts were $-!'- The Com- 
mittee on Revision of Laws, the Com- 
mittee on Uniform and the ('on ni'itl i 
Picnic made progressive reports. The routine 
business was rapidly disposed of. After ad- 
journment a very pleasant hour was enjoyed 
in playing whist, crihhage, domino's, etc. 

Members of the department who are Span- 
ish War Veterans are r.qoesteel to* remember 
the joint picnic of the Camps around the bay, 
to be held Sunday. July 21, at Schueizeu Park. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Around the Bay. 

[Special Correspondence.] 

The Pope-Hartford company secured the 
contract to supply Oakland with a new com- 
bination ambulance and police patrol wagon. 
Their bid was $4,900 and the machine is to be 
delivered in sixty days. 

A company has at last been installed in the 
engine house on Thirteenth avenue and Hop- 
kins street. This company was badly needed 
as the territory surrounding the engine house 
has built up rapidly. 

The Council has advertised for bids for the 
construction of a two-story frame engine 
house to be erected in Allendale. Bids will 
be received on July 29. 

The Oakland department has been kept on 
the move during the last few days. On July 
5 the business block at Sixteenth and San 
Pablo was destroyed by fire. The upper part 
of the building was occupied as a lodging 
house, and several of the occupants had nar- 
row escapes from being burned to death. 
The loss is estimated at $75,000, with only a 
small portion of it covered by insurance. 

On July 6 the residence of E. Lea in Fruit- 
vale was burnt to the ground before the de- 
partment arrived. Lea's small daughter, who 
was in the house at the time of the fire, was 
burned to death. The loss is estimated at 
$1500, partially covered by insurance. 

A dyeing establishment at Twenty-eighth 
and San Pablo was also totally destroyed. 
The loss is estimated at $4,000, partly cov- 
ered by insurance. Numerous other small 
fires helped to keep the department busy. 

Edward Haley has been appointed chief of 
the San Jose Fire Department. Dr. E. F. 
Holbrook and John Mecklam were appointed 
Police and Fire Commissioners. 

The Vallejo Fire Department took part in 
the parade held in Vallejo on the Fourth. 

The Pleasanton Fire Department has been 
granted $500 for the purpose of installing an 
electric fire alarm system. 

Chief R. F. Baasch was again elected to 
fill the position of chief of the Richmond de- 
partment. 

The members of Company 1 of the Rich- 
mond Fire Department are preparing to give 
a whist party at their quarter." August 1. 

Hock -Wright. 

Firedepartment circles are all agog over the 
announcement of the engagement of Harry 
Hock, a well known and popular member of 
the San Francisco Fire Department to Miss 
Ethel Wright of this city. Miss Wright is 
the daughter of Mrs. A. Wright and niece of 
Mrs. N. Bisonette. She is a graduate of St. 
Hrigid's Academy, is possessed of unusual 
musical ahility, and is extremely popular in 
a large circle of friends. Fireman Hock is 
the son of Henry T. Hock, a local musician, 
and the grandson of H. T. Hock of the Na- 
tional Brewery. He is president of the Entre 
Nous Cotillon. A tea was given recently in 
honor of the engagement at the home of the 
bride's mother. The date of the wedding, 
which is to be a church affair, has not yet 
been announced. 



Hustle and Grin. 



Published at the requst of "Happy Dan." 

Smile, and the world smiles with you, 
Knock, and you go it alone; 

For the cheerful grin 

Will let you in 
Where the kicker is never known. 

Growl, and the way looks dreary; 
Laugh, and the path is bright; 

For a welcome smile 

Brings sunshine, while 
A frown shuts out the light. 

Hustle! and fortune awaits you. 
Shirk! and defeat is sure; 

For there's no chance 

For deliverance 
For the chap who can't endure. 

Sing, and the world's harmonious, 
Grumble, and things go wrong, 
And all the time 
You are out of rhyme 
With the busy, hustling throng. 

Kick, and there's trouble brewing, 
Whistle, and life is gay. 

And the world's in tune - 

Like a day in June 
And the clouds all melt away. 

Where's Captain Hartman? 

He's really gone plum foolish, 
He doesn't know where he's at 
Since he read in the papers 
About the firefighters 
Putting it all over the cops. 

Cadigan of engine 43 carries a Waterbury 
watch. The boys say he has to keep up a 
steady jiggle on himself to keep it from 
stopping. 

The boys of truc'k 1 say that since "Ferris" 
Hartman removed his grub box thev have 
succeeded in catching all the rats in the 
basement. 



One of the boys of engine 44 has a new 
song, which he intends to have set to music, 
entitled, "Wear a Rose of Red if You Love 
Me True." 



"Bull" Collins of engine 24 says he's in a 
class by himself, now that Parks is unable 
to keep up to his strenuous stunts in the 
sprinting line. 



Our old friend Engineer Welch of engine 41, 
who recently spent two months at Byron Hut 
Springs, shows marked improvement. He 
was certainly a very sick man before his de- 
parture for the springs. 

Ed. Church of the corporation yard, when 
asked as to his health over the phone said, 
"Oh, I'm able to sit up and take medicine, 
and with the assistance of three squares a day, 
the doctor thinks I'll worry along." 

M. Dwyer of engine 44 has received several 
queries in regard to the Spanish War Veter- 
ans and requests us to state for the benefit of 
all interested firemen that Wm. I). MiKinnon 
Camp is named after Father McKinnon, for- 



mer chaplain of the First California Volun- 
teers. The meetings are held every Tuesday 
night at Jefferson Square Hall, 925 Golden 
Gate avenue. Applications can be obtained 
by notifying Ed. Lamb, truck 1, J. Ryan, 
truck 10, M. Dwyer, engine 44, or H. G. 
Preston, Pacific Fireman. 



"Will you insist on having love, honor and 
obey in the marriage service?" said one of 
the boys to Engineer Kinney of fireboat 2. 
"No," he replied; "the only thing I'll ask is 
that she won't smoke in the house." 



Captain Bowlan's father, aged 69, who died 
last Thursday after a lingering illness of 
many years, was buried Saturday at Cypress 
Lawn. Captain Bowlan informed us that 
previous to his death he only weighed forty 
pounds. 

It was rumored that Frank Cunningham of 
truck 1 was married last week, but Frank 
says nay. He told the boys, "I may have 
all the symptoms of a married man, but 
you've got another guess coming, ' ' and Frank 
out to know. 

Captain Rocco of fireboat 2 always has a 
smile for his friends. He is one of the best- 
natured men in the department. We have 
known him about five years and in all that 
time we have never seen him with a grouch. 
He has the happy faculty of adapting himself 
to conditions, which very few firemen seem to 
understand. 



Teddy Sutter of fireboat 2 put in his vaca- 
tion at Glen Park and engine 38. He says his 
cup of joy will be complete when he obtains 
a transfer to Captain O'Niel's company, the 
handsomest bunch in the department, he 
thinks. "For goodness sake, somebody get 
him a transfer," says McCarthy. "We don't 
want him." 

Logan of engine 19 went to call on a Hayes 
Vallev girl one Sunday evening recently, and 
after waiting some time remarked to her 
little brother, "Your sister is a long time 
making her appearance." "Gee," said the 
kid, "She'd be a sight if she came down with- 
out making it," and Logan proceeded to 
make another cigarette. 

In a visit to Lieut. Kehoe at St. Joseph's 
Hospital, Thursday, we found him propped 
up with pillows, looking bright and cheerful, 
considering the pain and agony he has en- 
dured the past two or three weeks. Out- 
side of a feeling of soreness he is resting very 
comfortable, and it is thought in the course 
of a couple of weeks he will be well enough 
to leave the hospital. In speaking of the 
accident, to use his own words: "When the 
boys picked me up I thought my days of fire* 
lighting were over, but it seems I am still in 
the fight, t hough a lit tie bruised up. " Through 
ill.' PACIFIC Fireman he wishes to thank his 
manv friends for their many visits and acte 
of kindness during his illness. 



Telephone DiHiaUi 12^5 

L. J. BORCK, ' ■"»-' tailor 

MAKES A SPECIALTY OF 

FIREMEN'S '.• UNIFORMS 
ALSO FINE CIVILIAN SUITS 

93 EDDY STREET San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 

JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 

Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening, Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Reach Nurseries, take Castro street car to 23rd, or 

Mission, 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



The Fireman's Retort. I JJ Qwar( J WatClieS 



pi™„ ( D °<" ] " 4934 

Kht ""*( Home C 2842 



i HomeS 3174 



Serveau Bros. 

FLORISTS 

128 POST ST. 2110-2114 FILLMORE ST. 



Lamanet Bros. 



Telephone 
Home C 2458 

Is the place of all places to gel the very latest and besl in the way of 

Firemen's Regulation Skirts, 
Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents* Furnishing Goods 

Hats and Underwear, Etc. 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



NA/M. F. EGAN 

M. B. C. V. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D 

1155 GOLDEN GATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 



Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth. Avenue, Oakland 



THE TRIPP REMEDY CO. 

GUARANTEES TO CURE 

BLOOD POISON 

In every stage 

ACQUIRED OR HEREDITARY 

RHEIU MATISM 

ACUTE OR CHRONIC 

PARALYSIS ERYSIPELAS 

CATARRH SCROFULA 

MALARIA LUPUS 

DISEASES OF 
LIVER, KIDNEY AND BLADDER 
DISEASES PECULIAR TO WOMEN 

Call or Write to 

W. G. NOBLE 

Agent and Distributor 

832 Market St. San Francisco 



[By C. R. Maloy.] 

We're only a bunch of loafers 

Sittin' around all day, 
Oglin' the passin' women, 

Drawin' our easy pay. 
Ward-heelin' for the bosses, 

Helpin' them get the graft, 
We're a lovely crowd of boozers; 

They're rakin us fore and aft. 

Good Lord! there's the signal ringin'. 

Steady, boys! let 'er go— 
We're off— my God, it's a big one— 

The Chief's here already, so! 
"Follow me, boys!" he's shoutin', 

You'd think he was leadin' a dance. 
Our Chief don't give no instructions, 

He goes first and takes his chance. 

Of course us lazy loafers 

Would follow him right thro' hell; 
That's what we're paid for doin', 

We know that all too well. 
Good God! the wall's a-craekin'. 

Save yourselves, if you can. 
There's a crash, she's tumblin'! 

They're crushed, every one to a man. 

Now take up your subscriptions, 

Show us the depth of your grief; 
Let the papers blaze with petitions 

For money for our relief. 
Turn out in sad processions 

To follow our charred remains. 
We're heroes indeed for the moment— 

The fire has burnt out our stains. 

We're only a bunch of loafers, 

Sittin' around all day, 
Oglin' the passin' women, 

Drawin' our easy pay. 
But when the fire's a-ragin", 

When hell in the city is loose, 
We become for the day the brave fire- 
men, 

They quit givin' us the deuce. 

Cover the chief's coffin with flowers. 

And dry up his orphans' tears; 
Hang all sorts of contraptions 

On the other poor devils' biers. 
We're thankful, friends, for your pity, 

While your hero-worship lasts, 
But we'd prefer a little square dealin' 

'Midst the reformer's trumpet blasts. 



SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 

Six hundred thousand Americans go abroad 

eV o2ce y Se" American tourist preferred a foreign 
watch. Now he goes to Europe with a Howard 
bought here— or comes back with a Howard 

""H^ha^n example in the ship's officer on 
,1,, dock, w -ders up the gang plank on 

H You r tad m more and more of the responsible 
men carrying Howard Watches. 

The great railroads started it. The time in- 
.,„, i,„s of 1KM American railroads have omciaHj 
certified and adopted the Howard. 

t Is carried by leading technical men— by the 
heads Of great industrial and ™n™erclal «£ 
terprises-by scientists— by army and navy 
officers and government official^ h 

Many a man buys a Howard for the sheer 
oleasure of. owning the watch that is so wen 
?poken of by men whose opinion he respect^ 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 

11 The'price of each watch is fixed at the fac- 
tory a". 1 a printed ticket attached-from the 
7 „\v.i i double roller) in a Crescent Extra or 
Ross Extra gold-filled case at $40. to the Ji- 
lt *150-and the Edward Howard model 

^Admiral Sigsbee has written a little book 
"The Log of the Howard Watch. "g,v>ng the 
record of his own Howard in the U. |»^- 
You'll enjoy it. Drop us a post-card, Dept. JN. 
and we'll send you a copy. 
HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston, Mass 

T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AIND JEWELRY 
7" WALLER ST.. _SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Kearny 3523 



HomeC 1780 



JOE. H. ROSENBERG 

ffitiiil anb fHUilaru Sailor 

73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 
Loui. Fr.nkenber,. lom.erWthRo«nUum^<Ab™K»m. Manager 

Home phone S 2317 

The Little Emporium 

L. R1ZNIC Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

VNDEBWEAR A SPECIALTY 
2296-98 GEARY STREET 

T j^^W ^^_g ANFRANgCg 

" , , r. . ,o 7 , Home C 4992 

Telephone Douglas 2871 

WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

^RJ^JT^BROKEJiS 

630 KEARNY STREET 
C3 1 £CAWiriRClAI^ _ i ANF^ANCISCO 

Phone Home J 2549 

EMILSCHOENBBIN 

Fireman Cap Maker 

Formerly o( 21st and Folsom 
..WILLIAMS.-. BUILDING 

THIRD STREET 

Cor. Mission, Room 307 SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Douslss 3825 



Phone Home C 2996 



MALERBI RESTAURANT 

MALERBI & FRUGOL1. Props. 
...First Class Wines, Liquors and Cigars.... 

Regular Week Day Meals. Noon 35 cents. Evening 25 cent. 
Sunday Meals 50 cents up 

546 Front St. near Jackson San Francisco 



L. L.gomarsino Phones^™^ 474 J. Chit.rdcjli 

The New Popular 

Restaurant and Coffee Parlor 
Bakery and Confectionery 

French & Italian Cooking 
115-117 THIRD ST. SAN FRANCISCO 




VOL. IX. -NO. 29 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, JULY 20, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Motor vs. Horse -Drawn 
Apparatus. 

A practical demonstration of the 
superior efficiency of motor fire appa- 
ratus over horse-drawn was given 
last week under the supervision of the 
Board of Fire Commissioners and other 
city officials. An evening paper in 
discussing the event had this to say: 

With $100,000 appropriated by the 
Board of Supervisors to buy motor- 
driven equipment for the fire depart- 
ment, should tests prove the supe- 
riority of the automobile fire appara- 
tus, the Board of Fire Commis-ioners 
set Wednesday, July 10, for the test. 
A combination hose cart and fire auto 
engine was brought to the firehouse 
at Second avenue and Clement street. 
It was set up beside the old engine. 
The proponets of the old and the new 
stood at attention. 

An alarm of fire rang in. The horses 
jumped from their stalls. They were 
harnessed in a jiffy. The crew of the 
motor engine cranked in a twinkling. 
The crew of each was in position al- 
most at the same instant. The motor 
crew had made the best of the start. 
Neck and neck they left the house. 

John Cahill cooed and crooned to 
the animals. He whispered in tones 
that no man could hear. The sparkle 
cam" in their eyes and flared into 
flame of fearful striving. Their nos- 
trils extended and their ears lay flat 
on their heads. Action for action 
those three faithful beasts moved like 
a single piece of machinery. It was 
thrilling. 

But the man-made machine could 
not he shaken off. For a block it was 



about an even race, but the wear and 
tear of the struggle was suffered only 
by the animals. The sputtering ex- 
haust of the machine was loudest and 
more irregular at the start but it 
quieted down to even action as the 
breath of the horses grew irregular, 
deeper and louder. The faster and 
the farther the contestants went the 
easier the machine ran and the stiffer 
became the strain on the animals. 

At the end of the first block deter- 
ioration set in on the horses. The ac- 
tion of the machine became better. It 
pulled ahead, slowly, but surely and 
continuously. With every revolution 
of the wheels the gap between horse 
and motor widened. 

In two minutes and twenty seconds 
the motor had reached a hydrant at 
Thirteenth avenue and Lake street. 
Eighty seconds later a great stream of 
water was shooting high in the air 
from the nozzle of the hose carried by 
the motor, its gasoline pump wheezing 
away in most businesslike tones. 

The horse-drawn engine had a 
stream going in five minutes and six 
seconds. It was a crushing defeat for 
the horses. 

It may be that those three foam- 
flecked animals did not know what it 
all meant as they stood trembling and 
twitching there, but the human who 
thought so at the time was without 
Invc for animals and dead to imagina- 
tion. 

And then the sentence of exile was 
passed upon those horses and all other 
horses that mighl aspire to tin' sweets 
that are carried to the firehouse every 
day by legions. 

A great crowd of persons saw the 



contest, and the result brought gloom 
to more than one heart in the gather- 
ing, and the women and children were 
not alone in their grief over the failure 
of the pets. 

Herbert Penny, inventor of the mo- 
tor apparatus, was at the wheel in the 
race, with J. L. Phillips of Seattle 
and Jack Fitzgerald of San Francisco 
beside him. On the motor as a crew 
were firemen Lawrence Masterson, 
Arthur Goddard, Leo March and Thos. 
Muldoon of San Francisco, and James 
Dixon, F. Stokes, Sam Gluck and 
Russell Parsons of the Oakland de- 
partment. 

Besides John Cahill there were on 
the old apparatus Captain James 
Conniff, in charge, and Firemen Wal- 
ter Lintott, who drove a two-horse 
hose cart that really didn't count in 
the race. 

Chief Murphy was satisfied with the 
showing and agreed with President 
Brandenstein, the Supervisors and 
others that the day of the horse has 
passed. 

"We may be forced to put in more 
horses to use the old style apparatus 
until it is used up," said Brandenstein, 
"but we will never buy another piece 
of horse-drawn apparatus. It is said 
that the old apparatus may be con- 
verted without much expense, but that 
matter needs further invest e.at ion. " 

Robert Vance appeared with another 
motor-driven apparatus and a crew to 
take part in the race, but it was de- 
cided that th< re would be too much 
danger to the crowds that lined the 

coarse if the Vance machine was ad- 
mitted. 
The lire horse is doomed. There 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



will never be another piece of horse- 
drawn apparatus purchased for the 
fire department of San Francisco. 
The gallant horse has had his day. 
The motor displaces him. Everyone 
will be sorry to hear this for senti- 
mental reasons. Everyone should be 
delighted to hear it for material rea- 
sons. We lose the thrill of the faith- 
ful animal dashing through the street 
but we gain the time that means the 
saving of millions of dollars in prop- 
erty and no one knows how many 
lives." 

That sums up the remarks and opin- 
ions of city officials from Edward 
Rainey, socretary to the mayor, down 
to Engine Driver John Cahill, who 
drove the three-horse team that made 
the battle of their lives for the con- 
tinuation of their species in the de- 
partment — and lost. 

Motor Apparatus for the San Francisco 
Fire Department. 

Under the above caption the Pacific 
Motor for July says: 

Discussion of the needs of San Fran- 
cisco for fighting fires in a more ade- 
quate manner than is at present in 
vogue, particularly in the matter of 
motor-driven apparatus, received the 
consideration of the finance commit- 
tee of the Board of Supervisors during 
its meeting, when the budget came up 
for approval. 

It was stated by President Branden- 
stein of the Fire Commission, that a 
proper equipment of the department 
with motor apparatus would cost 
$1,000,000. and that a bond issue 
would be necessary in order to raise 
this sum. He claimed that the sub- 
stitution of motor apparatus would 
have to be gradual. Motor-driven 
apparatus, according to Brandenstein, 
was needed in San Francisco more 
than any other city, on account of the 
difficulty in having high hills, strong 
winds and the character of many of 
the buildings. Without motor appa- 
ratus a great difficulty existed in get- 
ting to fires rapidly. 

Supervisor McCarthy favored motor 
apparatus, but doubted whether the 
apparatus had yet reached a degree of 
perfection to warrant an immense 
outlay. A moderate sum, however, 
could be used judiciously in motor 
equipment for the fire department. 



The Passing of the Fire Horse 

The Evening Post of July 13 of this 
city, in discussing the recent motor 
fire apparatus test over horse-drawn 
vehicles, editorially commented on the 
passing of the fire horse as follows: 

It looks very much like the passing 
of the most thrilling picture of city 
life, the dash of the horse-drawn fire 
apparatus over the pavements. In a 
fair test a motor-driven fire engine 
badly outdistanced a piece of fire ap- 
paratus drawn by the best horses in 
the San Francisco department and 
there are some wonderful animals 
kept for fire-fighting in this city. If 
this test is backed by similar tests the 
fire horse must go, despite the fact 
that his passing will be almost a tra- 
gedy to the normal human being who 
loves the horse and whose pulses 
quicken when the bells clang and the 
iron-shod hoofs beat on the pavement. 

But fire-fighting is a matter in 
which sentiment should play no part. 
San Francisco wants the most up-to- 
date and efficient fire department that 
can be had. This city has had a bit- 
ter lesson in the matter of fires and 
utility in this case takes immediate 
piecedence over the love for the pic- 
turesque. The horse must prove his 
right to exist in the fire department in 
direct competition with the motor or 
he must go. 

In a recent fire in the Richmond 
district a mother and child were burn- 
ed to death when they might have 
been saved by the arrival of the fire 
engines a few minutes earlier. It was 
not the fault of the department. It 
was not because the horses were not 
the best that could be obtained. The 
men and the animals did all that men 
and animals could do, but they were 
too late by a few minutes. The test 
which was held the other day shows 
thar, the motor-driven engine takes 
about half the time to reach afire that 
is now taken by the horse-drawn ap- 
paratus. This would tend to support 
the claim that these two lives might 
have been saved had the department 
been supplied with motor-driven fire 
engines at the time of the accirlent. 

Sentiment would demand the reten- 
tion of the fire horse if it were not 
demonstrated that he is obsolete. 
There is more than a little sadness 
over the necessity for his passing, but 
this is one instance where utility will 
not be robbed of the victim which it 
has selected. 



Carter Cars for Fire Chiefs. 

An order for several model "R" 
Roadsters was received last week from 
the department of Milwaukee, by the 
Chicago branch of the Carter Car 
Company. These cars will be used by 
the department chiefs in responding 
to alarms, and will add much efficiency 
to the department. 

In this connection it will be remem- 
bered that the fire department of 
Detroit, Michigan, has some Carter 
cars which have been in use for seven 
years and they have just recently 
added five more to their equipment. 
The extreme reliability of the Carter 
car, coupled with its ability to give 
good service in both winter and sum- 
mer make it ideal for use for fire de- 
partments.— Pacific Motor. 

A Credible Record. 

During the past year the Porter- 
ville (Cal.) Fire Department has been 
composed of two automobile hose and 
chemical engines and a record of the 
alarms responded to and the damage 
done during that period shows that 
the department put out twenty-two 
fires, with a total property of less than 
$200. This record is considered a re- 
markable one since the city never 
passed a year before without at least 
three dangerous and costly fires. But 
$1530 has been spent on the depart- 
ment for salaries and repairs since it 
was changed from an old fashioned to 
an up-to-date one.— Ex. 

Blind Workers First. 



It was the recruit's first fire. A 
piano factory was burning. Said the 
battalion chief to the recruit: 

"Find out where the tuning room is 
and make for that." 

The recruit obeyed. Afterward he 
asked why. 

"Because during woiking houisycu 
are likely to find several blind men 
there," said the chief. "Many piaro 
tuners are blind, and in case of rite 
they need first help in petting out. 
When lighting fire in a I i-'no factory 
always bear that in mind." 



Phone Douslas 3825 



Phone Home C 2996 



MALERBI RESTAURANT 

MALERBI & FRUGOLI. Prop.. 
....First Class Wines, Liquors and Cigars... 

Regular Week Day Meals, Noon 35 cents- Evening 25 cent* 
Sunday Meals 50 cents up 

546 Front St. near Jackson San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

In compliance with popular request 
the Alcazar management has decided 
to retain Bessie Barriscale and "The 
Rose of the Rancho" a second week, 
commencing next Monday night, 
which will afford the positively last 
opportunities to see the charming lit- 
tle actress in the famous Belasco-Tully 
play. It was planned to have her ap- 
pear in another of her successful ve- 
hicles, hut the inability of thousands 
of her admirers to again witness her 
entrancing portrayal of Juanita and 
their request that it be continued one 
more week necessitated the change of 
schedule. She has scored the great- 
est artistic and pecuniary success in 
the history of the O'Farrell-street 
home of drama, and her entrance to 
stardom in New York will be accom- 
panied by very pleasant memory of 
the farewell tributes bestowed upon 
her by San Francisco. It is the 
unanimous opinion that "The Rose of 
the Rancho" has never been given a 
more perfect production at the Alca- 
zar than it is now receiving. While 
the lion's share of the acting honors 
are awarded Miss Barriscale. of course, 
her support comes in for no small 
share of the plaudits so lavishly be- 
stowed after each curtain-fall. 



Empress Theatre. 

One of the swiftest and most thrill- 
ing acrobatic acts to tour the Sullivan 
& Considine circuit will be seen as the 
headline attraction at the Empress 
commencing Sunday afternoon, when 
Braliam Ben Bujamaa and his troupe 
of eleven Arabs appear. A sensational 
magician, Herbert Brooks, will pre- 
sent his $20,000 Trunk Mystery as the 
feature attraction. Allan Dinehart 
and Anna Heritage, both former legi- 
timate players, will present "The Two 
Rubies," giving them opportunity for 
their various talents. Irene and Bob- 
bie Smith, two fascinating young 
women, will present some dainty 
gowns during their singing and danc- 
ing numbers. .John T. Murray, a 
smart comedian from across the pond, 
will be lizard in songs, dances and 
some small talk. The Krags Trio of 
European Equilibrists will present a 
series of difficult and amazing tricks 
on a bar high above the stage. Tom 
Haverlv and Corinne Wells, present- 
ing "Mr. Piker and Miss Kidder," a 
bil composed of slangy patter, songs 
atnl a little dancing will occupy a 
prominent spot on the bill. 



SEAGRAVE AERIAL 
MOTOR -DRIVEN HOOK AND LADDER TRUCK 




In service at Vancouver, B. C, Boise, Idaho, San Diego and Los 

Angeles, California. 

Territory covered by the 
Gorham Fire Apparatus Company, Inc. 

Seagrave Representatives for the Pacific Slope 



SEATTLE 
82 & 84 W. Marion Street 


SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Street 


LOS ANGELES 
1223 S. Olive Street 


American 


Rubber 


Mfg. Co. 



9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories — Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 



WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 



Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose, Brass 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Department Supplies 

When You're Buyin' Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

l_. H. &c B. I. BILL 

Sole Distributors for the Pcclflc Coast 543 Uolden Gate Ave., San Prnnilsco 





PACIFIC FIREMAN 



P 



>ACIFI 




1REHAN 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manacer 



Editorial Rooms and Business Office, 479 Turk Street. 
San Francisco. Telephone Fra nklin 6867. 

Entered as second-class matter March 21. 1908. at the 
Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 



SATURDAY JULY 20. 1912 



The Pope -Hartford motor combination 
chemical will be assigned to the quarters of 
truck 7 as soon as certain alterations are 
completed. 

Since the appointment of Mr. Bermingham 
as Superintendent of Engines he has made a 
saving of more than $500 in the matter of fuel 
for the fireboats. 



The American Rubber Company, whose fac- 
tory is located at Emeryville, Cal., during 
the past two or three months have furnished 
in the neighborhood of 25,000 feet of fire hose 
to the Navy Department of the government, 
all of which successfully passed the rigid spe- 
cifications required. 

President Brandenstein stated that an erro- 
neous report had been published to the effect 
that Capt. Gallatin, Jr. and Lieut. Phillips 
had been reprimanded by the Administrative 
Committee. The facts were these officers 
were called before the committee to explain 
and they did so satisfactorily. The error oc- 
curred, it is thought, in writing the report. 

W. J. Gorham and C. A. Taber were in 
Oakland last Saturday and Sunday with the 
new pumping engine, made by the Gorham 
Engineering and Fire Apparatus Company. 
It was remarked that the engine would wash 
the houses off their foundations, and it cer- 
tainly looked as if it would be easy to do it. 
The engine is to be tested in Oakland Sun- 
day, July 21. 

Help Firemen and Department, Too. 

Under the above head the Daily News of 
July 16 contained the following: 

At a meeting of a committee of members 
of the Fire Department it has been decided 
to ask the permission of the Fire Commis- 
sioners to put to the vote of the people a 
charter amendment designed to rectify condi- 
tions which force members of the department 
to be on duty 24 hours of the day. 

The report that the firemen were to ask an 
eight-hour day and that tripling the force 
would be necessary, was an error. 

What the firemen do want is this: That 
shifts of 12 hours or of 10 and 14 hours be es- 
tablished by the charter. Each engine com- 
pany now includes 11 men. In order to effect 
the new arrangement it would be necessary, 
say members of the committee, to add bul 
three men to each company. 

The firemen point out that not only would 



this be beneficial to the men, but it would also 
be a fine thing for department efficiency. 
With two shifts, seven men would be on duty 
at all times. At present when men are off at 
meals and otherwise, there is sometimes but 
four men on duty at an engine house. Under 
the new arrangement there would be no time 
off for meals and the firemen would be on 
duty clear through the shift. 

As soon as the committee secures necessary 
permission an initiative petition will be 
started and the measure placed before the 
people at the primary or regular election so 
that there will be no additional cost involved 
in a special election. 

If the above is a true statement of facts 
the Pacific Fireman heartily endorses the 
foregoing, and hope the Fire Commissioners 
will be able to see their way clear by grant- 
ing the above request of the men. If the 
matter is put up to the people at the primary 
or regular election there is no doubt as to the 
result, as they have always stood loyally by the 
firemen heretofore in granting their reasona- 
ble requests. This matter is now being dis- 
cussed in many of the large cities throughout 
the country, and the writer looks for favora- 
ble action by the Commissioners in letting 
the people decide. 



them accompanying the machine in their cars 
along the route. 

After the test Chief Murphy said the truck 
could run where horses could not go, and it 
was therefore of inestimable value aside from 
its greater speed. He also stated he was 
thoroughly satisfied with the tryout. 

Superintendent of Engines Bermingham, 
when seen Tuesday, who rode on the truck 
during its run to the ocean beach, stated that 
the machine more than fulfilled its specifica- 
tions in every particular and would be ac- 
cepted by the department after the ladders 
were tested, which took place Wednesday. 

San Francisco Fire Commissioners 



Official Test of a Seagrave Motor Truck. 

The big six cylinder eighty horse-power 
motor Seagrave truck, purchased by the San 
Francisco Fire Department at a cost of 
$9,475, weighing 13,500 riounds, arrived here 
Thursday, July 11. Previous to its official 
test by this department it was taken across 
the bay and put through its paces as to hill 
climbing and speed records. From informa- 
tion at hand the machine more than verified 
what the Gorham Fire Apparatus Company 
claimed for it. Steep hills were negotiated at 
a speed of from 10 to 12 miles an hour with 
easeJL In Alameda the machine attained a 
speed oi 42 miles an hour, and, at the close of 
the run, increased it to 60 miles. 

At its official test Monday, July 15, the 
route mapped out by Chief Murphy, starting 
from Kearny and Bush streets at 5:30 p. m., 
the machine was driven up the hill to Taylor, 
thence to Pine, along Pine to Hyde, along 
Hvde toCalifornia and back to Mason street. 
The second test began at Market and Haight 
streets, when the truck was run to Baker 
street and back again, accomplishing with 
ease the required 10-mile an hour test by the 
department, after which a speed of 20 miles 
an hour completed the official test. 

The machine was required to accomplish 20 
miles an hour on the level, but was driven 
along the ocean beach at 60 miles an hour. 

New York city and Patterson, N. J., have 
the only duplicates of this machine. It has 
six wheels and carries the same equipment as 
the horse-drawn hook and ladder truck, with 
ten men as the erew. 

The tryout was witnessed by Fire Commis- 
sioners Brandenstein, Dillon and Pfaeffle. 
Automobile experts and owners of cars of 
every make and design blocked traffic for 
more than an hour before the test, many of 



The Board of Fire Commissioners met in 
regular session Thursday, July 18 (Commis- 
sioner Donohoe absent) and transacted the 
following business: 

Report of the Administrative Committee on 
communications with recommendations: 

From the Civil Service Commission, sub- 
mitting copy of a complaint received from 
I the attorney of the Civil Service Employes' 
Association relative to the dismissal of S. H. 
Richards and requesting advice as to the 
standing of George Knorp, Alfred Girot, Wm. 
Brown and John Moholy, machinists at the 
I corporation yard. Committee to investigate 
and report to Board its findings. 

From the Board of Pension Fund Commis- 
sioners, advising that the following members 
of the department have been retired on pen- 
sion, to take effect July 1, 1912: M. J. Far- 
ley, battalion chief, for physical disability; 
Joseph Sawyer, watchman, for full time of 
service; Benjamin F. Currier, hoseman en- 
■ gine 23, for physical disability; Nicholas Bar- 
I betta, driver monitor battery 2, for full time 
| of service. Recommend be placed on file. 

From Howard Holmes, lieutenant engine 4, 
requesting that he be allowed salary as cap- 
tain of said company during all the time he 
I has been acting as such since tht death of 
Captain Miskel. Recommend be granted. 

From Thos. Morton & Son, in reply to com- 
munication calling attention to inferior quali- 
i ty of coal delivered under its contract and 
j stating that the same had been replaced. 
I Recommend be filed. 

From Horris K. Davis Machine Works, 
calling attention to the prompt and efficient 
service rendered by engine 6 at a fire at that 
establishment on the 5th instant. Recom- 
mend be filed. 

From Dennis A. O'Connell, hoseman engine 
33, tendering his resignation as a member of 
the department, to take effect from the 4th 
instant. Recommend be accepted. 

From John B. Kenny, hoseman engine 9, 
requesting that he be granted a leave of ab- 
sence for fifteen days, withcut pay, com- 
mencing August 15. Recommend be granted. 
Communication from Edward Sheets, fire- 
man fireboat 2, requesting that he be granted 
a leave of absence for fifteen days, without 
pay, commencing July 8. Recommend be 
granted. 

From James Walsh, hoseman engine 12, 
requesting that he be granted a leave of ab- 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



sence for one month, with pay, with permis- 
sion to leave the city on account of sickness, 
commencing on the 8th instant. Recommend 
be granted. 

From chief engineer, submitting complaint 
against L. Strand, fireman fireboat 1, for ab- 
senting bimself from duty without permission 
on July 1. Recommend his services be dis- 
pensed with. 

From chief engineer, submitting report 
from Battalion Chief Conlon relative to Frank 
Lnttritz, truckman truck 12, absenting him- 
self from duty on June 29. Recommend after 
an investigation of complaint that Lottritz be 
deprived of pay during suspension. 

From department physician and surgeon, 
submitting report relative to the physical con- 
dition of John Fahey, captain engine 22, J. F. 
Thompson, truckman truck 8 and Geo. Bury, 
lieutenant chemical 5. Recommend said 
members appear before the Board at next 
regular meeting. 

From Chas. Gavigan, blacksmith helper at 
the corporation yard, making application for 
salary on account of disability resulting from 
an injury received in the discharge of duty in 
March, 1911. Recommend same be granted, 
Gavigan waiving all future claims for salary 
on account of this particular injury. 

From the Board of Directors of the Widows 
and Orphans' Aid Association and the Mutual 
Aid Association of the San Francisco Fire 
Department, requesting the sanction of the 
Board to conduct a concert and ball for the 
benefit of said association in November next, 
and also that the members be allowed the 
privilege of disposing of tickets for the same. 
Recommend be granted. 

From the city attorney, advising that he 
has received an offer of sale for lots Nos. 2 
and 3, block H, Glen Park Terrace, for this 
department from the agent of the Crocker 
Estate Co. for $1175. Recommend be taken 
under advisement. 

From' the Consolidated Motor Car Company, 
relative to the Fisk Tire Company guaran- 
teeing its rubber tires. Recommend that 
these tires be tried on the apparatus. 

From Dr. Egan, Department Veterinarian, 
submitting report of sick and injured horses 
t rea led (luring the past month. Recommend 
be filed. 

From chief engineer, recommending that 
tli" Civil Service Commission be requested to 
certify seafaring men from its eligible list of 
firemen to fill vacancies that may occur in 
fireboat companies in the future. Recom- 
mend be approved. 

From chief engineer, reporting having made 
the following assignments for duty of proba- 
tionary members and substitutes appointed 
at the fajti meeting, i" take effecl on the 16th 
instant: W. J. UcKenna, to probationary 
hoseman engine 1; Bert Schaefer, to proba- 
tionary hoseman engine 4; I.. .1. Murphy, to 
probationary hoseman engine 85; Jas. Lowe, 
t<i temporary engineer fireboat 2; F. W. 
Leahy, I" temporary engineer fireboat '■'; W. 
D. Sullivan, i<> temporary engineer fireboat 
3; W. J. Tallant, to temporary fireman fire- 
boat 2; Walter rlogan, in temporary fireman 



fireboat 3; W. V. Olsen, to temporary pilot 
fireboat 2. Recommend be approved. 

From chief engineer, recommending that 
the following applications for transfers be 
granted, to take effect from the 16th instant: 
Theodore Sutter, from hoseman fireboat 2 to 
hoseman engine 28; Dennis Mulcahy, from 
hoseman engine 4 to hoseman engine 21; John 
Breen, from hoseman engine 35 to hoseman 
engine 23; J. W. Cole, from hoseman engine 
1 to truckman truck 2; N. Perrone, from 
truckman truck 2 to hoseman fireboat 2; C. 
J. Sullivan, from hoseman engine 5 to truck- 
man truck 7; Frank Lottritz, from truckman 
truck 12 to truckman truck 1. Recommend 
be approved and so ordered. 

From chief engineer, reporting having made 
the following reassignments of probationary 
members, to take effect from the 16th instant: 
A. A. McCarte, from truckman truck 7 to 
hoseman engine 5; R. Sheehan. from truck- 
man truckman 1 to truckman truck 12. Re- 
commend be approved. 

From Francis O'Malley, truckman truck 11, 
requesting a leave of absence from July 31 
to August 15, without pay. Recommend be 
granted. 

From chief engineer, submitting a com- 
plaint against M. J. O'Connor, hoseman en- 
gine 22, for failing to report for duty on time 
at the expiration of a leave of absence on the 
14th instant. Recommend charges be filed. 

All recommendations were adopted. 

MATTERS REFERRED TO THE BOARD BY THE 
ADMISTRATIVE COMMITTEE WITHOUT RE- 
COMMENDATION. 

Report of department physician on physical 
condition of certain members of the depart- 
ment: 

Captain John Fahey stated that he would 
like to submit the report of nerve and oculist 
specialists and was given until August 1 to 
present them. 

J. F. Thompson appeared, and as his arm. 
which was fractured in a fall from the drill 
tower, will never be in condition to enable 
him to do fire duty, it was suggested that he 
apply for a pension. The matter was taken 
under advisement. 

Lieut. Geo. Burry did not appear as he was 
on vacation. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Civil Service certification of eligibles for 
promotion to captain and lieutenant: 

Lieut. Ed. ECehoe was appointed captain; 
Jos. W. Woods was appointed lieutenant. 

NEW BUSINESS. 

Specifications covering the construction of 
80-gallon motor-driven chemicals. Approved. 

Specifications covering the construction of 
motor-driven hose wagons with chemical 
tanks. Approved 

Communication from chief engineer, re* 
commending that sieps in- taken to invite 

bids for motor driven chemicals, tnotor- driven 
hose wagons and chemicals combined and 
20,000 feel 2J-inch, 5.11110 feel 2) inch and 
7,600 feet 1J inch cotton jacketed tire hose, 
Secretary instructed to adverl 1 te for bids. 

Report of Commissioner Dillon on rtquest 
of M Greenberg's Sons to be relea ed 11 



contract for furnishing monitor nozzles. Re- 
commend that the firm be held to their con- 
tract. Adopted. 

"Jolly Boys'' Defeat the " Aristorrats." 

On Friday morning, July 12, at the North 
Beach Play Grounds the "Jolly Boys" from 
truck 2 defeated the "Aristocrats" of truck 
4 in the second game in a series of five games 
to be played for the championship of the 
battalion district, making one win for each 
team; truck 4 representing Battalion 6 and 
truck 2 looking after the honors of Battalion 1. 
There were many features — Shea's hitting 
and base running, and Brennan's catching of 
a foul close to the screen after a run. 

The fielding honors were equally divided 
between both teams— Osberg, Comber, Bow- 
ler, Remy, Valenta, Church, Lavoroni and 
Derham making fine catches. The battery 
work of Morgan, Lavine, Collett and Bren- 
nan desire special mention, each scoring six- 
teen strike outs. The rooting honors belong 
to Lieut. Smith, he being yell leader for a 
bunch of kids he must have worked over time 
to get together. Great praise should be given 
Umpire Barsky, as his decisions were fair 
and impartial. The following was the lineup. 

Morgan pitcher Collett 

Lavine catcher Brennan 

Mohaught first, base Linderberg 

Hackett second base Shea 

Remy third hase Bowler 

Osberg short stop Comber 

Derham right field Manning 

Lavoroni left field Sheehan 

Valenta center field Church 



The firefighters will cross bats with the 
Navy Sailors at Goat Island July 26. Don't 
fail to be there. 



Machinist Delany of the corporation yard 
recently purchased an accordion coffee pot. 
Its original size is a quart, but in case com- 
pany arrives it can be pulled out like an ac- 
cordion. 

The "Firemen's Retort," which appealed 
in last week's issue, was published at the re- 
quest of Hen Currier, who was recently 

retired on pension. 

Driver Martini of engine 5 made a shrwl 
recently for one of bis countrywomen. By 
some mistake he used the Italian flag as a 
design and now lhat government is alter him 
for using the colors without permission. 

Harry Hock, driver of chemical 3, was 
severely injured by a kick from a horse at 
quarters last Monday, and was taken in an 
automobile to St, Luke's Hospital tor treat- 
ment . 

While Mike Hogan ol engine •"> was putting 
;i"..i\ corned beef and cabbage on,' evening 

la si Wee!, his V i |"e put the following qui l'V to 

him: "Oh, Mike, what dn you think are the 

first words our little girl will say? ' "Wl II, 
if she takes alter you, " said Mike, "they will 
probably be, 'What kept you out so late, or 
1 his is s nice 1 ime to come heir 



Trl-i.hnnc Doudai 1255 

U. J. BORCK, THETAILOR 

MAKES A SPECIALTY OF 

FIREMEN'S V UMPORM8 

ALSO FINE CIVILIAN SUITS 
93 EDDY STREET San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening. Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Reach Nurseries, take Castro street car to 23rd. or 

Mission. 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



Phones 



Doujla. 4934 
Home C 2842 



Phones 



i Wesl . 586 
I HomeS 3174 



Serveau Bros. 



FLORISTS 



128 POST ST. 



2110-2114 FILLMORE ST. 



Telephone W j_ r"> 

um^m. Lamanet Bros. 

]* the place of all places to eel the very lalwt and be*t in the way of 

Firemen's Regulation Shirts, 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

Hats and Underwear, Etc. 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



(From PoDular Mechanics.) 

The Auto Fire Engine. 

By J. W. Koley. 

"Yes. things are changed, doggone 
the luck!" 
Said the driver of Engine Three, 
"For they're goin' to fires with an 
auto truck 
And th' horse— he's a Used-to-be. 
It was sugar and oats and a shiney 
coat 
That was dappled and smooth and 
clean, 
And now it's a lump in the driver's 
throat 
And a tankful of gasoline. 

"There was romance then in a driver's 
work 
And somethin' you loved right well; 
It was snap a collar, a cry and jerk 

And off in the streets pell-mell. 
It was 'Steady, Charlie!' and 'Come 
on, Dick!' 
It was sparks where th' hoofs came 
down; 
And many a time that they turned the 
trick 
Of savin' a slice of town. 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



then 



the 



\A/M. F. EGAN 

M. R. C. V. S. 

..VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D. 



1155 GOLDEN GATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 



Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue, Oakland 

THE TRIPP REMEDY CO. 

GUARANTEES TO CURE 

BLOOD POISON 

In every stage 

ACQUIRED OR HEREDITARY 

RHEU MATISM 

ACUTE OR CHRONIC 

PARALYSIS ERYSIPELAS 

CATARRH SCROFULA 

MALARIA LUPUS 

DISEASES OF 
LIVER, KIDNEY AND BLADDER 
DISEASES PECULIAR TO WOMEN 

Call or Write to 

W. G. NOBLE 



Agent and Distributor 



479 Turk Street 



San Francisco 



"There was somethin 
stalls back there 

That was human— or purty near; 
Big eyes and a shiny coat of hair, 

And a beast that a man held dear 
As a life-long friend— but th' auto 
truck 

Is oustin' 'em slick and clean, 
For oil and grease and a lot of muck 

And a tankful of gasoline. 

"And a driver, it used to be, could 
stand 
And pet 'em and rub 'em down, 
And feed 'em sugar outen his hand, 

Dapple and gray and brown. 
But now it's a crank and a chug and 
wheeze, 
And a rattle and roar and grind, 
With a smell of gas to make you 
sneeze, 
And a blue smoke out behind. 

"Th' march of science along th' track, 

I guess you might call it so; 
But gi' me them old fire horses back 

And le' me hitch up and go! 
For a horse was a human sort of thing. 

When he ran with that old machine; 
But an auto truck for a fire— by jing! 

And a tankful of gasoline!" 

Then he rubbed down its nickeled and 
varnished coat. 
And heshined up its great glass eye; 
He polished the brass with a lump in 
his throat 
And a sorryful, long-drawn sigh, 
He lifted the hood where its metal soul 

Lay hidden and all unseen. 
Then unscrewed a cap from a yawn- 
ing hole 
And fed it some gasoline. 



Six hundred thousand Americans go abroad 
every year. 

I Ince the American tourist preferred a foreign 
watch. Now he goes to Europe with a Howard 
bought here — or comes back with a Howard 
bought there. 

He lias an example in the ship's officer on 
the dock, who orders up the gang plank on 
Howard time. 

Vim find more and more of the responsible 
tni ii carrying Howard Watches. 

The great railroads started it. The time in- 
spectora of 180 American railroads hav- officially 
C4 rtifled and adopted the Howard. 

It is carried by leading technical men — by the 
heads of great industrial and commercial en- 
terprises — by scientists — by army and navy 
officers and government officials. 

Many a man buys a Howard for the sheer 
pleasure of owning the watch that Is so will 
sp iken of by nun whose opinion he respects. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
1 1 I- tur it. 

The price of each watch is fixed at the fac- 
tory, and a printed ticket attached— from the 
l7-j.-w.-l (double roller) in a Crescent Extra or 
Boss Extra gold-filled case at J«. to the 23- 
jewel at S1SO— and the Edward Howard model 
at J350. 

Admiral Slgsbee has written a little book. 
"The Log of the Howard Watch," giving the 
record of his own Howard in the U. S. Navy. 
You'll enjoy it. Drop us a post-card. Dept. N. 
and we'll send you a copy. 
HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston. Mass 

T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 
71 WALLER ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Keatny 3523 Home C 1 780 

JOE. H. ROSENBERG 

(Ciiiil au& iHililaru JTaibir 

73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 
Louil Frankenbem. formerly with Roienblum & Abraham. Manager 



Home phone S 2517 

The Little Emporium 

L. R1ZNIC Propnetor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 
2296-98 GEARY STREET 

Nrat Brodcrick 

Telephone We.1 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 

Home C 4992 



Telephone Douglas 2871 

WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WAR R ANT BROKE RS 

630 KEARNY STREET 

COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Home J 2549 

EMIL SCHOBNBE1N 

Fireman Cap Maker 

Formerly of 2 1 si and Poison. 
WILLIAMS. .BUILDING... 

THIRD STREET 



Cor. Mission, Room 307 



SAN FRANCISCO 



L. Lagomarsino 



Phone* Dougl« 474 
Home J 1 494 



J. ChirardUic 



The New Popular 

Restaurant and Coffee Parlor 

Bakery and Confectionery 

French & Rattan Cooking 
115-117 THIRD ST. SAN FRANCISCO 





flREMAN 




VOL. IX. -NO. 30 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Burning of Byron Springs 
Hotel. 

The Contra Costa Gazette of Satur- 
day, July 20, published the most au- 
thentic account of the burning of the 
Byron Hot Springs Hotel, from which 
we take the following excerpts: 

The Byron Hot Springs Hotel, one 
of the most noted health resorts on 
the coast and the most widely known 
spa in California was totally destroyed 
by fire which started at 5 o'clock 
Thursday morning. The origin or 
cause of the fire is not known at this 
time, but it is believed to have been 
started from crossed electric light 
wires in either the kitchen or the 
bakery situated in the basement of 
tho hotel building. 

Thr fire was first noticed a few min- 
utes after 5 a. m., but was at that 
time beyond human control. It spread 
rapidly lo all parts of the building, but 
was not so rapid but that the guests 
in the hotel could be warned and given 
time to dress before being forced to 
flee for their lives. Ample time was 
allowed for all to save their personal 
effects, but on account of the excite- 
ment prevailing only a few had the 
presence of mind to hurriedly pack 
their belongings into suit cases before 
leaving the hotel. The main hotel 
building was burned to the ground, all 
thai i' mail s of the handsome and 
spacious structure being a mass ol 
ashes, the building being a frame 
structure. 

There were aboul loo guests in tin 
hotel al the time of the fire but all 
escaped and no one was injured, near- 
ly all losing the. greater part of theii 



clothing, jewels and personal effects. 
As many of the guests as possible, 
numbering between 40 and 50 are be- 
ing cared for in the cottages and tents 
which were not destroyed, and those 
who remain will have the use of the 
baths which were left in tact as well 
as all of the outbuildings. The re- 
mainder of the guests were taken to 
Stockton on Thursday morning but 
later in the day nearly all departed 
for their homes. 

All of the employes of the hotel and 
guests did everything in their power 
to avert the enormous loss but their 
heroic efforts were in vain. The 
water pressure was good but not suffi- 
cient to stop the spread of the flames 
or to extinguish the fire which in a 
short time gained great headway. 

L. R. Mead, the proprietor of the 
hotel and president of the Byron 
Springs Hotel Company, stated to a 
Gazette reporter on Thursday that a 
temporary dining room will be built at 
once to care for the guests who are 
living in the cottages and shelter tents 
which have been erected about the 
grounds. 

Mr. Mead states that the total loss 
is about $200,000, covered by insur- 
ance to the amount of $110,000. leav- 
ing a-net loss of .$90,000. The com- 
pany is unable to announce iis plans 
but Mr. Mead is authority lor the an 
nounci mi nt thai a n< w, n < re mi den 
and fire-proof hotel will be erei t< d 
upon the site of the former structure 
at once. Architects will be engaged 
immediately to prepare plans for tin 
work ami the contracts will he award- 
Mi as soon as possible in order that 
the new and far more commodious 



Byron Hot Springs Hotel may be ready 
for occupancy by guests next year. 

The hotel building which was burn- 
ed was built in 1904 by the company 
which now owns the property and the 
grounds surrounding the resort in the 
intervening years have been so im- 
proved and beautified that Byron Hot 
Springs has become the show place of 
Contra Costa county and the mecca 
for thousands of tourists and health 
seekers each year. The springs are 
located about three miles from Byron 
but are easy of access which accounts 
| in a large measure for their populari- 
ty. Misfortune seems to have fol- 
lowed Mr. Meade and his associates in 
their resort enterprise for this is the 
fourth time that the hotel has been 
burned at the Byron Hot Springs, 
each time being rebuilt along more 
modern and commodious lines than 
formerly. R. M. Briare, cousin of 
Deputy Recorder J. P. Briare of this 
city is the house-manager of the hotel. 

Manager L. R. Mead has the sym- 
pathy of the whole community at this 
time, his loss being heavy, but true to 
his optimistic nature and bis ability 
to look upon the bright side of adver- 
sity In- is already plannirg fir futu/e 
bel terments and impri vements and 
almost before the ashes have cooled 
work will have begun upon the new 

he,!, 1. 

Fire Chef Bariletl of Si n Mateo is 
urging the calling of an election (e issue 

bonds for the purpose ol constructing 
a new fire house and city building on 
the present site. The Kire Board, at 
its last meeting, drew up a petition lo 
the Trustees asking t hem to give I heir 
us attention to tbe mat ter. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



First on the Job. 



The gong struck thrice. 

The was a wild rush, a tramping of 
feet, a word of command, the great 
doors flew open, the shining motor 
rolled into the street and turned to 
the east. 

An alarm bell under the foot of the 
operator chattered noisily. 

Vehicles turned aside, pedestrians 
ran for their lives. 

The motor suddenly stopped. A 
blazing structure barred the way. 

The crew whirled the motor into po- 
sition. A stout armed fellow seized 
the crank handle and began to turn. 

A rural onlooker turned to a native: 

"What the Sam Hill kind o' fire in- 
gine is that?" he asked in his rich al- 
falfa dialect. 

' 'That ain't a fire ingine," the native 
replied. "That's a movin' picture 
macheen. They're always gettin' 
there first. Here comes the' depart- 
ment now." 

And far down the street could be 
heard the clatter of the fire horses' 
coming hoofs. 

Pacific Coast Fire Chiefs' Convention. 



Fires. Fires in Mines. Specifications 
for2£-inch Hose. Fire Exits and Fire 
Escapes. Auto Apparatus on Steep 
Grades. The Advisability of Mixing 
Fire Alarm Systems. 

Such a chance to see the most mod- 
ern automobile and horse-drawn appa- 
ratus should not be neglected and the 
discussions and other proceedings will 
be of the most practical kind. The 
benefit to the fire service need not be 
mentioned. We think, therefore, we 
have the right to urge you to have 
your city properly represented at our 
meeting. Do not forget that we shall 
cordially welcome other city officials, 
besides those connected with the fire 
service, and we hereby extend an es- 
pecial invitation to yourselves. 
Yours very truly, 
Thomas Davis, 
Chief Victoria Fire Dept. 

President. 
Harry W. Bringhurst, 
Ex-Chief Seattle Fire Dept. 
Secretary. 

Mortimer's Scared of Boats. 



At the twentieth annual convention 
of the Pacific Coast Association of 
Fire Chiefs, which will be held in the 
city of Los Angeles. Cal., on Septem- 
ber 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, we expect a 
large exhibit of tho latest and most 
modern fire apparatus and appliances 
on that occasion, and at the last con- 
vention the executive committee as- 
signed the following topics for read- 
ing and discussion: 

Effect of Politics upon Fire Depart- 
ments. Utility of Fire Cisterns. 
California Saw Mill Fires. Gas Leak- 
ages and Explosions. The Future of 
Motor Apparatus. Chemical Fire En- 
gine Systems. Smoke Protectors and 
Helmets. Keeping Up Interest in 
Volunteer Departments. How Should 
Volunteer Firemen Be Paid. Fire 
Alarm Systems for Small Cities. 
Theatres and Moving Picture Shows. 
The Auto Fire Apparatus in Small 
Cities. Oil Tank Fires. High Pres- 
sure Water Systems. Veneered Build- 
ings. Fireboats. The Storage of 
Gasoline. Spontaneous Combustion. 
The Care of Auto Apparatus. The 
Gasoline Fire Engine. Basement 



"Oh, I want to go a-fishin' 

An' I dassent stir a mite 
Coz my folks is jest so orful 'fraid 

To let me out 'o sight; 
An' they keep me tied up on this hill 

Like Missis Murphy's goats, 
Coz Popper sez the wharves ain't safe, 

An' Mommer's scared o' boats! 

"Popper's never got no time 

'Cept Sunday, which is wrong; 
An' Mommer— well, there ain't no fun 

When wimmin goe- along! 
She's 'fraid o' worms, an' hooks — an' 
scolds 

'Bout spoilin' pants an' coats; 
So it's jest stay home, coz wharves 
ain't safe, 

An' Mommer's scared o' boats! 

"Seem to think a feller'd go 

An' drown hisself right dead! 
Might know I'd be careful 

With such lots o' fun ahead; 
An' I bet I jest could navergate 

Most any craft that floats — 
But what's the use when wharves ain't 
safe 

An' Mommer's scared o' boats! 



Chief Dowell of Portland, Ore., re- 
commended two additional operators 
for the fire alarm system to insure 
safety and expediency. The compli- 
cated switchboard is said to be the 
cause for the additional men. 



Claims Judge "Made Faces." 

A Minneapolis press dispatch of re- 
cent date says: Basing his contention 
on the charge that Judge Horace Dick- 
inson of the District Court made faces 
at a jury trying the civil suit of the 
city against former Fire Chief James 
R. Canterbury, Attorney Albert H. 
Hall filed a motion for a new trial. 
Canterbury's attorney declares that 
the jury was unduly influenced by 
"gestures, facial expressions and 
shaking of the head" by the jurist to 
bring in a verdict of $3,000 and $500 
interest against the defendant. 

In the affidavit filed it is stated that 
the facial gestures were all the more 
noticeable for the fact that the Judge 
"is unusually most urbane and imper- 
sonal in his attitude." The suit fol- 
lowed a trial on a graft charge last fall 
when Canterbury was acquitted. 

Not the Real Thing. 

A recent Philadelphia press dispatch 
says: 

Women of this city who take a lead- 
ing part in the various patriotic socie- 
ties, such as the Daughters of the 
American Revolution, are making a 
concentrated effort to keep from pub- 
lication the muster rolls of the British- 
American or loyalist troops raised in 
this city during the American Revo- 
lution. 

These people, many of whom have 
been posing as the "real thing" in the 
United States founder line, it has been 
explained, fear the publication of 
these muster rolls because they will 
be proof conclusive that the ancestors 
upon whom they base their allegiance 
to the patriotic societies were the 
rankest kind of Tories, and instead of 
being members of the American pa- 
triotic societies these women should 
be members of the societies the ances- 
tors of which fought against American 
freedom. 

The muster rolls, which have been 
in Canada for the last century, are 
about to be copied by the Historical 
Society, which is unable to ol tain 
them through purchase as desired. 

These rolls, numbering more than 
3000, contain the aames of more than 
22,000 Americans who enlisted under 
the King's standard in those days of 
strife for the country's independence 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Having succeeded in obtaining an 
extension of Bessie Barriscale's stay 
at the Alcazar, the management has 
acceded to popular request by deciding 
to present her in "My Wife" next 
Monday evening and throughout the 
week. When she last appeared here 
in the play, about two years ago, her 
grip on the favoritism of the Alcazar's 
clientele was immeasurably strength- 
ened, for she had a role that brought 
out all the charm of her dainty per- 
sonality and enabled her to reveal new 
and charming phases of her art. 
Hence the demand for its revival. In 
the cast with Miss Barriscale will be 
Forrest Stanley and the full strength 
of the Alcazar company. Mr. Stanley 
has never appeared in San Francisco, 
but folk who keep in touch with the 
American stage need not be informed 
that he is rated one of its foremost 
leading men. That he will more than 
meet the existing demands of the Al- 
cazar management has been demon- 
strated by his acting at rehearsals of 
"My Wife," in which he has a part 
that brings out his most effective his- 
trionic methods. 



Empress Theatre. 



Beginning with the matinees to- 
morrow afternoon the Empress will 
inaugurate Grand Opera Week by of- 
fering to its patrons the Metropolitan 
Grand Opera Company of fifteen ar- 
tists, all possessing beautiful voices. 
Their number will include selections 
from the famous grand operas. Vic- 
tor Niblo and his talking birds will 
be an adcUd attraction, who talk in 
three languages. Harry Hay ward, 
supported by Miss Alma Bradley and 
Miss Francis Stafford, will present 
"The Firefly," a bucolic railroad co 
medy that sparkles with subtle humor 
oussituations. Bert Cutler, one of the 
best billiardists in tie country, will 
d smonstrate some of the difficult and 
highly entertaining shots. Two well- 
known character stars, Elizabeth Ken- 
nedy and Ann-i Mack Berlein, have 
forsaken the legitimate field for. a <t>\ir 
of vaudeville in a rrnudy sketches 
titled, "Dart.y and Jean. " Twogiils, 
the Linden Sisters, with vim, dasl 
and beauty, will offer a combination 
of songs, dances and pretty Rowns. 
Princeton and Yale, a charming yon i g 
woman and :i natty yourtg gentleman. 
will offer "600 miles from New York." 
The latest motion pictures will he in 
eluded in the week's offerings. 



SEAGRAVE AERIAL 
MOTOR -DRIVEN HOOK AND LADDER TRUCK 




In service at Vancouver, B. C, Boise, Idaho, San Diego and Los 

Angeles, California. 

Territory covered by the 
Gorham Fire Apparatus Company, Inc. 



SEATTLE 
82 & 84 W. Marion Street 



Seagrave Representatives for the Pacific Slope 

SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Street 



LOS ANGELES 

1223 S. Olive Street 



American Rubber iM fg. Co. 

9-11 (Scale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories — Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 



WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 



Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose, Brass 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Department Sujiplies 



When You're Buyin' Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

I_. H. &. B. I. BILL. 

Sole Distributors for the Pccific Coast 54 3 Oolden (late Ave., San Francisco 





PACIFIC FIREMAN 



P 



'AC1F1 




IREHAN 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manacer 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance $2.00 

Six months 1.00 

ADVERTISE_MENTS 
Inserted on the most favorable terms, especially large and 
continuous ones. 

Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 

Entered as second-class matter March 21. 1908. at the 
Postoffice at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 

SATURDAY JULY 27. 1912 



Firemen Organize for Shorter Work Day. 

Nearly one hundred members of the San 
Francisco Fire Department assembled at the 
Knights of Red Branch Hall on Golden Gate 
avenue, Monday morning, July 22, to form an 
organization for the purpose of devising ways 
and means of securing an initiative petition 
which will place on the ballot at the Novem- 
ber election a charter amendment designed to 
do away with the present 24-hour work day. 

The meeting was called to order by Eugene 
Mulligan of engine 42, who, after a few brief 
remarks was unanimously chosen as Presi- 
dent, and Lieut. Frank L. Smith of truck 2 
was nominated and elected Secretary, after 
which the chair called on Attorney Marc 
Anthony, who has taken great interest in the 
two platoon system, who delivered an ad- 
dress, which caused much enthusiasm. 

Senator E. I. Wolfe followed. He promised 
his hearty co-operation and cautioned the 
members that it was better to take half a 
loaf than loose all by looking for a whole one. 

Battalion Chief Murphy and Alexander 
George were called upon and addressed the 
members, promising their best endeavors 
in support of the amendment, after which a 
roll call of those present was called, 97 an- 
swering to their names. 

A motion was made and carried that it be 
made a permanent organization; that the 
chairman and secretary be permanent officers. 
It was moved and carried that an executive 
committee of six be appointed by the chair. 
A motion was made and carried that one man 
be selected to represent each battalion dis- 
trict; that the executive committee also select 
a man to represent each battalion district. 

After some discussion the following were 
elected to fill the remaining offices: Treas- 
urer, Battalion Chief Thos. J. Murphy; Vice- 
Presidents, Lieut. Chas. Brennan of truck 4 
and F. P. Courtney of engine 4; Sergeant-at- 
Arms, Thos. Bell of engine 42; Corresponding 
Secretary, Sam J. Spear. 

It was the sense of the meeting that the 
executive committee be empowered to request 
voluntary sebscriptions from members of the 
department to carry on the campaign; that 



the executive committee act as a finance 
committee, and that executive officers be ex- 
officio members of the committee. 

The chair called on Mr. Gibson of the ma- 
rine engineers for a few remarks. He con- 
tended that there was no other occupation 
where the hours of labor were so long, and 
that a Chinaman or a Japanese, working as a 
servant in a family would not work the hours 
the firemen do. 

Before adjournment a vote of thanks was 
tendered the daily press for their many kind 
expressions in behalf of the firemen. 

It was unanimously agreed by those present 
that there was a more genuine get-to-gether, 
brotherly feeling manifested than at any 
meeting ever held by the members of this 
department. ____^___ 

Test of Gorham Pumping Engine. 

[Special Correspondence.] 

History was made when the Gorham Engi- 
neering Company tested their new 135 horse- 
power turbine pumping engine on the Frank- 
lin street wharf last Saturday. The time set 
for the official Underwriters' test was8o'clock 
Saturday morning, the engine was on hand, a 
large crowd of interested spectators and sev- 
eral fire chiefs had assembled, when the Sixth 
street company arrived with the hose for the 
official test, Chief Ball was on hand and all 
was ready for the test. 

The 8-inch suction hose was placed in the 
bay, three lines of hose were run out, the en- 
gine was started up and in a few seconds the 
pump was delivering water at the rate of 850 
gallons per minute. 

The engine went through the different tests 
in great style and was the cause of much 
gratification to the builders. After it had 
pumped steady for three hours and a half and 
within four minutes of finishing the test, the 
engine stopped, and upon examination it was 
found that a brass timing gear which had been 
used in place of a steel gear had stripped. 

The engine is now at the Gorham works re- 
ceiving a coat of paint and will be ready for 
another final test in a few days, when it will 
be delivered to the Oakland department, who 
have purchased it at a cost of $9,500. 

The motive power is furnished by a six 
73 x 9 cylinder engine, and is the largest ever 
constructed for automobile or fire apparatus 
use. On level surface it can go fifty miles an 
hour or twenty-five miles on a twenty percent 
grade on low speed. 

The engine is equipped with an air starter, 
and its total weight is approximately 13,000 
pounds. 

The Gorham Engineering Company can well 
feel proud of this pumping engine, which was 
entirely constructed at their own works, the 
plans drawn by their own draughtsman, arid 
it differs vastly from any other pumping en- 
gine made, both in size and pumping capacity. 

The probabilities are that the Gorham Fire 
Apparatus Company will be supplying New 
York and Chicago, as wellasotherlarge cities, 
with pumping engines in the near future. 

The engine is of the multi stage turbine 
type, with a 6-cylinder motor, 7f-inch bore, 
9-inch stroke and developes 144 horse power 



at 1000 piston strokes per minute. The pump 
is fitted with a 6-inch suction and three 3-inch 
discharge gates; is made of gun bronze, is rated 
extra first size and is capable of delivering 1100 
gallons per minute in efficient fire streams, 
draughting from 10 to 15 feet; with a water 
pressure this will be greatly increased. 

The motor is mounted on a specially con- 
structed Seagravt chassis, built to make 35 
miles per hour on the level. 

The entire machine was designed by the 
Gorham Engineering Company of Oakland, 
the motor and pump being built at their shops 
and the chassis built at Columbus, Ohio, by 
the Seagrave Company. It is capable of ne- 
gotiating a 14 per cent grade on the high gear 
with ten passengers, and is the largest auto 
fire engine ever built. It is the first turbine 
engine ever built in the United States, and 
the principal claim of the company is that it 
is the only correct type of auto fire engine. 

Five cities have already ordered eight ma- 
chines; the first goes to Oakland, the next to 
Pasadena, one to Visalia, one to Los Angeles 
and four to San Diego. 

The machine is thoroughly modern in every 
respect, many features being incorporated to 
make it entirely automatic. 

NOTES OF THE TEST. 

Chief Otterson and Councilman Henry of 
Napa, Engineer Bailey of Palo Alto, Chief 
Anderson of the Sacramento department and 
G. M. Altizer, manager of the American- 
La France Company were at the test of the 
new Gorham engine. 

J. L. Phillips, coast representative of the 
Nott Company, and J. Fitzgerald, local repre- 
sentative, were on hand with their Nott ma- 
chine and gave a demonstration of what the 
machine would do. This is the machine that 
was ordered some two years ago by the Oak- 
land department. 

A small boy was heard to ask one of the 
spectators if the pumping engine was a new 
kind of an aeroplane. 

Chief Ball made a good suggestion when he 
suggested that Fitzgerald be given a chance 
to crank the machines. 



Around the Bay Cities. 

[Special Correspondence.] 



The Thirteenth Avenue Improvement Club 
of Oakland recently went on record as oppos- 
ing a full paid fire department in the resi- 
dence districts. Secretary Graham says that 
it is not necessary to have from 25 to 30 fire- 
men laying around each station with nothing 
to do but to amuse themselves playing cards, 
and that a volunteer fireman can handle a fire 
just as well as a lot of paid firemen. 

While we agree with Secretary Graham 
that it will increase the taxes to add a full 
paid department, yet we cannot agree with 
him on his statement that volunteer firemen 
do as good work as regular firemen who are 
properly drilled and ready to go out with the 
apparatus at the sound of the gong. We are 
firm believers in the old saying. "Every man 
to his trade," and a well drilled fireman who 
knows how to handle an axe, life net, ladder, 
extinguisher and find the base of a fire, is far 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



better than a dozen volunteer firemen who are 
a mile or two away from the apparatus and 
the fire when the gong sounds. 

There is a big chance for improvement in 
the Oakland department. While Chief Ball 
has been buying motor apparatus with a lavish 
hand and with the new salt water high-pres- 
sure system in operation, there is very slight 
improvement in the efficiency of the depart- 
ment at a fire. 

The Oakland Tribune under date of January 
10. 1912, had the following to say concerning 
Chief Ball and the department: 

"The fire department, it is said, has been 
allowed to grow and expand under the direc- 
tion of Nicholas A. Ball in a rather haphazard 
manner. Much equipment has been pur- 
chased and the department is recognized as 
one of the best provided with apparatus for a 
city the size of Oakland in the United States. 
An alleged lack of initiative and efficiency 
in some regards among the men, however, is 
spoken of on the streets and among fire in- 
surance men, and it is believed that this may 
be due to the rumored lack of systematic or- 
ganization in the department which makes 
promotion a chance and a haphazard affair. 
The men in consequence are not presented 
with a goal towards which to work, and the 
position of a fireman becomes one that is re- 
cognized as a quiet life broken only by spurts 
of well intentioned energy in case of a big 
fire." 

So it can readily be seen why Secretary 
Graham thinks that under the present head 
volunteer firemen are as valuable at a fire as 
paid firemen, and in some instances we will 
readily agree with him. 

The department is composed of first-class 
men and with the proper drill, and a chief 
who would be more in harmony with the men, 
we can see no reason why Oakland should not 
have the best fire fighters as well as the best 
equipped department in the United States. ] 
In this way the taxpayers would not consider 
a paid department an expense, but it would 
be considered a saving. 

Chief Kenny of the Berkeley depariment 
will urge an increase in the pay of the men in ] 
his depariment. He asks that the same' 
salary be paid in the fire department as in 
the Police department, which is $70 for the 
first year, $80 for the second and $90 for the 
third. Drivers never receive more then $80 
and hosemen more than $75 under the pres- 
ent rule. 

The civil service examinations for captain 
and ranking captain i»> till the vacancy of sec- 
ond engineer, and lor drivers and lieutenants 
to fill the position of captain which will he j 
led vacuo! by prnnioiinn in I he Alameda de- 
p;it i m< Hi , was m'I for August 4, al 10 o'clock. 

Chief Ball estimates that it will take $430,- 
iinii to run the Oakland department for the 
next fiscal year. Ball proposes to spend 
$90,000 of this for additional buildings and 
auto apparatus, including two pumping en- 
gines of huge capacity, aerial truck anil new 
chemical equipment for the new College 
avenue house. II'- also asks that engine 
house No. Con 10, is! Fifteenth street be re- 



built and modernized and that more men be 
supplied so that he may equip the Allendale 
fire house. 

Chief B. F. Eber has again been elected chief 
of the San Leandro Fire Department. Chief 
Eber has been at the head of the department 
for several years, and is an earnest worker 
for the upbuilding of the present department. 
M. J. Frates was appointed assistant chief 
and A. F. Rodger chief engineer. 

Berkeley has purchased a new combination 
chemical and hose wagon. Chief Kenney is 
rapidly replacing the horse drawn with motor 
apparatus. It is understood that the new 
hose wagon will be used in the hill districts. 
Twenty-six additional alarm boxes will be in- 
stalled under the direction of the department. 

Alameda will purchase a new automobile 
for the use of Chief Steinmetz. 

Joseph Mait of the Alameda department is 
recovering from a recent illness and expects 
to be on duty next week. 

F. Lewis, who was laid up with an injured 
leg, is also doing nicely. 

John G. Mattheis, the oldest member of the 
Alameda department, has been retired on a 
pension. 

The Oakland Council has advertised for bids 
for the erection of a new engine house on 
College avenue. This house is to be similar 
to the one to be erected in Allendale. 

Haywards is to vote on the issuance of 
bonds for the purpose of building a new en- 
gine house, purchasing new apparatus, in- 
stalling a modern fire alarm system, and 
building a new city hall. 

Current Fire Items. 

It is rumored that a buggy will be installed 
at the quai tersof engiie 16 as soon as altera- 
tions now under wav are completed. 

Captain Lahey of truck 2. who has been 
suffering from stomach trouble, is out of the 
city on a leave of absence of 30 days. 

Herlihey asked Gannon if he ever rode in 
an auto. "I did, just onct, but I didn't let 
all my weight down," replied Jerry. 

The Fire Commission, at a special meeting, 
July 23, invited bids for 5,0003£-inch, 20,000 
2J inch and 7.500 1J inch feet, of hose. 

Mrs. Hall, wife of Engineer Hall of engine 
22, who died about a vear ago, was granted a 
pension by the Pension Board last Tuesday. 

John ft. Maxwell, at a special meeting of 
the file Commission, held July Hi, was ap- 
pointed second assistant chief, vice Midiis 

key, re tire J. 

Robt. J. Loughrey, at a special meeting of 
the fin' Commission, held Tuesday, July 23, 
was appointed clerk and commissary at the 
corporation yard. 

What is the attraction at Sun Pedro Point? 
The hoys of truck 7, engine 10 and engine 19 
are falling over each other t" get there. Will 
sjme member explain? 

Lieut. Brophy of engine 20 has a scrap hook 
in which he takes much pride. Next i" En- 
gineer Frank Crocket's reminiscences i, f days 



gone by, it is said to be the most authentic 
record of happenings in the department. 

Owing to the Fire Commissioners being out 
of town there was no meeting of the Board 
Friday morning. Probably the next meeting 
will take place Tuesday. 

Ed. Powers, the dude of engine 13, has a 
new dance which he performs in front of the 
house when the ladies are going down town 
shopping in the afternoon. 

Since Jimmy Flood of engine 24 returned 
from his vacation he had a dream that he saw 
two "bucks" on his dresser, but it turned out 
to be an optical illusion in the morning. 

"Only a fire hero," says an exchange, but 
the crowd cheered as with burned hands, he 
held up a small round box containing — "No, 
it wasn't jewelry or heirlooms— merely arnica 
salve." 



A telegram from the Seagrave factory at 
Columbus, Ohio, to the Gorham Fire Appara- 
tus Company of this city last week, stated 
that they had sold eleven pieces of motor-pro- 
pelled fire apparatus to that city. 

Battalion Chief Conlon took a rural friend 
to a ball game recently. After it was over 
the chief asked if he enjoyed it? "Oh, only 
parts of it," said he; "they wasted a good 
deal of time running around the lot, but the 
fights with the umpire were very interesting." 

Dr. Egan, veterinary of the department, 
successfully operated on a fine young horse 
at the department stables last Wednesday. 
The horse cast a shoe, which turned over, the 
animal stepping on the toe calk forced it up 
into the tender part of the hoof, which ne- 
cessitated a very painful operation. 

Captain Conniff of engine 26 has 43 years 
to his credit as a member of the volunteer 
and paid department. As a lad he was a 
member of Pacific 8 in 1863, located on Jack- 
son street, between front and Davis. In 1870 
he became a member of hose 2, and is still 
hale and hearty, fighting fires with the best 
of 'em. 

There is no truth in the report that the 
Firemen's plot at Laurel Hill Cemetery is 
overgrown with wild oats, wild grass and 
weeds. The writer, on his re! urn I mm a visit 
to the quarters of engine 20 inspected the 
pint anil found it In he the host cuid-for in 
the cemetery, We found a man watering it 

who informed us thai up to July i it was all 
overgrown and thai it took the work of two 
men for some days to put it in its present 
line condition. 

Subscribe for the Pacific Firfman 



Telephone Dougla* 1255 

U. J. BORCK, '"' TAJLOB 

MAKES A SPECIA1 IV OF 

FIREMEN'S '. ' UNIFORMS 

ALSO F7A E CIVILIAN SUITS 

93 EDDY STRI I I San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



The Firemen's Plea for the Double Shift. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...PLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening, Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1SS3 

To Reach Nurseries, take Castro street car to 23rd. or 

Mission, 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



Phoi 



1 Dougla. 4934 



Ph. 



iW«m ( 566 
°""lHomeS 3174 



Serveau Bros. 



FLORISTS 



128 POST ST. 



2110-2114 FILLMORE ST 



Telephone 
Home C 2458 



Lamanet Bros. 

Is the place of all places lo gel ihe very latesl and be*! in the way of 

Firemen's Regulation Skirts, 
Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

Hats and Underwear, Etc. 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



\A/M. F. EGAN 

M. R. C. V. S. 

..VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D. 



1155 OOLDEN GATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 



Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



THE TRIPP REMEDY CO. 

GUARANTEES TO CURE 

BLOOD POISON 

In every stage 

ACQUIRED OR HEREDITARY 

RHEU MATISM 

ACUTE OR CHRONIC 

PARALYSIS ERYSIPELAS 

CATARRH SCROFULA 

MALARIA LUPUS 

DISEASES OF 
LIVER, KIDNEY AND BLADDER 
DISEASES PECULIAR TO WOMEN 

Call or Write to 

W. G. NOBLE 

Agent and Distributor 

479 Turk Street San Francisco 



By One of 'Em. 

We are going to ask a favor, 
And we put it up to you; 

We want a shorter workday 
For the fireman in blue. 

At the present we are working 
The whole long twenty-four; 

We could work a little longer, 
But there isn't any more. 

So we're going to ask you people 

To give us boys a lift. 
And help us in our struggle 

For a twelve-hour shift. 

Most any job you work at 
Has an ending to the day; 

You also have a little time 
For pleasure and for play. 

But in the job that we hold 
It's quite a different thing; 

We have to go to fires 
When e'er the bell doth ring. 

If we are eating dinner 

And the bell hits in our house, 
We have to leave our loved ones 

And run and put it out. 

The very best that's in us 
We always try to give, 

And strive and work our hardest 
That the other man may live. 

So if you grant our favor, 
Which I surely think you'll do, 

You'll win the lasting friendship 
From the fire lads in blue. 



Some Exceptions. 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 



Six hundred thousand Americans go abroad 
every year. 

Once the American tourist preferred a foreign 
watch. Now he goes to Europe with a Howard 
boughl here— or comes back with a Howard 
bought there. 

He lias an example In the ship's officer on 
the dock, who orders up the gang plank on 
Howard time. 

Vmh find more and mor< of the responsible 
men carrying Howard Wati 

The great railroads started it. The time in- 
spectors of 180 Amerii an railroads have officially 
cerl Ifii 'l and adopted the Howard. 

li is carried by leading technical men— by the 
hji id( of greal Industrial and commercial en- 
terprlses — bj scientists— by arms and navy 
officers and government officials. 

Many a man buys a Howard for the 
pleasure of owning the watch that Is so well 
spoken of by men whose opinion he respects. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
p iv f<»r It. . m 

TlK' price ol each watch is fixed at the fac- 
toi i and a printed ticket atta hi Q - from the 
L7-jewel (double roller- In a Crescent Extra or 
Boss Extra gold-filled case at $4u. to thi 
jewel at $150 — and the Edward Howard model 
at $350. ,. , ' , 

Admiral Sigsbee lias written a little bonk. 
"The Log of the Howard Watch," giving the 

i of his own Howard in the U. S, Navy. 
You'll enjoj it. Drop us h post-card, Dept N, 
and we'll send you a copy. 
HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston. Mass 

T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AIND JEWELRY 
71 WALLER ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 

ROSENBERG = QABERT CO. 

INCORPORATED 

(toil auii iflUitarij Sailors 

73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 

Present this Add and receive $2.30 dteounl on all Cash Orderiror 
Civi ian Oothei 



Home phone S 2517 

The Little Emporium 

L. RIZN1C Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 
2296-98 GEARY STREET 

Near Broderkk . __ 

Telephone We.1 4824 S \N FRANCISCO 

Home C 4992 



Not every microbe you may meet 

Is mean enough to can. 
The germ that flavors buttermilk 

Is quite a friend of man. 
Drink hearty and you'll live, they say, 
To see the scoffers pass away. 



You can tell a lot of things about a 
man by the way he conducts himself 
in a crowd. 



The Pacific Fireman $2.00 a year. 



Phone Dousl.s 3825 Phone Home C 2996 

MALERBI RESTAURANT 

MALERBI & FRUCOL1. Prop.. 
....First Class Wines, Liquors and Cigars.... 

Regular Week Day Meals. Noon 35 cents. Evening 25 cents 
Sunday Meals 50 cents up 

546 Front St. near Jackson San Francisco 



Telephone Douglas 2871 



WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRAN T BR OKERS 

630 KEARNY STREET 
COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Home J 2549 

EMILSCHOENBHIN 

Fireman Cap Maker 

Formerly of 21st and Folsom 
. WILLIAMS . : BUILDING... 

THIRD STREET 



„or. Mission, noom 



Ro 



307 



SAN I RANCISCO 



L. Lagom 



Phones Douglas 474 
Home J 1494 



J. Chirardllie 



The New Popular 

Restaurant and Coffee Parlor 

Bakery and Confectionery 

French <£- Italian Cooking 
115-117 THIRD ST. SAN FRANCISCO 




VOL. IX. -NO. 31 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



A Lark in Stree t Blaze. 

Early Sunday morning, July 28, a 
fire of unknown origin demolished four 
or five frame buildings on Larkin 
street between Turk and Eddy streets, 
causing a loss of about $10,000. The 
blaze, it is thought, started in Lyric 
Hall, and made considerable headway 
before the fire department got it un- 
der control. 

A man by the name of S. F. Soley, 
a paper hanger, was asleep in the rear 
of the burning stores, but was rescued 
by the firemen after having been over- 
come by smoke. 

Shortly after the fire, from some 
suspicious remarks, the janitor of 
Lyric Hall, Joseph Dobson, fearing 
that he would be charged with setting 
fire to the building, ended his life by 
inhaling gas in his rooms at 945 Gol- 
den Gate avenue. Dobson was found 
dead by the landlady of the lodging 
house when she went to call him at 
the breakfast hour Monday morning. 
The body was removed to the city 
morgue. 

A search of the rooms of Dobson, 
after his body was found Monday 
morning, disclosed two notes, which 
are responsible for a police investiga- 
tion of the fire ordered by Acting Cap- 
tain of Detectives Ryan Monday morn- 
ing. The first note found in Dobson's 
room reads as follows: 

"I was afraid this would be put onto 
me because of that key that was placed 
by some one in my bed. It was not 
for nothing. 

"Adams' paint shop was burnt down 
the night before. Insurance wanted, 
and it was laid at my door. I was no 
coward, as the police called me when 



I went to them for protection. Adams 
and I fell out and he wanted to go way 
so I would be sorry. 

"Joe Dobson." 

The second note was only partially 
finished. It reads: 

"What was the key thrown in my 
bed for and why did Adams' paint shop 
burn down. The—" 

Detective Harry Cook has been de- 
tailed to investigate the case and is 
working with Fire Marshal Towe in 
an investigation of the Saturday night 
fire. 

Dies Fighting Fire. 

At Atlantic City, N. J., Saturday, 
July 27, Captain Ed. Barrett of the 
central fire station was instantly killed, 
George Profatt, chief of the city elec- 
tric bureau, was knocked unconscious 
and a score of firemen were shocked 
at 10 o'clock, when a lantern held by 
Barrett completed a circuit and sent 
5,700 volts from an arc light through 
his body and into the metal trimmings 
of the city hall tower, 120 feet from 
the ground. 

Three thousand persons heard the 
screams from the injured man. Until 
word reached the street the crowd be- 
lieved a platform had collapsed at the 
top of the tower and plunged the fire- 
men to death. 

Men from the central station found 
Carl Kramer and George Messick. noz- 
zle men, stunned on a platform below 
the roof. 

The Col ton (Cal.) Couriei is leading 

a vigorous campaign for better fire 
protection. It is meeting the custo- 
mary indifference but seems to be in 
the fight to stay. 



Two Cars Crush Auto Fire Engine. 

At Chicago, Wednesday afternoon, 
July 24, one fireman met instant death, 
one was fatally hurt and four others 
cut and bruised when an automobile 
combination fire engine and hose cart, 
running at full speed, was caught and 
wedged between two trolley cars, in 
front of the Devon avenue car barns. 

Frank C. Hearing of truck 2 was 
instantly killed. 

The injured are: John P. Geary, 
pipeman engine 9, right arm fractured 
and internal injuries. Geo. Guthrie, 
driver of motor fire apparatus, thrown 
clear by impact; cut and bruised. C. 
Barber, former city fireman, slightly 
cut and bruised. S. Bremner, fire in- 
surance adjuster, slightly bruised. 
Wm. Murphy, pipeman engine 163, 
slightly bruised. 

The fire engine had almost reached 
the car barns when a car suddenly 
shot out of them at right angles to the 
approaching auto fire engine. At the 
same time a north-bound car was seen 
coming on at full speed. 

Guthrie, it is said, put on full power 
in the hope of passing between the two 
cars, but he miscalculated. His ma- 
chine was caught fairly between them. 

Hearing and Geary were riding on 
the side next to the oncoming north- 
bound car and they caught the full 
force of the impact. The others were 
thrown clear. It required an hour to 
separate the wedged cars and auto and 
clear the tracks. 

Fire Chief Seyferlich has ordered an 
investigation. 

Los Angeles' new tire boat Crescent 
was launched recently at San Pedro. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Fire Marshals Meet. 

The annual meeting of the Fire Mar- 
shals' Association of North America 
was held at Detroit July 11 and 12. The 
following officers were elected: Presi- 
dent Alfred Lindback, Manitoba; Vice- 
President, C. E. Ellison, West Virgi- 
nia; Secretary and Treasurer, T. M. 
Purtell, Wisconsin; Executive Com- 
mittee, C. A. Palmer of Michigan, C. 
E. Keller of Minnesota and John W. 
Zuber of Ohio. 

Mr. Lindback is the only survivor in 
office of the original members when 
the association was organized at Wash- 
ington in 1906. He read a paper on 
the organization and history of the 
association and C. E. Keller spoke 
briefly on the general fire prevention 
situation. C. E. Ellison of West Vir- 
ginia read a paper on the reduction of 
the fire waste, holding that the best 
way to get lower insurance rates was 
to have fewer fires. He also advocated 
support of the fire marshal depart- 
ments by the states instead of by taxa- 
tion on the insurance companies, in 
order to relieve prosecutors of preju- 
dice before jurors. 

J. R. Young, North Carolina Insur- 
ance Commissioner, discussed prosecu- 
tions for incendiarism, and J. W. 
Zuber of Ohio explained the procedure 
under the Ohio fire marshal law, which 
was one of the first enacted in the 
West. 

W. E. Mallalieu, general agent of the 
National Board of Fire Underwriters, 
was present at the meeting for the 
first time and made a talk promising 
co-operation and advocating the adop- 
tion of a uniform fire marshal law. 
This was referred to a committee on 
laws and legislation to be appointed 
by the president and will be considered 
at a special meeting of the association 
to be held probably in November prior 
to the meeting of the legislatures. It 
was Voted that the proceedings of the 
meetings be published in book form 
for educational purposes. 

On Friday afternoon the delegates 
were taken by boat to the Rushmere 
Club as guests of the Michigan State 
Fire Prevention Association, where 
dinner was served, followed by ad- 
dresses. C. A. Palmer presided and 
talks were made by several visitors. — 
Investment News. 



Seattle's Progressive Spirit. 

In the matter of purchasing motor 
fire apparatus San Francisco, the lar- 
gest city on the Pacific coast, lags far 
behind many of the smaller towns. 
Edward H. Hamilton, in last Sunday's 
Examiner, says we should be in the- 
lead instead of following along. While 
in Seattle he witnessed a Potlach pa- 
rade in which Seattle's motor fire ap- 
paratus was one of the big features. 
He says of it: 

"I saw six specimens of motor-driven 
fire apparatus, including one massive 
hook and ladder truck. A dealer tells 
me that as soon as "they have put the 
rollers under the present fire chief" 
Seattle will install many more motor 
driven trucks and carts and engines. 

"Yes, but we are to have them in 
San Francisco very soon," says a fel- 
low citizen at my elbow. 

"Exactly, but why don't we lead in 
such matters instead of following 
along? We are the big city of the 
coast. We ought to be out in the fore- 
front of the procession of civic' and 
industrial progress— and here we are 
hardly keeping step. Btllingham and 
Vancouver and Victoria, so I'm told, 
have motor-driven fire engines, while 
San Francisco is "going to have them." 

"As to their efficiency, men in a 
position to know tell me they greatly 
extend the fire fighting capacity of 
the department here. They go up and 
down 15 per cent grades with speed 
and safety, where the horse-driven 
apparatus has to make detours and feel 
its way. Seattle is set upon hills like 
San Francisco and her experience in 
modernizing her department ought to 
be of value to the larger city, so long 
as the larger city hasn't had the gump- 
tion to lead the way. 

"This "gumption" has its basis in 
civic pride and city faith. In these 
matters we of San Francisco can learn 
much from the "Seattle spirit," which 
has been both vaunted and laughed at 
for a long time." ' 



The Mercantile Company of Long 
Beach (Cal.) will install a complete 
sprinkler system in their new building 
at Broadway and Pine streets. Two 
6000-gallon pressure tanks will be used 
with city water as a secondary sup- 
ply.— Ex. 



Examination for Asst. Fire Engineers. 

The San Francisco Civil Service 
Commission will in the near future 
hold an examination for promotion in 
the fire department to the rank of 
assistant chief engineers ^including 
the positions of first assistant chief 
engineer and second assistant chief 
engineer.) 

A resolution was adopted by the 
commission at its regular meeting, 
held July 25, which will permit Loth 
captains and battalion chiefs to take 
the proposed examination for assistant 
chief engineers. 

The Los Angeles Fire Commission 
has recommended the extension of the 
eight-inch salt water mains in San 
Pedro. 

Portland (Ore.) before purchasing 
new auto fire apparatus, has decided 
to send the chief of the fire depart- 
ment and two other representatives 
to San Francisco to inspect the equip- 
ment of that city. 

At Herkimer, N. Y., July 29, Eu- 
gene L. Cook of the Herkimer Fire 
Department was instantly killed and 
three companions were injured, when 
an automobile in which they were 
riding went down a 30-foot embank- 
ment. 

It is said a strong fight will be made 
by the members of the Sacramento 
Fire Department to have the City 
Commission retain Chief Ch&S". W. An- 
derson, who succeeded Chief Guthrie. 
A petition, signed by the entire mem- 
bership of the department has been 
prepared and will be presented to 
Charles Bliss, commissioner of public 
health and safety. 

California Hose Company No. 5 of 
Eureka won the first prize of $250 in 
the recent hose races. The No. 5 run- 
ners hauled the cart two blocks and 
had water in 35 seconds fiat. This is 
the third consecutive time that No. 5 
has won the first prize in a hose tour- 
nament. Eureka No. 2 ci.me second, 
while No. 7 of the Eureka Fire De- 
partment captured third money. But 
three teams from out of town were 
entered in the contest. These were 
Samoa, Korbel and Scotia. Scotia 
made fourth place, while Korbel came 
in fifth and Samoa sixth. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Bessie Barriscaie's fourth and final 
week at the Alcazar begins next Mon- 
day evening with the first stock- 
theatre production in San Francisco 
of "A Roy el Family," in which she 
will be aided by the full strength of 
the regular company and a number of 
specially-engaged players, among the 
latter being Howard Hickman, a for- 
mer Alcazar favorite. No more ap- 
propriate vehicle for the dainty star's 
farewell appearance could have been 
chosen, as the principal character, 
originated in this country by Annie 
Russell, bears all the traits to which 
Miss Barriscaie's art, temperament 
and personality are best adapted, and 
in it she will be no less captivating 
than she was as Juanita or is as 
"Trixie" Dupre. Indeed, it will 
enable her to repeat some of the most 
charming phases of both those roles 
and introduce others with which her 
clientele is less familiar. Mr. Stanley, 
too, will be seen to excellent advan- 
tage in it, the part demanding differ- 
ent treatment to that enacted by his 
current impersonation. 



Empress Theatre. 



Commencing Sunday afternoon, 
Clarence Wilbur and his company of 
young and fascinating school girls is 
the big attraction. They will present 
an anti-toxin for the grouch, "The 
New Scholar," a bucolic bit savoring 
of the old school days. Spencer Kelly 
and Marion Wilder, billed as vaude- 
ville's sweetest singers will return 
with a new repertoire of old and tune- 
ful melodies. Hanlon and Hanlon, two 
brothers who have reached the per- 
fection of physical development, will 
negotiate some feats of strength and 
endurance. Robert LeRoy and Aileen 
Harvey, capably supported, will offer 
a breezy Western playlet entitled 
"Rained In." May Elinore, oneof the 
famous Elinore Sisters, will make her 
first vaudeville appearance as a lone- 
some comedienne. E.J. Moore, a merry 
magician, will furnish the mysterious 
portion of the bill. Miss Edith For- 
sythe, a dainty comedienne, will be 
heard in a monologue. Austin and 
La Morrella, novelty musicians and 
two reels of the latest motion pictures 
will also be included in the bill. 



SEAGRAVE AERIAL 
MOTOR -DRIVEN HOOK AND LADDER TRUCK 



r 


, : m. - 






— »5et^Lfc. , - U )tl -t 


- : v w ir"""Ef 5?^- ~H3e|g^H 


.It <l vmfm ^Cffi 



In service at Vancouver, B. C, Boise, Idaho, San Diego and Los 

Angeles, California. 

Territory covered by the 
Gorham Fire Apparatus Company, Inc. 



SEATTLE 
82 & 84 W. Marion Street 



Seagrave Representatives for the Pacific Slope 

SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Street 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 S. Olive Street 



Am erican Rubber iWfg. Co. 

9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories— Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 



WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 



Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose, Brass 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Department Supplies 

When You're Buyin 9 Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

l_. H. Sc B. I. BILL 

Sole Distributors for the Pcclfic Const S43 (ioldcn Qfcte Ave., Sun Franc Isco 





PACIFIC FIREMAN 



P 



>AClrI 




IREHAN 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 
BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON. Business Manager 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance $2 00 

Six months 1.00 

Entered as second-class matter March 21, 1908, at th« 
PustonTce at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act nf Con- 
gress nf March 3. 1S79. 

SATURDAY AUGUSTS. 1912 



At a meeting of the Pension Board Wed- 
nesday the application of First Assistant Chief 
M. J. Dolan was read and pension was granted. 
The application of Joseph F. Thompson for 
pension was laid over, pending a report from 
his physician. 



The chief's automobile in the month of July 
covered 3640 miles at an expense of $20, or 
about five-ninths of a cent a mile. This one 
fact in itself thoroughly demonstrates the 
efficiency of motor apparatus over horse- 
drawn vehicles. 



At a conference held Thursday between 
Chairman Jennings of the Finance Committee 
of the Board of Supervisors, President Wol- 
cott of the Civil Service Commission, Fire 
Chief Murphy and Auditor Boyle, it was de- 
cided to pay the salaries of battalion chiefs 
which have been held up. 

In reference to the appointment of Battalion 
Chiefs Maxwell and Layden as First and Sec- 
ond Assistant Chiefs by the Fire Commission, 
Chief Murphy stated that for the first time in 
twelve years the Civil Service Commission 
were having a say in the appointment of First 
and Second Assistant Chiefs, and, although 
they had no eligible list for these positions, 
they desire to recommend three of the highest 
on the Battalion Chiefs' eligible list with se- 
niority of service. The objection was that 
two of them were older men than the second 
assistant, recently pensioned on account of 
the age limit. 



Civil Service Fails to Approve. 

The Civil Service Commission Thursday 
evening received a communication from the 
Hoard of Fire Commissioners asking for ap- 
proval of the appointment of John R. Max- 
well and Jas. F. Layden as first and second 
assistant chiefs. The Civil Service Commis- 
sion declined to approve the appointments on 
the grounds that they had not been made in 
accordance with civil service rules. 

A communication from President Branden- 
Btein of the Fire Board was received request- 
ing that the rule of the Civil Service be 
amended to read as follows: 

Kule 26, Sec. 2. When there is no list of 
eligibles for a promotional position in any de- 
partment, appointments to such position 
shall, with the consent of the Civil Service, 
be made from the next lower rank entitled to 



take examination for promotion to such posi- 
tion; provided, that such appointments shall 
be made from the three appointees who have 
the senior standing in such next lower rank; 
*but this proviso shall not apply to promo- 
tional positions of an executiveor of a super- 
visorial nature requiring the management 
and control of men.* All appointments made 
hereunder shall be for a period of sixty days 
and only until examinations are held and an 
eligible list provided. 

Note.— The section enclosed by * is the amendment. 



Tribute to Retiring Assistant Chief Dolan 

President H. U. Brandenstein of the Fire 
Department Pension Board, speaking in behalf 
of the municipality to Chief Dolan, said among 
other pleasant things: 

"No man in the San Francisco Fire Depart- 
ment enjoys any higher esteem of this Com- 
mission. You are regarded as the most effi- 
cient type of man in the department, with 
never a black mark or reprimand against you 
in your forty years of service. 

"We appreciate the fact that you are still a 
young man in spite of your long years of ser- 
vice and, like Othello, with occupation gone, 
but while your health is still good and you 
are active, there are before you many years 
in which to enjoy life and a well-earned rest, 
as Cincinnatus did, after serving his country, 
you can go back to the plow. 

"You were once offered the position of chief 
of this department and because of your natural 
modesty and underestimate n of your own 
ability, declined, thus showing that you were 
a man and a fireman, without ambition, except 
to do your duty. We appreciate these traits 
and regret losing your services." 



Firemen's Amendment Meeting. 

At a meeting of the officers and executive 
committee of the Firemen's Amendment Con- 
vention, held at Veteran Firemen's Hall, July 
29th, the chair announced the following execu- 
tive committee: Wm. Siewert, Wm. Wede- 
meyer, D. O'Donnell, H. J. Temple, Lieut. 
Wm. Conroy, Battalion Chief Murray and 
Alex. George. 

A recess was declared to allow the commit- 
tee to go into executive session, during which 
time the meeting discussed plans fur action. 
The executive committee later reported they 
had elected Alex. George chairman and de- 
cided to arrange for a vote of the entire 
department on the division of hours. 

After some discussion a motion was carried 
that the secretary be instructed to send a 
communication to the Fire Commissioners 
asking for permission to allow the executive 
committee to meet when necessary. 

At an evening session of the executive com- 
mittee and officers the ballot plan for the vote 
on hours and the election of company and dis- 
trict representatives were perfected and sent 
out to all the companies. A motion carried 
that any member of the department, outside 
of the committee, be requested to send in, in 
writing, any plan or part of plan that he might 
think would be a help to the committee in 
arranging a final plan for a two-platoon sys- 



tem and mail to Wm. Siewert, secretary 
executive committee, engine 27. In refer- 
ence to these plans, or their own, the com- 
mittee wishes it understood that, before final 
action is taken on any plan, it will be taken 
up with the chief engineer and the Board of 
Fire Commissioners. 

Discussion on several plans followed, but 
no final action on any other matter was taken. 
The committee then adjourned to meet Thurs- 
day at 10 a. m. 

San Francisco Fire Commissioners 

The Board of Fire Commissioners met in 
regular session Wednesday, July 31 (all mi in- 
here present) and transacted the following 
business: 

Report of the Administrative Committee on 
communications with recommendations: 

Chief engineer, recommending that the 
Board fix a certain day and hour for holding 
its regular meetings. Recommend that Fri- 
days at 8 o'clock a. m. be fixed as time for 
holding regular meetings of the Board. 

Chief engineer, reporting having restored 

I. astillo, truckman truck 12, to duty on 

the 16th instant, his suspension of six months 
having expired on that date. Recommend be 
filed. 

Chief engineer, submitting report from Jas. 
Herlihy, acting engineer engine 34, relative 
to test of coal briquettes for heater fuel. 
Recommend be referred to chief engineer to 
take up with the Supplies Committee of the 
Board of Supervisors. 

Chief engineer, submitting a complaint 
against Frank Morgan, stoker engine 30, for 
violating an order of Board in removing his 
bell and relay from residence without notify- 
ing the Department of Electricity. Morgan 
appeared before the Administrative Commit- 
tee and pleaded ignorance of the existence of 
the order in question and stated that he had 
no intention of wilfully violating the same. 
Recommend complaint be dismissed. 

Marc Anthony, submitting copy of proposed 
petition from members of the department 
relative to the two-platoon system. Recom- 
mend be filed. 

Civil Service, requesting a list of names of 
pi rsons now servingin the department as act- 
ing lieutenants. Filed and the secretary di- 
n cted to comply. 

City Attorney Long, submitting an opinion 
in the matter of the residential qualifications 
of Samuel Bermingham for the position of 
Superintendent of Engines in this depart- 
ment. Recommend be filed and copy for- 
warded to Civil Service Commission. 

Wm. Lefevre. hoseman fireboat 1, tender- 
ing his resignation as a member of the de- 
partment to take effect from the 19th instant. 
Recommend be accepted. 

J. S. Parry, Grand Secretary F. O. E., re- 
questing a copy of the rulings and headings 
of the monthly disbursement book used in 
this office. Recommend be referred to sec- 
retary to comply with request if possible. 

John Leahy, captain truck 2, requesting 
that he be granted a leave of absence for one 
month, with pay, on account of sickness. Re- 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



commend be granted. 

Petition from members of the department, 
requesting permission to meet for the purpose 
of placing before the people a charter amend- 
ment establishing a two-platoon or two-shifl 
system in the department. Recommend re- 
quest be granted, provided meeting be held 
on the members' own time. 

Department physician and surgeon, sub- 
mitting a report relative to the physical con- 
dition of Wm. A. Robling, lieutenant engine 
2, and recommending his retirement on pen- 
sion. Recommend be referred to Board of 
Fire Pension Fund Commissioners. 

Kohler & Chase, requesting that motor- 
driven apparatus be substituted for the horse- 
driven in the quarters of hook and ladder 
company 1 on O'Farrell street near Stockton. 
Recommend be taken under advisement. 

American-La France Fire Engine Company, 
relalive to tire equipment for motor-driven 
fire apparatus. Recommend be filed. 

Committee for Investigation of Acts oi 
Valor, submitting a report in the matter ol 
act of Frank Lerman, captain engine 23, in 
taking a woman from a burning building at 
Clay street and Presidio avenue on June 29, 
1912, and stating that there was no special 
merit attached to this act. Recommend re- 
port be approved and placed on tile. 

Chief engineer, recommending thai the ap- 
plication of T. J. Harrington for a transfer 
from lieutenant chemical 5 to lieutenant truck 
5 be granted, to take effect August 1, 1912 
Recommend be approved and so ordered. 

H. Hock, driver chemical 6, making appli 
cation for salary on account of an injury to 
testical from kick of horse while working at 
the quarters of his company on July 16, 1912. 
Recommend salary be allowed. 

Chief engineer, recommending that gasoline 
storage tanks and lubricating oil tanks be in- 
stalled in the quarters of truck 4. Recom- 
mend be approved and secretary instructed to 
advertise for bids. 

W. H. Vogel, hoseman engine 17, request- 
ing that he be allowed salary fur eight days 
of the month of July that he was absent from 
duty on account of. sickness. Recommend be 
granted. 

Edward Kehoe, captain engine 4, request inc. 
that he be granted a leave of absence, with 
permission to leave the ciiy, on Hccount of 
sickness, commencing August 1. Recommend 
be granted. 

CRfef engineer, recommending that the 
Civil Service Commission br directed to ret 
tify twelve eligible* from its list uT firemen 
for appointment as temporary substitutes in 
the department, the same to be used as a re- 
serve list from which appointments can be 
made. 

Chief engineer, t i orting having made the 
following re-assignments of probationary 
members, to lake effect. August. !, 1912: A. 
J. Galli, from hoseman el glne SO to hoseman 
eneine M; .1, H. Grimonstein, hoseman engine 
14 to hoseman engine 30. Recommend be 
approved. 

Civil Service Commission, (submitting a 
complaint filed as to the age qualifications of 



lames Lowe, temporary engineer of fireboat 4. 
Your committee reports that after an investi- 
gation of the above complaint it was unable 
to find any facts in substantiation of said 
complaint, and recommend that a communica- 
tion to that effect be forwarded to the Civil 
Service Commission, together with a copy of 
the testimony of Lowe and a copy of affidavit 
submitted by him. 

Civil Service Commission, requesting a list 
of all substitutes employed in department 
during month of July, whose names were not 
certified by that Commission for appoint- 
ment. Recommend secretary be directed to 
comply. 

Civil Service Commission, relative to tem- 
porary appointment as second assistant chief 
engineer and submitting copy of rule govern- 
ing the same. Filed. 

Civil Service Commission, advising Board 
that all temporary appointments must be first 
authorized by that Commission before being 
made. Filed. 

Charles Centlivre, hoseman engine 33, re- 
questing that he be granted a leave of ab- 
sence for three months, without pay, on 
account of sickness, commencing Aucust 1. 
Recommend be granted. 

All recommendations were adopted. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Trial of M. J. O'Connor, hoseman engine 
22, for absenting himself from duty without 
permission on the 13th instant. Pleaded 
guilty. Deprived of pay during suspension 
and ordered transferred. 

NEW BUSINESS. 

Chief engineer, submitting a complaint 
against Frank Lotlritz, truckman truck 12, 
for absenting himself from duty without per- 
mission. Charges ordered filed. 

Resolution inviting proposals for furnishing 
a filing card system covering the assignment 
of companies to alarms of fire. Ordered ad- 
vertised. 

Battalion Chief John R. Maxwell was ap- 
pointed First Assistant Chief and James 
Layden Second Assistant Chief, subject to 
approval of the Civil Service Commission. 

FRIDAY'S MEETING OF THE COMMISSION. 

Wm Everson, engine 8, was called to an- 
swer complaint of being under influence of 
liquor while on duty. He explained that he 
had taken brandy Oil account of sickness, and 
was ordered bach to duly until Captain Davis 
returned t rem vacation. 

Around the Bay Cities. 

[Special Qovreapondencc, I 

Bids were r ived by the Berkeley Com- 
missioners Tuesday for a new comliinatiun 
chemical and hose wagon, and was referred 
to Commissioner Norton 

The l:.,,,d of T.-.ide of Eticfimnnd iTiis re- 
ceived word thai the Board oi Underwriters 
of Stiu Francisco will cancel fire insurance 
policies of the residents of the hill seclion of 
the west si.le of this city because of the in- 
adequate water supply. 

The Oakland Commissioner* voted to pay 
the Noil Fire Engine Company $7,760 on the 
pumping eng -ecenilv delivered by this 



company. 

The new Seagrave combination chemical 
and hose cart recently purchased by the 
Richmond department came into good use 
last week. A fire threatened a dwelling in 
the hill district and it was only by the quick 
efforts of the department in getting to the 
fire that saved the residence. 

A new ordinance was passed by the Oak- 
land Commissioners requiring that ropes be 
stretched one block each side of a fire, and 
that no one be allowed in this space except 
those having permission from the command- 
ing officer. 



Naval Sailors Defeat Firefighters. 

A game of baseball was played at Yerba 
Buena Island Friday, July 26, when the Naval 
training team defeated the Firemen by a score 
of 11 to 8, but the firemen are not humiliated 
by their defeat, for they had the game won 
until the umpire took a hand, calling foul balls 
fair, and his decisions on balls and strikes was 
something awful. The firemen stood for all 
of this, but when he started coaching it was 
the limit; he deliberately told the pitcher to 
throw to second to catch Morgan, Who was 
stealing. The game started with the firemen 
at the bat, and with two out and two on bases 
Shea hit a home run, clearing the bags- 
three runs. 

The sailors could do nothing in theirturn 
at the bat, and from there on until the eighth 
inning it was nip and tuck, with the firemen 
leading bv the score of 8 to 5.' "It was in this 
inning that the umpire showed how they 
handed decisions to a visiting team, for when 
the inning was finished the sailors led 11 to 8, 
this score standing, as neither side scored in 
the ninth. 

The features of the game were the hitting 
and base running of Shea, Hughes. Morgan 
and Moholy and fielding of Hughes, Voke and 
McNulty. The line up was as follows: 
Fin nu » Sailors 

Moholy. Eng. II r.it.her Warren 

Comber ' 20 Ditcher . Wallensbee 

stn i " 2Q 1st bo e. Madden 

Gavin " 31 2nd base lvtr,, ky 

McNulty '.' 89.. 3rd ba • I 

Mors n " till short Bib]} tiiimlcy 

Huuhes "41 i nlit tied ftiu 

Voke 6 renter held Williams 

Douulas. Yard l.-lt li.l.l Black 

The boys have arranged tor a number of 

games in the near inline 

Captain Charles Smith of eneine 11 is a 
veteran of the department. Be is hot a large 

man by any means, being only five feet two 
and a-half, just half an iurli less than Batta- 
lion Child' Murray, but he's all bun- 
dle of nerves and wires one oi I he gamiest 
little iiretie In eis m i he seiviee. When the 
apparatus rolls he"* always 1 on the job. 

» Doualai 1255 

U. J. BORCK, '"'■ tailor 

MAkl S A SPI < IAI n i'l 

FIREMEN'S '. ' UINII < IRMS 
ALSO FINE CIVILIAN srrrs 

93 EDDY STREET San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 

JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs, 

Gardening, Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Reach Nurseries, take Castro street car to 23rd, or 

Mission. 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



»™!teS 



Phone. 



I Wat . 586 
i Home S 3174 



Serveau Bros. 



FLORISTS 



128 POST ST. 



21 10-21 14 FILLMORE ST. 



Telephone 
Home C 24 58 



i2 Lamanet Bros. 

It the place of all place* to set the very laleit and hell in the way of 

Firemen's Regulation Shirts, 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing floods 

Hats and Underwear, Etc. 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



NA/M. F. EGAN 

M- R. C V. S. 

VETERIMARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. 0.. 



1155 GOLDEN GATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 



Phone Merrill 4447 

H. G. WILLIAMS 

Agent Northern California for the 

Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 

1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 

THE 
PACIFIC FIRE! MAN 

JOB DEPARTMENT 

IS NOW PREPARED TO PRINT 

LETTER HEADS 
BILL HEADS 
STATEMENTS 
ENVELOPES 
BUSINESS CARDS 
WEDDING INVITATIONS 
SHIPPING TAGS 
BILLS OF FARE, ETC 
479 TURK STREET 
Phone FRANKLIN 6867 



Inquisitive Willie. 

My pa, he didn't go down town 

Last evening after tea, 
But got a book and setted down 

As comfy as could be. 
I tell you I was offal glad 

To have my pa about 
To answer all the things I had 

Been tryin' to find out. 

So I asked him why the world 

Is round instead of square, 
And why the piggies' tails are curled 

And why don't fish breathe air, 
And why the moon don't hit a star, 

And why the dark is black. 
And just how many birds there are, 

And will the wind come back. 

And why does water stay in wells, 

And why do June bugs hum, 
And what's the roar I hear in shells 

And when will Christmas come, 
And why the grass is always green, 

Instead of sometimes blue, 
And why a bean will grow a bean 

And not an apple too. 

And why a horse can't learn to moo, 

And why a cow can't neigh, 
And do the fairies live on dew. 

And what makes hair grow gray, 
And then my pa got up and, gee, 

The offal word he said: 
I hadn't done a thing, but he 

Just sent me off to bed. 



Who He Was. 



A traveler saw a woman take a man 
by the collar, yank him up the steps 
into a railroad car, jam him down into 
a seat, pile up a valise and two big 
brown baskets with loose covers and 
long handles at his feet and say: 

"Now, sit there until I help Mary 
Jane on the car, and don't move till I 
come back." 

When the woman reached the door 
the traveler said to her: 

"Is that man your husband?" 

"Naw!" roared the woman, "He's 
my daughter's husband, and she 
hasn't spirit enough to say her soul is 
her own." 



Phone Douglas 3825 



Phone Home C 29% 



MALERBI RESTAURANT 

MALERBI & FRUGOLI. Prop.. 
....First Class Wines, Liquors and Cigars 

Regular Week Day Meali, Noon 35 cent*. Evening 25 cent* 
Sunday Meal* 50 oenu up 

5-46 Front St. near Jackson San Francisco 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 

Six hundred thousand Americans go abroad 
every year. 

Once the American tourist preferred a foreign 
watch. Now he goes to Europe with a Howard 
bought here — or comes back with a Howard 
bought there. 

He has an example In the ship's officer on 
the dock, who orders up the gang plank on 
Howard time. 

You find more and more of the responsible 
men carrying Howard Watches. 

The great railroads started it. The time in- 
spectors of 180 American railroads have officially 
certified and adopted the Howard. 

It is carried by leading technical men — by the 
heads of great industrial and commercial en- 
terprises — by scientists — by army and navy 
officers and government officials. 

Many a man buys a Howard for the sheer 
pleasure of owning the watch that is so well 
spoken of by men whose opinion he respects. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pay for it. 

The price of each watch is fixed at the fac- 
tory, and a printed ticket attached — from the 
17-jewel (double roller i in a Crescent Extra or 
Boss Extra gold-filled case at $40. to the 23- 
jewel at $150 — and the Edward Howard model 
at $350. 

Admiral Sigsbee has written a little book. 
"The Log of the Howard Watch," giving the 
record of his own Howard in the U. S. Navy. 
You'll enjoy It. Drop us a post-card. Dept. N. 
and we'll send you a copy. 
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T. H. KILGO 

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73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 

Preaenl thii Add and receive $230 dt'Count on all Ca ah Order* for 
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L. RIZNIC Proprietor 

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UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 
2296-98 GEARY STREET 

Near Broderuk 
Telephone W«l 4824 SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone Douglai 2871 



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WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRA NT BROKERS 

<iv 

630 KEARNY STREET 

COR COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Home J 2549 

EMIL. SCHQBNBBIN 

Fireman Cap Maker 

Formerly of 21st and Folsom 
... WILLIAMS. : BUILDING... 

THIRD STREET 

Cor. Mission, Room 307 SAN FRANCISCO 



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►acifi 




flREMAN 




VOL. IX. -NO. 33 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, AUGUST 17, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Omaha's Two-Platoon System. 



Tom Mitchell, a member of hook and 
ladder company No. 1 of the Omaha 
Fire Department, writing to the Fire- 
man's Herald under the head "In 
Defense of The Two-Platoon," says: 

"At the time the two-platoon sys- 
tem was adopted in Omaha, Neb., 
(July 1, 1907), the department con- 
sisted of 118 men— 4 engine companies, 
4 truck companies and 7 hose compa- 
nies; 9 men in each engine company; 
3 truck companies of 8 men each, and 
one truck company of 12 men; 7 hose 
companies, 6 men each. 

"The system of regular offs was 24 
hours every 6 days. This left 19 men 
off every day, and 95 men in quarters, 
The meal hours were divided into 
3 shifts. Thus, 9 hours each day the 
department was run with 57 men, ex- 
actly one-half of the force, not count- 
ing chiefs. 

"Now here is where the two-platoon 
comes in. The department now con- 
sists of 203 men, 102 men on each 
shift, chief and two assistants on con- 
tinuous duty. There are now in ser- 
vice 2 engine companies, 9 men each; 
2 engine companies, 8 men each; 4 
truck companies, 5 men each; 1 truck 
company of 12 men, and 10 hose com- 
panies with 4 men each. 

"There have been 3 hose companies 
and 1 truck company added to the de- 
partment since the two platoon was 
adopted; 2 motor combination hose 
and chemical cars have been pur- 
chased out of surplus of fire appro- 
priation. In fact, all our apparatus 
is comparatively modern. You can- 
not dispute our efficiency has increased 



100 per cent and discipline is un- 
impaired. 

"There are, I think, three things to 
be considered before you pass judg- 
ment on a department, namely, appa- 
ratus, discipline and efficiency of the 
men that compose the working force. 

"As I have shown above, the appa- 
ratus of the Omaha Fire Department 
has been materially bettered since the 
adoption of the two-platoon system. 
As to discipline, nobody who knows 
the facts will deny that it has not suf- 
fered since the two-shift plan was put 
in force here. And that the authori- 
ties consider that Omaha firemen are 
efficient may be judged from the fact 
that since the introduction of two 
platoons our salaries have been raised, 
and the pension has been increased 
from quarter to half pay." 

Relics of Chief Krauth. 



The Oakland Tribune of August 10 
says: All of the fire relics of the late 
Fire Chief F. K. Krauth, which for 
years hung in his office, have been re- 
moved and are now stored in the tower 
of the Webb avenue engine house. 
The relics comprised trappings and 
ornaments from many of the old-time 
fire engines and hose reels of the San 
Francisco department and were used 
in the early sixties. 

Under the terms of the will of the 
late chief, these relics will be given to 
the Alameda County Relief Society, 
when a proper room for their display 
is provided. The first choice of the 
relics and pictures were given to the 
successor in office of the chief, but 
Chief Walter Steinmetz does not care 
to accept them, explaining that he 



does not know the history connected 
with them and is unable therefore to 
answer the queries as to their origin 
asked by almost everyone that entered 
the office. 

Among the relics is a bell found in 
Portland, from the old four-wheeled 
hose carriage of Rincon hose No. 6, of 
San Francisco. Other ornaments of 
various old-time hand drawn appara- 
tus of the Pacific metropolis and pho- 
tographs of the early firemen, helmets, 
speaking trumpets, etc., complete the 
collection. 

Some of the ornaments are the prop- 
erty of Thomas F. Casey, a fellow fire 
fighter of Chief Krauth, and at present 
a resident of San Francisco. 

The old fire bell is one of these. This 
bell was found in a basement in a 
Portland engine house. It was brok- 
en into a dozen pieces, but these were 
eagerly gathered up by Casey and 
Krauth, brought to Alameda and were 
pieced together by Engineer John 
Matthais. The old Rincon carriage, 
which was sold to the city of Portland 
after it had outgrown its usefulness 
in San Francisco, was an exhibit at 
the Lewis & Clark Exposition. 

Meeting Veteran Firemen's Association. 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
Veteran Firemen's Association was 
held at headquarters, 368 Fell street, 
Tuesday, August 6. The meeting -was 
called to order at 8 o'clook p. m., 
President John S. Farley occupying 
the chair. All of the officers, direc- 
tors and a large number of the mem- 
bers answered roll call. Comrades 
Bell, Moonoy, Mahoney. McAdoo and 
Drummond still on sick list and about 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



the same as when last reported. The 
picnic committee reported progress 
and at the next meeting the final re- 
port will be made. The committee on 
revision of by laws made a progressive 
repprt. The proposed revision had its 
first reading and will come up again at 
the meeting September 10th. The 
next meeting night falls on September 
3. Owing to September 3 -being elec- 
tion day, and in accordance with our 
law the meeting will be held the fol- 
lowing Tuesday, September 10, at 
which the proposed revision of the 
law will be read a second time and 
under the proper head of business will 
be submitted to a vote either for adop- 
tion or rejection. The committee on 
uniform made its final report, stating 
that they could not interest enough 
members in the scheme; the commit- 
tee asked ..to be discharged, where- 
upon' they were discharged with 
thanks. A resolution was unanimous- 
ly adopted, giving to the members of 
the fire department the useof our hall, 
gratis, during their campaign of their 
charter amendment. Miscellaneous 
and unfinished business was rapidly 
disposed of; bills to the amount of 
$182.55 were ordered paid. The re- 
ceipts of the evening was $293. Two 
applications for membership were re- 
ceived, when the meeting adjourned 
at 10 p. m. After adjournment a 
card game was inaugurated and lasted 
one hour. 



Mayor Wants Cut in Insurance Rates. 

Last Saturday Mayor Rolph trans- 
mitted to the Board of Fire Under- 
writers of this city the report which 
the insurance men requested from 
Chief Murphy containing formal an- 
nouncement that the high pressure 
water system for fire protection was 
ready for business. 

Mayor Rolph's .letter ^dthe Under- 
writers in part. is as follows: 

"This data is placed in your hands 
■ for the purpose of officially informing 
you that a 'large portion of the city is 
now actually enjoying the fire protec- 
tion sought by the people of San Fran- 
cisco when bonds were^oted for con- 
structing the high pressure system, 
and I respectfully request that you 
immediately take u-p- with the authori- 
ties of this' city and comity the con- 



sideration of those material reductions 
in the rates of fire insurance which 
your association has agreed to make 
upon a satisfactory demonstration of 
the efficiency of the high pressure 
system."' > \ 

Following the above letter is Chief 
Murphy's report, sent through -the 
Mayor to the Underwriters, gives de- 
tails of the auxiliary system. The 
chief writes: 

"We are sending you herewith a 
map of the northeasterly part of San 
Francisco showing the location of 
mains and hydrants of the auxiliary 
water supply system for fire protec- 
tion. The lines drawn upon this map 
in red pencil indicate the pipe lines of 
this system, which are in service at the 
present time, August 9. The blue lines 
indicate pipes which are completed and 
will be put in service on or before Sep- 
tember 1. 

"In addition to these pipelines the 
Ashbury Heights tank and pumping 
station No. 1 are in service. The Ash- 
bury Heights tank is situated in Clay- 
ton street between Seventeenth and 
Eighteenth streets, at an elevation of 
465 feet, and holds 5O0,GOOugallons. 
Pumping station No. 1 is situated at 
Second and Townsend streets, and has 
a capacity of 12,000 gallons per minute 
against a pressure of 300 pcfunds per 
square inch. Against lower pressures 
the capacity of. this station will be 
somewhat greater — we estimate -ap- 
proximately 15,000 gallons per minute. 
All of theiiose wagons in this depart- 
ment are equipped with hose winch 
will safely withstand the pressures to 
which it may be subjected when used 
in connection with this. system."- 

1 Seattle, Wash. 

•It is said extensive repairs or re- 
modeling of buildings in which seven- 
teen of the Seattle fire companies are 
housed is asked by Chief Frank L. 
Stetson in his estimate of expenses 
for the ensuing fiscal year, filed with 
the finance committee of the City 
Council week before last. Estimates of 
salaries for new companies, provision 
for which was not made during the 
present year, represents an additional 
amount of $40,260 over present allow- 
ance. The total amount asked for sala- 
ries and other expenses is $797,968. 



Portland, Ore. 

Much regret is felt throughout Ore- 
gon over the news that Jos. Buchtel, 
at the age of 82, has completely lost 
his sight. Buchtel was an important 
factor in both the volunteer and paid 
fire departments of Portland. He as- 
sisted in organizing Multnomah en- 
gine company No. 2, which is now a 
fraternal organization, owning prop- 
erty to the amount of $30,000. He 
was chief of the Portland paid fire de- 
partment for two years and put into 
service the first fireboat, the Vaughn. 

He invented several important de- 
vices for fighting fires, including an 
electric fire hose, by which the man 
at the hose end can signal when to 
turn on and turn off the water. 



Chehalis, Wash. 



Chief Long, Chehalis, Wash., re- 
cently appeared before the City Com- 
mission and asked that the two. fire- 
Imen who are on duty all the time, be 
allowed a vacation on full pay, for a 
week or ten days, as he could at the 
present time get a man who is capable 
of doing the work to relieve them. 
Long's request met with the approval 
of the commission, who even gave 
more than was asked for, in deciding 
that the men should have a vacation 
of two weeks each, they to decide as 
towho should go first. 



Aberdeen, Wash. 



•Engine company 2 of Aberdeen, 
Wash., recently had a dry kiln fire 
that took 9i hours work to extinguish. 
Th-ree streams were used from the 
■Wr%t size Metropolitan and one frcm 
< the combination gas engine, both tak- 
ing water from the river and running 
the full 9J hours without a shut down. 



The Los Angeles Council recently 
ordered two Gorham motor-driven 
combination ene-inesand hcse wapons. 
The engines will have a capacity of 
11.000 gallons per minute, and are 6 
cylinder, 135 horse-power motors mak- 
ing three engines now in course of 
construction for that city by the Gor- 
ham people. 

Chief Clifford's suggestion that the 
fiire department apparatus at Pasa- 
dena, Cal., be motorized is receiving 
attention. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Laurette Taylor's versatility will be 
given ami'le scope for exhibition in 
"Barbaraza, " the new play by J. 
Hartley Manners, which is to be given 
its first presentation on any stage next 
Monday evening at the Alcazar, as 
she appears as an old woman in the 
prologue and a young girl throughout 
the succeeding acts. It promises to 
be a startling physical metamorphosis, 
and rehearsals have shown that the 
temperamental transformation will be 
made less complete by the art of the 
actress, which is equally convincing 
in each of the widely-variant charac- 
ters. This h the most daring flight 
yet undertaken by Miss Taylor, whose 
fame has largely been acquired 
through her success in risky ventures. 
Essentially a comedienne, her two 
roles in "Barbaraza" invite almost 
tragic treatment, but she manages to 
lighten them without impairing their 
serious intent or even hinting at in- 
congruity. There is no possibility of 
"Barbaraza" being retained longer 
than a week, as "The wooing of Eve," 
a new comedy written for Miss Taylor 
by Mr. Manners, must be presenter! 
on Monday evening, August 26. 

Empress Theatre. 

At the Empress Sunday afternoon, 
with "The Models of the Jardin de 
Paris" will be the headline attraction. 
As a special feature attraction John 
White will present his comedy circus 
and Punch and Judy, his two unrida- 
ble mules and a number of perform- 
ing dogs and leaping pray hounds. 
Superlative adjectives, it is said, 
would be the most fitting manner of 
introducing Miss Constance Windom 
and her capable supporting company, 
in the sparkling little comedy gem, 
"An Un-To-Date Invention." Hugo 
Lutgens, a Swedish dialect comedian 
of ability, will offer some clever pat- 
ter and parodies. Veroni Verdi, a 
beautiful dark-eyed daughter of sunnj 
Italy, whose ability for coaxing intox- 
icating strains from a violin, is said 10 
be exceptional. Jean De Lisle and 
Sarah Vernon, two good-looking girls, 
will nil' •!• some catchy songs and 
dainty dances. All' Holt, the Ameri- 
can mimic and comedian, will present 
his laugh-provoking imitations. Billy 
Hon, a clever chattering cartoonist, 
the Three Lemon Sisters in a burles- 
que entitled "The Jolly Serenaders" 
and Twilight motion pictures will con- 
clude one of the best bills of the season. 



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PACIFIC FIREMAN 



P 



>ACIFI 




IREITAN 



PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 
BY 

JAS- K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance $2.00 

Six months LOO 

ADVERTISEMENTS 
Inserted on the most favorable terms, especially large and 
continuous ones. 

Editorial Rooms and Business Office, 479 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 

Entered as second-class matter March 21, 1908. at the 
Postoffice at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 3. 1879. 

SATURDAY AUGUST 17, 1912 



The members of the Santa Cruz Fire De- 
partment are very much elated over their 
American - La France double - forty motor 
chemical combination hose wagon, which was 
delivered last week. 



Owing to Percy "Kid" Williams having 
been called out of the city the first of the 
week, his "Reminiscences of the Los Angeles 
Fire Department" is omitted in this issue, 
but it will be continued on his return. 



well fur the art preservative. Its pages are 
copiously illustrated, depicting the marvelous 
growths of the many varied industries of 
Contra Costa county, and is replete with val- 
uable information for the home-seeker, for 
the man of moderate means as well as the 
man of millions. 

Alex. George's Address in Behalf of the 
Two-Platoon. 



Chief H. R. Schaffnit of the Bakersfield 
department is in New York as the guest of 
the city fire department. He is taking up 
the problem of motoring the fire department 
of his home citv along lines similar to those 
recently adopted in New York. 

Friday morning's Chronicle prints a column 
and a half article on the condition of the high 
pressure system of this city and if true is cer- 
tainly to be deplored. It states that pipe by 
the mile has been ordered hut there is no 
money to lay it, and that which is already 
laid is leaking at thp rate of 100.000 gallons j 
per day. It is hoped that on a more thorough 
investigation that matters are not as bad as 
at first represented. 

The Petaluma Courier says: "Our prisons 
and reformatories contain more than 100,000 
miserable, wretched men and women; al! of 
them were once innocent little children, who 
might have become happy and useful citizens, 
had they received a careful training at the 
beginning of life." Our cotemporary ('nils to 
define what constitutes "careful training." 
What one individual considers careful train- 
ing another rejects. Up to the present man's 
worst enemy is man, and it his spirit of greed 
and hate which is keeping us from coming 
together, thereby filling our prisons and re- 
formatories. 



We acknowledge receiving a copy of the 
Contra Costa Promotion and Panama-Pacific 
Exposition Number of the Contra Costa 
Gazette, dated Martinez, Cal., Aug. 10, 1912, 
consisting of 48 pages, with a handsomely 
designed front cover. It is got up in maga- 
zine form and is printed on an extra grade of 
news. Its appearance, typographically, speaks 



At a meeting of the Board of Fire Commis- 
sioners, held Friday, Aug. 9, preliminary to 
the reading of the proposed amendment to the 
charter to establish a Two-Platoon System in 
the San Francisco Fire Department, Alexan- 
der George, as chairman of a committee of 
three members from the Firemen's Amend- 
ment Convention, addressed the Board as 
follows: 

Mr. President and Gentlemen: — Mr. Wede- 
meyer, Mr. O'Donnell and myself have been 
named by the Firemen's Amendment Asso- 
ciation as a committee for the purpose of 
submitting to you a proposed charter amend- 
ment providing for the two-platoon system in 
the fire department. In appearing before 
you, I desire to say, not as an apology, for I 
have nothing to apologize for in this matter, 
but merely as an explanation, that the idea of 
inaugurating a two-platoon system in this de- 
partment did not originate with me, but when 
the members of the fire department unani- 
mously requested me to join them in this 
movement I felt it my duty to assist them to 
accomplish their purpose. 

As I am personally known to you all. and 
as each one of you is aware of my lifelong 
devotion to the welfare of the fire depart- 
ment, I think it is almost needless for me to 
state that I would not advocate this proposal 
if I believed that the efficiency of the depart- 
ment would be impaired therrby. But, gen- 
tlemen, on the contrary, I ni"st emphatically 
maintain that the proposed change will great- 
ly promote efficiency by providing an ade- 
quate force at all times, instead of a force 
which now is freqently inadequate. While 
nominally the strength of each company is 
eleven men, there are rarely more than seven 
men on duty, and of these, at certain times of 
the day, onlv four are in quarters ready to 
respond to an alarm of fire, whereas under 
the new system there will always be seven. 
If you will permit me, I will read the pro- 
posed amendment* as it will take but a few 
moments. 

In conclusion I desire to state that, as we 
intend to place the amendment on the hallot 
by petition, it is not our purpose to ask the 
Board of Supervisors to father it, although 
individual supervisors have expressed them- 
selves favorably. For the same reason we 
do not ask you to take any official action 
thereon; we have come to you merely as a 
matter of courtesy and we desire to state 
that whatever suggestions you may offer, 
either now or at any time during the coming 
week, will be given the most careful consid- 
eration by our executive committee. 

Note. — Amendment appeared in last week's issue as 
part of Fire Commissioners' proceedings. 



Around the Bay Cities. 

[Special Correspondence.] 

The uniform of the Alameda Fire Depart- 
men has been changed from olive drab to 
blue. The reason for the change is that the 
olive drab cloth is no longer manufactured, 
and that the blue is a more serviceable uni- 
form. The men will not be compelled to 
adopt the new uniform at the present time, 
but all must have them by January 1st. The 
change is agreeable to both the men and 
Chief Steinmetz. 

Captain Reichsrath of the Webster street 
company has been chosen to fill the position 
of second assistant chief. Reichsrath aver- 
aged 77 per cent and won out over Captain 
Kelly, whose per centage was 75, on credits 
for time in the service. Reichsrath has been 
in the department for twelve years. The pa- 
sition pays a salary of $100 a month, with 
prospects of an early increase. 

The lieutenants taking the examination for 
captain failed to pass, and the vacancy will 
be filled by appointment temporarily. G. 
Geantit was appointed driver of chemical 1; 
I. C. Harper of truck 1 was granted 13 days' 
leave of absence. 

The residents of Fruitvale District No. \ 
have petitioned the Oakland Council for more 
hydrants. The matter has been referred to 
Commissioner Turner. 

The San Leandro Trustees are going ahead 
in earnest to purchase up-to date apparatus 
for the department. Chief Eber's letter, 
signed by members of the department, threat- 
ening to quit unless new apparatus was im- 
mediately purchased, did the work. At the 
last meeting, after earnest debate, Trustee 
Coleman was appointed to secure a price on a 
forty horse power chassis, to be equipped to 
suit, the price to be submitted at the next 
meeting. 

It is proposed to change the horse-drawn 
combination chemical and hose wagon at fire 
station 2 of the Berkeley department at Du- 
rant avenue by adding a 4-cylinder 50 horse 
power Knox chassis. The change will in- 
crease the carrying capacity of the wagon 
from 700 to 1U00 feet of 2Jinch hose. 

Fire broke out in the stable of the Mer- 
chants' Drayage and Express Company Thurs- 
day night, Aug. 8, and caused a loss esti- 
mated at $60,000; fifteen horses were burned 
to death, and six cottages were damaged. A 
good deal of complaint has been made against 
I the slowness of the department in getting to 
the fire after the alarm was sounded; while 
we will agree with Chief Ball that the alarm 
should have been turned in sooner, and that 
the fire had gained good headway before the 
department arrived, yet it is common talk 
among insurance men and property owners 
that some of the Oakland companies are ex- 
ceedingly slow in getting to a fire. 

Eddie Healy, in speaking about the long 
hours of ihe firemen reminds him of the story 
of the little boy whose father was on duty in 
a house where he couldn't, get home to his 
meals and consequently only came home once 
in five days. One day on returning from a 
fire he saw his youngster fighting. He 
jumped off the hose wagon, licked his bov 
and jumped back on again. The boy went 
home crying and his mother said, "Who hit 
you?" "The man who sleeps here once a 
week," said the boy. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



San Francisco Fire Commissioners 



The Board of Fire Commissioners met in 
regular session' Friday, August 16 (all mem- 
bers present) and transacted the following 
business: 

Report of the Administrative Committee on 
communications with recommendations: 

Civil Service Commission, in regard to the 
appointment of temporary firemen other than 
civil service eligibles regularly certified. Re- 
ferred to Board of Fire\'Cpmmissioners and 
Civil Service Commissioners- in joint session. 
Civil Service Commission, in regard to error 
in deposition of Engineer Jas. Lowe as to age- 
qualification. Recommend corrected copy of 
testimony be sent to the Civil Service Com- 
mission. 

From the Civil Service Commission, in re- 
gard to request of this Board for twelve fire- 
men for temporary appointment. Filed. 

From the-Civil Service Commission, in re- 
«rars to the appointment of first and second 
assistant chief engineers, calling attention to 
rule of' Civil Service Commission and stating 
that said appointment had not been approved. 
Filed. ' 

From the Department Veterinarian, sub- 
mitting report for month of July, 1911. Filed. 
From Acting Battalion Chief W hi taker, re- 
porting an accident to the son of Dr. Blum of 
.2070 Jackson street. 'Filed, 

From Jas. Walsh, hoseman engine 12, mak- 
ing application for leave of absence, with pay, 
for thirty days, beginning August 8, 1912. 
Granted. 

From the secretary of the Socialist Party 
of San' Francisco, advising that they are sup- 
porting the firemen in. trying to obtain a' 
shorter work day in the [department. Filed. 
From the Superintend^ of Engines, te- 
"ferring to vacation rule a'ffetting the Super- 
intendent of Engines and firs assistant, and 
recommending that same Be' rescinded. Re- 
• ferred to chief engineer with, full power. 

From Attorneys Barrett and Thomas, re- 
claim against A. C. Butt oPthis department 
hy Walter E. Janke for $rf(0.18. Referred to 
Captain Davis, to be included' in the list for 
payment.. 

From Charles M. White, truckman truck 11, 
tendering his resignation 86." d" member of this 
department, to take effect from and after 
August 8, 1912. Accepted. 

From Chas. Murray, battalion chief district 
No. 11, reporting the suspension of Thomas 
Connors, hoseman engine 33 on AugU9l D for 
intoxication and disorderly conduct while on 
doty. Recommend chief engineer prepare 
charges and set trial for Tuesday, August 20. 
From the Superintendent of Engines, sub- 
uniting complaint against Fireman J. Sisk of 
pumping station No. I, for insolent language 
to a superior and recommending that he be 
.i, iiplmed. Referred to chief engineer with 
powf to act. 

■Fnnii the ijuperintepdenj of Engines, re- 
porting on men off doty at the corporation 
yard.-oo' including vacations and regular time 
off. for July. 1912. Filed. 

Prom Supervisor Andrew J. Gallagher, re- 
questing information as UK the number ol 



employes in this departme^fwho are required 
to work seven days a week without a day off, 
the necessity for this reOoirement and the 
approximate expense to provide a day off, one 
in seven for all employes in, the department. 
Referred to the chief engineer. 

From the chief engineer reporting fhe re- 
assignment of Truckman R. S. Sheehan, from 
truck 12't.o truck 1. Approved. 

From the Superintendent of Engines, re- 
porting an accident to Chas. H. Derham, first 
assistant chief engineer pumping station No. 
l', who fell from a street car on August 3 and 
fractured, his arm. Filed.. 

From Alfred Girot, hoseman relief engine 2 
(machinist corporation yard) making appli- 
cation for leave of absence for one month, 
with pay, from August 5, 1912, on account of 
sickness. Approved. 

From W. B. Everson, captain engine 1, 
making application for 30 days' leave of ab- 
sence, with pay, and permission to leave the 
city, on account of sickness, commencing 
August 9, 1912. Approved. 

From the chief engineer, reporting the 
transfer tor cause of Truckman Frank Lot- 
tritz, from truck 1 to fireboat 1. 
UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 
Communication from thfe ; . department sur- 
geon, reporting on the condition of Captain 
Fay, stating that in his opinion the condition 
of Captain Fay's eyes will not permit him to 
do fire duty Ordered to ; »vf>ear -before Ad- 
ministrative Committee. . . 
' NEW BUSINESS.' 
Resolution appointing Harry J. Ready pro- 
bationary member of the;S*n, Francisco Vire 
Department. Adopted. ,\^i 

Requisition on the CivilServicfiCJmmission 
for one captain, one lieutenant, one driver, 
one hoseman and two truckman for appoint- 
ment in this, department. Ordered sent. 

Bids for oneor more dmilrS'W) gallon motor- 
driven chemical engines "Were received as 
follows: 

WEBB iCO. 

Four cylinder $ 6.750.00 

Six cylinder', „, j, 7.350.00 

AMERICAN I.A FRANCE. 



Four cylinder , $ 8,088.00 

Six cylinder ..' 8.604.00 

CONSOLIDATED MOTOR CAB CO. 

Four cylinder $ 5,950.00 

without extras. 

WHITE CO 

Six cylinder $ 9,183.70 

Bids for one or more combi laiior chemical 

and ho e « agons were n i i ived as Follows: 

WHITE CO. 

Shaft driven 4 9.183.70 

Chain driven . 10,601 60 

CONSOLIDATED MOTOR I IB I 

Pour cylinder S 5,60 

without i x 1 1 ■ 
AMERICAN l.A PRANCE I 

Four cylinder * t 

Six cylinder 8,361.20 

NOTT FIRE ENGINE I 

Four cylinder * 8,116 SO 

WEBB c<> 

Pour cylinder * 6,61 

with si lid Hi' 



Four cylinder 6,700.00 

with 'pjunctuf eleas tires 

Bids for fire hose were received as follows: 
5,000 feet of 3j{-ihch, 20,000 feet of 2| inch, 
7,500 feet of lj-inch. 

' l't ' 2| i H 

Bowers Rubber Co ,$3,525 $17,400 $6,700 

Amer. Rubber Mfg. Co ;:. 3,525 17,950 5,950 
Manhatten Rubber Co.. .'. 5,250 21.000 
Bilateral Rubber Co..,.:.. 4,875 19,400 6,500 

A number of hose manufacturers sent in 
communicntionsobjecting to the specifications 
and declined to bid. Mr. Wellington, repre- 
senting the Down Town Committee of the 
Chamber of Commerce, stated that about fif- 
teen dealers in fire hose declined to bid be- 
cause the specifications differed so much from 
the standard hose that it would not pay for 
them to comply and excluded competition. 
President Brarirfenstein ordered a meeting of 
the Board at 7:30 next Monday morning to 
hear the objections of the manufacturers. 
The awarding of contracts was laid over. 

Plans for the new quarters of engine 24 
were approved. 

Personal Mention. 

Hosemrn Shea of engine 28 will spend his 
vacation at Napa Springs. 

Ed. Murphy, a member of engine 26, Was 
operated for appendicitis recently. 

Hoseman Andrew Keefe of engine 1 has 
gone to El Verano for a 17 day vacation. 

Since Captain Hartman of wafer tower 2 
returned from his vacation the neighbors 
around Seventh street feel that they can 
breathe easy now. 

Battalion Chief Resell is no* holding forth 
at the quarters of engine 26, looking as ro- 
bust and healthy as usual. 

Frank Cunningham of truck 1 says he is 
going to. get married by telephone, providing 
the line isn't being held by another couple 
getting a divorce. 

Hoseman Schneider of engine 28 has just 
come back from Salinas, where he attended 
the Rodeo Carnival. He says U was the most 
exciting event he ever witnessed. 

At the recent 'Queen Carnival and Baby 
Show of the Benicla Tribe, held at Ked.neii's 
Hall, Win. Coiefc t«n> were awarded two 
beautifully engraved silver spoons. 



Fire Chief Carole of Vancouver. B. C, in 
a letter t.. Captatii Ellenul ru of truck I, say a 
he will arrive in San Francisco Sept. 6, on 
l,,s way to attend the Pacific Coasl Fire 
Chiefs' Convention al Lo Vi geles. No doubi 
i ni.-i Carlisle will pui in h riaj ur two inspect- 
ing the departments motor a|H arati 
high' presulre sjrfcTtwn ahdjonr methods ol 
ing with i'n ' 



.TclnC IK I * - i '^55 

U. J. BDRCK, '"' 'AiLOR 

MAM -.i A SPECIAI n Ol 

FIRBMEIN'S'.' UIV1I OUW1JS 

ALSO FINE Clv'lLl IA SUITS 
93 EDDY STREET San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



The Present. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening. Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION IS53 

To REACH Nurseries, take Castro street car to 23rd, or 

Mission. 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



p, ( Douslai 4934 
™ on "i Home C 2842 



Phone 



I We.1 . 586 
I HomeS 3174 



Serveau Bros. 

FLORISTS 



128 POST ST. 21 10-21 14 FILLMORE ST. 



WM. F. EGAN 

M. R. C. V. S. 

..VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D... 



1155 GOLDEN GATE AYE. 
Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 



Telephone 
Home C 2456 



Lamanet Bros. 

Ii the place of all places to get the very latest and belt in the way of 

Firemen's Regulation Shirts, 
Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

Hats and Underwear, Etc. 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Douglas 3825 



Phone Home C 2996 



MALERBI RESTAURANT 

MALERBI & FRUCOL1. Prop.. 
....First Class Wines, Liquors and Cigars.... 

Regular Week Day Med*. Noon 35 eenu. Evening 25 cenli 
Sunday Meali 50 cent, up 

546 Front St. near Jackson San Francisco 



The past is gone beyond recall, 

Far in advance the future lies, 
We have the present; that is all, 

So let us grasp it e'er it flies, 
Enjoy it as we go along 

And crowd it with the things that 
pay, 
Mix in a share of mirth and song 

And make the most of each today. 

We can but dwell upon the past, 

And of the future we can dream, 
But to the present, hard and fast, 

We can apply our pounds of steam 
And make it count as down the line 

It passes, leaving naught behind 
Save records that for years will shine 

Or be a millstone on the mind. 

If there is anything in life 

Worth living it is now and here, 
So let us mingle in the strife 

And make of each a banner year. 
No use to think how things would hum 

Could we live yesterday once more 
Or plan for days that are to come, 

A brilliant and enchanted score. 

This hour, this moment, is the one 

In which we live and move and think, 
Admire the rainbow or the sun, 

Enjoy the things we eat and drink. 
So fill it up, and fill it high. 

With word and smile and play and 
act, 
We live it once in passing by, 

So let us live it for a fact. 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 

Six hundred thousand Americans go abroad 
every year. 

Once the American tourist preferred a foreign 
watch. Now he goes to Europe with a Howard 
bought here — or comes back with a Howard 
bought there. 

He lias an example in the ship's officer on 
the dock, who orders up the gang plank on 
Howard time. 

Yon And more and more of the responsible 
men carrying Howard Watches. 

The great railroads start, rl It. The time In- 
spectors of ISO American railroads have officially 
certified and adopted the Howard. 

It is carried by leading technical men — by the 
heads of great industrial and commercial en- 
terprises— -by scientists— bv army and navy 
officers and government officials. 

Manv a man buys a Howard for the Sheer 
pleasure of owning the watch that is so well 
spoken of by mm whose opinion be respects. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pay for it. 

The price of each watch is fixed at the fac- 
tory and a printed ticket attached— from the 
1 7- jewel i double roller! In a Crescent Extra or 
Boss Extra gold-filled ease at $40. to the 23- 
lewel at $150— and the Edward Howard model 
at $350. 

Admiral Slgfibee bos written a little boo*, 
'•The Log Of the Howard Watch." giving the- 
record of his own Howard In the L T . S. Navyr 
STouMl enjoy it. Drop us a post-card. Dept. N. 
.ii ii l we'll send you a copy. 
HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston. Mass 

T. H. K1LGO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 

71 WALLLR ST.. S AN FRANCISCO 

ROSENBERG -GABERT CO. 

INCORPORATED 

(£iuU anb JHtlitaru, Sailnrs 

73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 

Prejenl ihi. Add sad receive $2.' : oVeouol on all Caah Order, for 
Civilian Clothes 



Phone Merrill 4447 



H. G. WILLIAMS 



Aejent Northern California for the 



Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 



1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



Thirty fire companies in Connecti- 
cut and New York have accepted in- 
vitations to attend the big paiade that 
the Danbury, Conn., fire department 
is arranging for September 12. 



THE 

PACIFICFIREMAN 
JOB DEPARTMENT 

IS NOW PREPARED TO PRINT 
LETTER HEADS 
BILL HEADS 
STATEMENTS 
ENVELOPES 
BUSINESS CARDS 
WEDDING INVITATIONS 
SHIPPING TAGS 
BILLS OF FARE. ETC 
479 TURK STREET 
Phone FRANKLIN 6867 



Home phone S 2517 

The Little Emporium 

L. RIZNIC Propnetor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 
2296-98 GEARY STREET 

Near Broderkk 



Telephone We.l 4824 



SAN FRANCISCO 



! Telephone Dousla. 2871 



Home C 4992 



WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WARRANT BROKERS 



630 KEARNY STREET 

COR COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Home J 2549 

EMIL SCHOENBEIN 

Fireman Cap Maker 

Formerly ol 2 1 si and Folsom 
. WILLIAMS.-. BUILDING 

THIRD STREET 

Cor. Mission. Room 307 SAN FRA NCISCO 

THE TRIPP REMEDY CO. 

POSITIVELY CURES 
Blood Poison, Chronic Catarrh, Rheumatism. 
Goitre. Tumorous Growths, Malaria, Erysipelas, 
Scrofula. Lupus, Tuberbular-Glands, Joints and 
all Blood Diseases 

479 TURK STREET SAN FRANCISCO 




VOL. IX. -NO. 34 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, AUGUST 24, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Stole Fire Horses and Supplies. 

A Philadelphia press dispatch, dated 
August 17, says: Michael Bendon, 
assistant superintendent of the city 
van stables, was arraigned in the 
police court charged with stealing fire 
horses, departmental supplies and 
other property of the municipality 
valued at thousands of dollars. Other 
officials of the city are implicated, it 
is charged by Director Porter. 

Amusing among the details disclosed 
is the story of how the city detectives 
found the missing fire horses. 

It appears that Bendon couducted 
at Lenda, N. J., a farm which he is 
charged with having stocked with the 
proceeds of his alleged thefts. Plain 
clothes men got on his trail and went 
to Mount Holly. 

An alarm of fire sounded and the 
detectives saw a fine team attached to 
a hay wagon following the suburban 
fire apparatus as diligently as though 
they were responding to the alarm 
themselves. They traced the wagon 
and found the city's missing fire 
horses. 



A Sparrow Fires Three Houses. 

At Lawrenceburg, Ind.. Saturday, 
August 17, an English .sparrow was 
the cause of three houses catching 
fire and had it not been for the prompt 
work of neighbors all would have been 
desl royed. 

The sparrow was building a nest 
under the eaves of the house of Mrs. 
Mary Webber when it picked up a 
long cotton string from a pile of rub- 
bish that had just been burned. 

With the burning string the sparrow 
flew to the roof of Mrs. Sophia Schaf 



fer's house, then to Otto McCreigh- 
ton's house and then to the roof of 
Manuel Woest's home, where it dropp- 
ed the string. 

A fire started in the shingles of each 
building. 

Petaluma. 



At a meeting of the Fire Commis- 
sioners of Petaluma, Wednesday, Aug. 
14, applications were received for the 
position of driver of the new chemical 
auto fire engine. Three applications 
were received, Floyd Drake offering 
to do the work for $75 per month; T. 
V. Peters for $85 and Walter Guldner 
for $88 per month. The applications 
were taken under advisement until 
the next meeting and a committee 
was named to prepare a list of the 
duties of the driver so that when they 
know what will be expected of them 
some of the applicants may drop out. 

The Board with the Mayor discussed 
the placeof keepingof the new engine 
and all present favored the construc- 
tion of a brick building adjoining the 
corporation yard, which on account of 
the present walls can be built at a 
small cost. If this is done, the hose 
wagon could be left in its present 
quarters. Nothing definite was done 
about the matter. 

Commissioner A. S. Newburg intro- 
duced the two following resolutions, 
which were unanimously adopt< <1 by 
the Board. Be it 

Resolved, That the interests of the 
city of Petaluma would lie best served, 
and greater beneficial results obtained 
for the future good of the lire depart- 
ment from an education standpoint, if 
the Council of the city of Petaluma 



would direct the chief engineer of the 
fire department to attend the National 
Convention in Denver instead of Los 
Angeles. Be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of this reso- 
lution be filed with the Council of the 
city of Petaluma by the secretary of 
this commission with the recommenda- 
tion that the said Council rescind its 
former order requesting the chief en- 
gineer to attend the Los Angeles con- 
vention, and adopt a new resolution 
directing him to attend the conven- 
tion to be held at Denver, and that 
the expense of said trip be paid from 
the municipal treasury. — Couiier. 

Seattle. 



A Seattle paper says the Board of 
Public Works of Seattle has purchased 
a site in the Fauntleroy Park district. 
West Seattle, for a concrete standpipe 
to be built during the coming fall. 
The pipe will be a gigantic affair, 
costing nearly $75,000, and is design- 
ed to supply a large part of the great 
West Seattle residence district. Its 
completion will afford this rapidly 
I growing portion of the city better fire 
protection than it has enjoyed in the 
past. 

Want $10,000 Appropriation. 

Members of the Veteran Volunteer 
Firemen's Association have petitioned 
the supervisors that the animal an- 
nual appropriation le increased from 
$5,000 to $10,000 a year. This will 
permit of men ased monthly pensions, 
a death benefit of $100 and the em- 
ployment of a secretary at $180 a year, 
[t is also suggested thai the mtnage- 
ment of the affairs of the association 
be vested in a board of tour trustees 
to be appointed by the mayor. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



The Two-Platoon Agitation. 

Under the above caption, the Fire- 
man's Herald of July 27, editorially 
comments: 

Once more we invite fire commis- 
sioners and the uninformed heads of 
fire departments to give the two- 
platoon question more candid consid- 
eration than they have done in the 
past. Kansas City, Mo., has put the 
double-shift arrangement into full ef- 
fect. Determined efforts to bring 
about the change are afoot in Seattle, 
San Francisco, and Kansas City, Kan. 
Next year pressure is to be brought 
to bear on the Ohio state legislature 
to pass an act making the change com- 
pulsory, and we suspect that similar 
action will be taken in the state of 
New York. 

The truth is that the agitation for 
two-platoons in fire departments will 
not down until that system is proven 
prejudicial to the efficiency of fire de- 
partments. Omaha has had the sys- 
tem for five years and has not gone to 
rack and ruin as a consequence. If 
the other cities mentioned adopt the 
two-shift plan there can be no doubt 
that the agitation will sweep the 
country. 

Fireman Tries to Commit Suicide. 



The Underwriters' Report of this 
city, under date of Aug. 15, says: 

Wm. O'Neil, who was discharged 
from the Butte Fire Department by 
Chief Sanger, brooded over his actions 
and became so morose that he endeav- 
ored to take his life last Wednesday 
morning by cutting his throat from 
ear to ear. The city physician was 
called, and after considerable diffi- 
culty, sewed the severed flesh togeth- 
er, and stated that O'Neil would live 
unless unexpected complications set 
in. The physician believes the man 
was temporarily insane, which caused 
him to commit the rash act. He nearly 
carried his plans into execution, as 
his throat was cut in a horrible man- 
ner, a portion of the Adam's app e 
being severed. O'Neil was the per- 
son referred to in this column last 
week as having been dsicharged for 
trying to steal five pairs of shoes dur- 
ing the fire which destroyed the Mac- 
Donald shoe store. He was appointed 
to the fire department early this year 
and was serving a probation term, 
which was almost completed. 



Why They Go Mad. 

The late Harry Macdona, one of 
Peary's crew in his last voyage to the 
North pole, speaking of the constant 
association with the crew, had this 
to say: 

"I didn't mind the cold so much, 
and the hardships were to be looked 
for, as a part of the game. But what 
proved to be almost insupportable was 
the constant association, day and 
night, with the same men. They 
were all good fallows, too, and I liked 
them, but I got to know them too 
well. A man is like a music box. He 
can only play just so many tunes and 
after you have heard them all over, 
again and again, you get deadly tired 
of them. I think that is why so many 
go mad." 

Seattle Wants Two-Platoon. 



An ordinance introduced in the 
Seattle Council, if passed, will divide 
the employes of the fire department 
into the two-platoon system, with the 
day force working from 8 a. m. to 6 
p. m. each day, and the night force 
from 6 p. m. to 8 a. m., providi ng that | 
every member of the department is 
subject to emergency call. The meas- 
ure fellows the filing recentl t of a pe- 
tition signed by several thousand tax- 
payers asking that this change be 
made instead of having the employes 
on duty twenty-four hours, w th cer- 
tain provisions for days off duly. The 
measure also provides for a minimum 
wage scale to certain members of the 
department. It was referred to the 
Public Safety Committee. 

Portland, Ore. 

It is said that Portland has decided 
to postpone the purchasing of the pro- 
posed $60,000 automobile fire appara- 
tus until after the Fire Chief's Con- 
vention, which will be held at Denver 
next month. Chief Dowell and two 
of his associates will attend the meet- 
ing. The purpose of this delay is to 
allow Chief Dowell and his associates 
to investigate other apparatus, now in 
use in other cities. — Ex. 



Walla, Walla, Wash. 

Owing to the many fire alarms 
which have been turned in at Walla 
Walla lately, but one fire of any im- 
portance has occurred, this being a 
dwelling which was completely gutted. 
The efficiency of the fire department 
since the extra crew was added has 
been noteworthy, and though an aver- 
age of three alarms a day for the past 
month have been reported, but one 
serious blaze has taken place. Fire 
Chief Metz is proving to the city com- 
missioners that his demands for more 
men were not unreasonable. 

Tacoma, Wash. 

The Municipal Commission of Taco- 
ma (Wash.), says the Underwriters' 
Report, has voted to send Fire Chief 
McAlevy to Los Angeles to attend the 
annual convention of the Pacific Coast 
Federation of Fire Chiefs in Septem- 
ber. Chief McAlevy was instructed 
to invite the federation to meet at 
Tacoma in 1913. It is believed that 
Tacoma w-ill get the convention, as it 
is held alternate years in the South 
and North, and Tacoma was mention- 
ed for the convention at the last meet- 
ing, held at Victoria. 

The Los Angeles Fire Commission 
has decided that one of the new auto 
fire engines soon to be purchased will 
be located at San Pedro for the pro- 
tection of the waterfront. The San 
Pedro district is also rejoicing over 
the prospect of better fire protection 
because of the announced plan of the 
water commission to purchase the 
local water plant and install a complete 
water system. 

Fire chief Kenney of the Berkeley 
i.'epartment, it is faid, is assisting 
Professor 0. M. Washburn of the 
University of California in i he protec- 
tion of the college students from oc- 
cupying boarding houses which afford 
inadequate fire protection. These in- 
stitutions will not recei'. e the sanction 
<>f the univers ty, and will not a] i ear 
on its lists. 



City Fireman.— We owe you a great 
deal for the pleasant time we've had 
on your farm. Farmer. — Sure, you 
owe it, and here's the bill. 



Subscribe for the Pacific Fireman 



An e^enange says: A Warren 
"Tnirty" has replaced the he r?e and 
buggy of Fire Lhief Wintemute of 
Fresno, supplying a long-felt want 
and increasing the efficiency of the de- 
railment. The car bought is the 
Warren racer, remodeled, which wen 
so many track and road events this 
past season. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Laurette Taylor's next venture at 
the Alcazar, commencing Monday 
night, will be as Eve Alverstone in 
"The Wooing of Eve," another new 
play by J. Hartley Manners, and she 
promises to be no less interesting in it 
than she was in either of her previous 
interpretations, although the role de- 
mands radically different treatment. 
Eve is young, but an accomplished 
woman of the world, sensible to mind 
and brilliant of speech, ever ready 
with the right action and the right 
word. Her whole tone and demeanor 
are bouyant, and their effect is that of 
a tonic in depressing surroundings. 
Withal she has suffered, and suffering 
has taught her the great lesson of 
charity— of instinct for another's sor- 
row. All the incidents of the comedy 
take place in the drawing-room of 
Rodd's house in London and the libra- 
ry of Lady Grafton's home at Edge- 
ware, assuring sumptuous staging. 
Miss Taylor's final week at the 
Alcazar opens Monday night after 
next with "Seven Sisters," a comedy 
from the Hungarian in which she 
scored one of her big successes on 
Broadway. 

Empress Theatre. 

The Empress Sunday afternoon will 
present the most astounding aquatic 
novelty in vaudeville— the Three Tra- 
villa Brothers and their Seal with the 
human brain. A playlet of heart in- 
terest will be presented by Arthur 
Sullivan and Charles Bartling, entitled 
"A Spotless Reputation." Another 
feature will be presented in the per- 
son of Miss Leona Guerney, the Sibe- 
rian songbird, with the double voice, 
who is making her initial American 
tour. Billy Rogers, a mimic, whis- 
tler and comedian will create a good 
deal of merriment with his pleasing 
specialty. The Sombreros. George 
and Bella, two jugglers, will send a 
sigh from the hearts of the feminine 
portion of the audience in "Fun in a 
Millinery Shop." LeoCurryand Fred 
Riley, two lively and magnetic young 
men, will introduce a pot-pourri of the 
late song hits, etc. Miss Olga Rich- 
ardson, a dainty and talented English 
comedienne, will offer some delightful 
songs from the other side of the briny. 
The Elliott Trio of wirists will nego- 
tiate some difficult and graceful feats 
on the tight wire. 



SEAGRAVE AERIAL 
MOTOR -DRIVEN HOOK AND LADDER TRUCK 




In service at Vancouver, B. C, Boise, Idaho, San Diego and Los 

Angeles, California. 

Territory covered by the 
Gorham Fire Apparatus Company, Inc. 



SEATTLE 
82 & 84 W. Marion Street 



Seagrave Representatives for the Pacific Slope 

SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Street 



LOS ANGELES 
1223 S. Olive Street 



American Rubber Mfg, Co- 

9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories — Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 



WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 



Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose, Brass 
Goods, Valves and. AH Fire Department Supplies 



When You're Buyin 9 Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

L_. H. &. B. I. BILL 

Solo Distributors for the Pacific Coast S43 tlolden (iate Ave., San Francisco 





PACIFIC F I R E M A N 




PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 

BY 

JAS. K. MACK Eriitor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 

be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manager 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance $2.00 

Six months 1.00 

ADVERTISEMENTS 

Inserted on the most favorable terms, especially large and 
continuous ones. 

Editorial Rooms and Business Office, 479 Turk Street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 

Entered as second-class matter March 21. 1908. at the 
PnsLollico at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 3 . 1879. 

SATURDAY AUGUS f 24. 1912 



At a special meeting; of the Fire Commis- 
sion, held Tuesday morning, Thos. Connors of 
engine 33 was suspended for six months and 
transferred, for disorderly conduct and in- 
toxication. 

At Los Angeles, August 21, four hundred 
horses and sheep were burned to death, build- 
ings and dressed meats valued at $400,000 de- 
stroyed and Fred Montgomery, an employe, 
severely injured in a fire that destroyed the 
plant of the Los Angeles Packing Company. 

Many good reasons can be cited why the 
firemen of this city should be granted better 
living conditions. Better living conditions 
will have a tendency to make the department 
more efficient, as has been proven wherever 
the two- platoon system, when properly man- 
aged, has been in force, and that in itself 
should convince the taxpayers. 

At a special meeting of the Fire Commis- 
sion Monday morning, the American Rubber 
Company was awarded the contract of fur- 
nishing the fire department 5000 feet of Si- 
inch hose. Owing to some irregularity in 
awarding the contract for furnishing the de- 
partment 7500 life-inch hose, the matter was 
laid over, pending an opinion from the city 
attorney. 



the Civil Service Commission on charges of, 
incompetency in the matter of plans and spe- 
cifications of the Twin Peaks reservoir is ; 
right to the point. The Mayor's action is 
based on the report of the engineers' com- 
mission which investigated the faulty con- 
struction of the reservoir, in which they 
state, in their official test, that the reservoir 
has been leaking at the rate of 100,000 gal- 
Ions per day. 

In reply to the Mayor's letter Mr. Connick 
says he has investigated the manner in which i 
the joints of the reservoir have been con- 
structed and found that they differ materially 
from the ones called for in the original plans 
and specifications which were prepared while 
he was in the employ of the city. The joints, 
he asserts, were not constructed in accor- 
dance with his ideas. 

In justice to Engineer Connick. who has 
served the city faithfully for many years, he 
should be given a fair and impartial hearing, 
and if it can be shown that the plans and 
specifications have been materially changed 
from the original designs, he should be ac- 
quitted and the faulty construction of the 
reservoir placed where it rightfully belongs. 

Appointments Only for Six Days. 

At a meeting of the Civil Service Commis- 
sion last Monday night it was decided that 
temporary appointees in the fire department 
be appointed for one week only. 

The Fire Commission some time ago ap- 
pointed, without regard to the rule, a number 
of men to the temporary Ust without consult- 
ing the Civil Service Commission. 

Monday night's action of the Civil Service 
Commission will cut down the salaries of those 
twelve or fifteen men who were recently ap- 
pointed, many of whom have been working 
for three weeks to a week of six days. 

San Bruno Road Blaze. 



Here is the way a North Dakota editoradds 
to the joy of life: "It is reported that one of 
the fastidious married ladies of this town 
kneads bread with her gloves on. This inci- 
dent may be somewhat peculiar— but there 
are others! The editor of this paper needs 
bread with his shoes on; he needs bread with 
hi.-, shirt on; he needs bread with his pants on; 
and unless some of the delinquent subscribers 
to this "Old Rag of Freedom" pony up before 
long he will need bread without a darn thing 
on, and North Dakota is no Garden of Eden 
in the winter time either." 



Bitten by Rabbid Fire Horse. 

About three weeks ago the horse driven by 
Battalion Chief Murray went off his feed and 
was sent to the hospital, where Dr. Egan ad- 
ministered treatment for indigestion. While 
examining the horse tht doctor received a 
nip in the fleshy partof the hand which broke 
the skin. Sticking it back with saliva and 
treating it with Lysol was all the attention 
paid to the wound at the time. The next day 
Pat O'Conneil was working in the stall with 
the horse and was bit on the finger. 

It was noticed that the horse showed an 
aversion to water and at times lost control of 
his hind legs. Chloroform was administered 
by means of a sponge on a stick, which the 
horse snapped at and chewed up and finally 
died. The head was cut off and sent to the 
Board of Health, and after being examined by 
the surgeons of that department, the report 
came back that the horse had "rabbies." 

Pat immediately took a complete course of 
Pastuer treatment, twenty-four injections, 
and the doctor is nearly through with the 
same. This is usually successful in prevent- 
ing the disease, but some consoling friends 
have informed the patients that three cases 
are known of where death resulted in ten 
days after the treatment was completed. 
Now Pat and the doctor are awaiting devel- 
opments. 

Pacific Coast Fire Chiefs' Convention. 



The Twin Peaks Reservoir. 



Mayor Rolph, in his letter to the Board of 
Public Works last Monday, asking for the re- 
vocation of the leave of absence of Harris D. 
H. Connick, formerly chief assistant ci y engi- 
neer, and suggesting that he be tried before 



In a fire which broke out early lastTuesday 
morning in an untenanted building, known as 
the Red Mill, just across the line in San Mateo 
county, on the San Bruno road, one man lost 
his life, another was almost suffocated and 
two road houses were totally destroyed. A 
man named Neubert, a laborer who slept in 
the Red Mill, lost his life; his remains were 
found after the flames had been extinguished. 

For a time the lives of fourteen men in the 
WVIch place were in jeopardy, so rapidly did 
the flames spread from the Red Mill. When 
the firemen from engine 11 arrived, several 
lodgers had already been cut off from egress 
by the smoke and flames and were rescued 
with difficulty. One man wascarried out un- 
conscious by a hoseman, Leo Mitchell. 

The fact that the only fire apparatus, en- 
gine 11, had to come from Railroad avenue 
and Fifteenth street, three miles away, and 
that the only hydrant was 2500 feet distant, 
making it necessary to run a relay of hose, 
the fire had made great headway before the 
first stream of water was thrown. 

The fire is supposed to have originated from 
a lighted cigarette thrown on the tinder dry 
floor of the Red Mill by Neubert before fall- 
ing asleep. 



[Special Correspondence.! 

Now that both preliminaries and program 
of the twentieth annual convention of the 
Pacific Coast Association of Fire Chiefs are 
practically settled, the important thing to re- 
member is reservation. The national annual 
meeting of the Grand Army is to be held in 
Los Angeles during the week of Sept. 9-14, 
the same as our convention, and the chiefs 
who do not reserve their berths and hotel ac- 
commodations a week or ten days in advance 
may be sadly disappointed. 

No matter what priced hotel room is wanted, 
advantage should be taken of the offer of 
Chief Archie J. Eley to reserve it. Whether 
going to Los Angeles by boat or train you can 
not secure berths, etc.. too early. 

Certainly no loyal Pacific Coast chief will 
go to any other fire convention during the 
coming fall without attending that of his own 
organization at Los Angeles. It is to be 
hoped that all those who can will be at both 
Los Angeles and Denver, and even from the 
North Pacific coast points the cost of a round 
trip ticket, including boLh Denver and Los 
Angeles, is only about $22.00 more than one 
to and from Los Angeles alone. But our first 
duty is to our home enterprise and to our 
popular host. Chief Eley of Los Angeles. 

Unless the upper coast arrangements be 
changed, the northern chiefs will gather in 
Seattle and leave there on the "President" 
steamship at 10 a. m. of Friday, Sept. 6, ar- 
riving in San Francisco the following Sunday 
noon. They will leave that city by rail so as 
to be in time for the opening of the conven- 
tion in Los Angeles Monday morning. Those 
who will take this magnificent trip must send 
in their names early to the undersigned. 

Harry W. Bringhurst, Secretary. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



San Francisco Fire Commissioners 

The Board of Fire Commissioners met in 
regular session Friday, August 23 (Commis- 
sioner Donohoe absent) and transacted the 
following business: 

Report of the Administrative Committee on 
communications with recommendations: 

From Mr. Chapman, President American- 
La France Fire Engine Company, regarding 
demonstration he desires to give of motor ap- 
paratus. Recommend be filed. 

From Battalion Chief Radford, reporting 
accident to truck 8 on Aug. 13. Filed. 

From the chief of police, requesting that 
Captain D-. R. Sewell of this department be 
allowed to attend to the photographic work of 
the police department during the absence of 
Police Photographer Geo. W. Blum, on vaca- 
tion. Granted. 

From Battalion Chief Jas Radford, sub- 
milting complaint by Lieut. Spellman of en- 
gine 10 against D. Burke, driver same com- 
pany, for disobeying orders. Your Commit- 
tee respectfully reports that it has investi- 
gated this matter and is not satisfied that 
there was any intentional violation of the 
rules on the part of Mr. Burke, and we re- 
commend lhat no action be taken in the 
matter. 

From the Superintendent of Engines, re- 
porting the cost of repairs at the corporation 
yard for the high pressure system for the 
month of July as $69.11. Filed. 

From the Superintendent of Engines, re- 
porting cost of repairs at corporation \-urd 
for pumping station No. 1 for the month of 
July as $26.02. Filed, 

From John Leahy, captain truck 2, making 
application for extension of leave of absence 
for thirty days, with pay. from Aug. 18, on 
account of continued illness! Granted! 

From (.'. ('. Sullivan, hoseman engine 34, 
making application for salary during disabili- 
ty, caused l>v being burned while in the dis- 
charge of duty. Granted, 

From Michael F. Hannan, captain engine 
84, making application for salary during dis- 
ability, caused by being burned while in the 
discharge of duly. Approved. 

From John J. Toomey, ho>eman engine 2, 
making application for transfer from nose- 
man engine 2 to hoseman engine 6. Approved. 

From A. J. Hennessey, stoker engjin 6, 
making application for transfer from stoker 
engine 6 to hoseman engine 2. Approved. 

From Bat talion ( lini' ( look, reporl ing act i 
deni in the fire boats i in collision August 14, 
when the Sullivan drifted down on the Scan- 
nell, lying al her berth. Your Commit tee re- 
spec l lolly reports thai ii has ii vestigated the 
mutter, and finds that with Lhe exercise of 
more cure on the part of Pilot Olsen in charge 
of i.t»,- .Sulnvau ihU accident could have been 
avoided. While we do not think he was 
guilty ot any deliberate recklessness or care- 
les ne ■ . al t lie same i ime we do nol believe 
the aceidenl was absolutely unavoidable: We 
do no* recommend the inflection of any pen- 
all y for i fie offense We have taken upon 
ourselve i the right to criticise his actioi t ■ 
we believe that the matter does not call for 



any further action on the part of the Board. 

From the chief engineer, reporting the ap- 
pointment of John Bogan as temporary second 
assistant chief engineer high pressure pump- 
ing station, on Wednesday, Aug. 7, because 
of accident to First Assistant Chief Durham. 
Recommend for approval and that Civil Ser- 
vice Commission be so notified. 

From C. F. Ward, acting battalion chief, 
district 2, in regard to accident to chemical 3, 
caused by collision with automobile owned by 
H. V. Ramsdell of 207 Cherry street. Re- 
commend be referred to city attorney for col- 
lectiotv of damages. 

From Superintendent of Horses, reporting 
on accident to August Rapp, hostler, who 
was kicked by a horse and severely injured. 
Placed on Hie. 

Proposed ordinance submitted by the chief 
engineer, relating to fire drills in factories, 
workshops, public and private schools, etc. 
Approved. 

From the chief engineer, reporting the re- 
assignments of P. Hallisy, from engine 1 to 
truck 11; Harry J. Ready, from truck 11 to 
engine 1. Approved. 

The following matters were referred to the 
Board by the Administrative Committee with- 
out, recommendation: 

From the Consolidated Motor Car Company 
supplementary to their bid on motor appara- 
tus received Augtfsl IB. Filed. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Matter of physical condition of Qapt, Fay, 
referred to the Administrative ( lommil tee al 
the lasi regular meelnVg of the Board nJr in- 
vestigation and report back to main body. 
Granted leave of absence to Ocl 1. 

Matter of awarding contracts for one or 
more double 80 gallcn motor-driven chemicj 
engines. Laid over. 

Matter of awarding contracts for one or 
more combination chemical and hose wagons. 
Laid over. new BVSll 

Re ommendation from the Administrative 
Committee that n con mui icatii n be address- 
ed to the Board of Supervisors to the effect 
thai all sign-boards hereafter to b< erected 
by the city bear upon their face a sign indi- 
cating Lhe nearest fire alarm box and the 
enactment of an ordinance. Adopted. 

Resolution requesting the Civil Service 
Commission' to certify eligible^ to Jill vacan- 
cies m this department during the month of 
September, 1912, Adoj ti d. 

Request for exunsion of time on contract 
to furnish mhnitor battery nozzles by M. 

Greenburg's .Sen.-. Thirty days req 

Gran: i d. 

Specifical ions for ; . nlii borage tanks 
and luhri. ..Mug oil tai ks to be im Lai « d at 
truck 4, and r< oiu ion inviting bide for same. 
\.|'>pi ed. 

Communication from the Superintendent of 
EWgines, reporting thai the Seagrave city 
ser\ ice hook and ladder tru< k mi el i all iiu 
r . quii emenU and rei 
tance. \p n ■ 

The follow ing tempo n rj • mploj ■■■ were 

ed; ' reo. D. Ha rpi r, path rmtia Iter; 

John 1 1 iran, horpesrcr; L. :■'. K- nnej 
gineei in ebo it, 'l \u I v. ii ■■ were a] 



pointed to fill the vacancies, subject to the 
approval of the Civil Service Commission: 
George Grantland, patternmaker; John Mc- 
Grath, horseshoer; Thomas Thompson, engi- 
neer fireloat. 



Around the Bay Cities. 

[Special Correspondence.] 

All bids for a combination ambulance and 
prtrol automobile were rejected by the Berke- 
ley Council, as none of the bids complied with 
the specifications. The Council will reartver- 
tise for bids. 

The Winehaven Company will give their an- 
nual ball October 5. This company is part of 
the Richmond Volunteer Fire Department. 

Representatives of the Gamewell Fire 
Alarm Company were in Richmond negotiat- 
ing with the Council for the establishment of 
a complete alarm system to cost $21,000. 

Chief Kenney of Berkeley is after the viola- 
tors of the fire escape ordinance. Several 
fraternity houses are violators of this ordi- 
nance, and it is the intention of the chief to 
see that it is enforced. 

John Dolan, a retired member of the Oak- 
land department and formerly with the Sixth 
street company, for a time forgot his old oc- 
cupi tion, and was discovered by. his tenant 
lauthing at a small blaze in the. kitchen of 
his residence, caused by the overturning of 
an oil lamp. Dolan showed signs of being 
under the influence of liquor, and when an 
: alarm was ordered turned in -Dolan is reported 
. to have said. "What';- the use? It's an old 
Slack' and it belongs to me— let 'er burn." 

Acting Engineer Steinmetz of the Alameda 
Fire Department is reported aw being a very 
sick man; an old injury of the back that he 
received at a fire some years ago i.s said to be 
the cause of his illness. Steinmetz has 
in the department for twelve years and is 
filling the position formerly occupied by John 
Malthais, who was retired on a pension. He 
is a brother of Chief Steinmetz, 

Fearing ejectment by his landlord, p. F, 

Olsen, gardener, aged 7b\ i~ believed to have 

sej tire to the house al 1135 Chester, street, 
Oakland, in which his charred body was found 
by fin men after the fire was extinguished 
early Wednesday morning. 

The individual who imagines he can run 
a tire paper and please everybody needs 
'•fixing. if such a person has ever iic 
ceedi d pass him along i his way that we may 
have a go< d Look al hia mortal n mains ere he 
vanishes away, fer surely this planet cat 
be bis* abiding-place Wedonoi wish to infer 
tm>1 an editor shouid go through the World 
trying to find beams to knock, disputing every 
person's opinion, fighting, elbowing and brow- 
beating all who ih\\> is from him. Other peo^ 
pie have their opinions and an editor rt 
nol fall into the emu- thai people will n 
him more foi ing wjth i hem on every 

i«>nic which they desire to discuss 

T«kp] ■ 1255 

U. J. ROPCtC, THE TAILOR 

MAKES \ 9t»l CIALTY OF 

FIREMEN'S '. " UNIFORMS 

ALSO n\i: i/17/./.i.v SUITS 
93 EDDY STREET San Fran. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boqueta always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering: plants in variety. 

Special attention given to Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening, Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Reach Nursehies, take Castro Btreet car to 23rd. or 

Mission, 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douglass and 24th streets. 



Phones j H ^ e " 2642 



Phone* 



IW«I . 586 
» Home S 3174 



Serveau Bros. 

FLORISTS 

128 POST ST. 2110-2114 FILLMORE ST. 



717 K Street 

Sacramento 



1 12 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 

EAGLESON & CO. 

Importer* and Manufacturer* 

MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS AND SHIRTS 
Navy Flannel Regulation Fire Shirts 

1118 MARKET ST., opp. Seventh 



The Old Tintype. 

He gazed on the oldtime picture — 

The tintype, faded and stained; 
And over his face crept shadows 

That showed how his heart was 
pained. 
'Twas only an oldtime picture 

Of him, in the bygone days, 
That loom now, ever so faintly 

Through memory's mellowing haze. 

He sighed o'er the old, old picture, 

Dented and scratched and dim; 
And smiled at the maiden, dimpled, 

Who sat by the side of him— 
The maiden, dimpled and happy, 

Who was pictured there, also; 
The maiden who held his fingers 

In the style of the long ago. 

'Twas only an oldtime picture, 

And taken in oldtime style- 
Each held the hand of the other. 

And each wore a tintype smile. 
He frowned at the oldtime picture, 

The tintype, scratched and de- 
pressed, 
"I wonder," he muttered grimly, 

"I wonder who has the rest." 



PhoneM.rkel54l7 



SAN FRANCISCO 



NA/M. F. EGAN 

M. ft. C. V. S. 

..VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D.. 



1155 GOLDEN GATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 



Telephone 

Home C 2458 



Lamanet Bros. 

Is the place of all places to get the very lateil and best in the way of 

Firemen's Regulation Shirts, 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents' Furnishing Goods 

Hats and Underwear, Etc. 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Douda, 3825 Phone Home C 2996 

MALERBI RESTAURANT 

MALERBl & FRUCOLI. Pro P i. 
....First Class Wines, Liquors and Cigars 

Reaular Week Day Meal,, Noon 35 centl. Evening 25 cenl, 
Sunday Meals 50 centl up 

546 Front St. near Jackson San Francisco 



Phone Merrill 4447 



H. G. WILLIAMS 



Agent Northern California for the 



Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 



1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



THE TRIPP REMEDY CO. 

POSITIVELY CURES 
Blood Poison, Chronic Catarrh, Rheumatism, 
Goitre, Tumorous Growths, Malaria, Erysipelas, 
Scrofula, Lupus, Tuberbular-Glands, Joints and 
all Blood Diseases 

479 TURK STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



the: 
PACIFIC FIR EM AN 

JOB DEPARTMENT 
IS NOW PREPARED TO PRINT 
LETTER HEADS 
BILL HEADS 
INVOICES 
STATEMENTS 
ENVELOPES 
BUSINESS CARDS 
WEDDING INVITATIONS 
SHIPPING TAGS 
BILLS OF FARE, ETC 
479 TURK STREET 
Phone FRANKLIN 6867 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 

Six hundred thousand Americans go abroad 
every year. 

Once the American tourist preferred a foreign 
watch. Now he goes to Europe with a Howard 
bought In ii — or comes back with a Howard 
bought there, 

1 [e lias an example in the ship's officer on 
the dock, who orders up the gang plank on 
Howard time. 

You find more and more of the responsible 
tneu i nrving Howard Watt Ins. 

'ill'' great railroads started it. The time In- 
spectors of ISO American railroads have officially 
■ ertified ami adopted tin- Howard. 

It is carried by leading technical men — by the 
heads of great industrial and commercial en- 
terprises — by scientists — bv army and navy 
Officers and government officials. 

Many a man buys a Howard for the sheer 
pleasure <if owning the watch that is so well 
si»iik'Ti of t>v nun whose opinion he respects. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pay for it. 

The price of each watch Is fixed at the fac- 
tory, and a print, d ticket attached — from the 
17-jewel (double roller) in a Credent Extra or 
BOS! Extra gold-filled case at $40. to the 23- 
j.-wl at $150— and the Edward Howard model 
at $350. 

Admiral Sigvhec has written a little bunk. 
"The I>>e "f the Howard Watch," giving the 
record of his own Howard in the U. S. Navy. 
You'll enjoy it. Drop us a post-card, Dept. N, 

and we'll Bend you a copy. 

HOWARD WATCH WORKS, Boston. Mass 



T. H. K1LGO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 

71 WALLER ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 

ROSENBERG = QABERT CO. 

INCORPORATED 

Oltuil auft military Sailors 

73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 

Present (his Add Mid receive $2.50 dlcouol on all Ceih Otderifor 
Civilian Clothe* 



Home phone S 2517 

The Little Emporium 

L. R1ZNIC Proprietor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 
2296-98 GEARY STREET 

Near Brodemk 



Telephone We»l 4824 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone Douglas 287 1 



Home C 4992 



WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 



WARRANT BROKERS 



630 KEARNY STREET 

COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Home J 2549 

EiVIIU SCHOENBEIN 

Fireman Cap Maker 

Formerly of 2 1st and Folsom 
...WILLIAMS.: BUILDING... 

THIRD STREET 

Cor. Mission. Room 307 SAN FRANCISCO 




VOL. IX. -NO. 35 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, AUGUST 31, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Plain Talk from a Canadian 
Fire Chief. 

A recent issue of the Montreal (Can.) 
Witness contained the following truly 
remarkable article: 

"A well-known Montrealer, Mr. L. 
Pillow, who has recently visited the 
Boston Fire Department, and returned 
with a number of interesting statistics 
regarding the work done there, and in 
company with a Witness reporter paid 
a visit this morning to Chief Tremblay 
of the Montreal department, when a 
very interesting discussion of the 
merits of the twodepartments ensued. 

"In Boston during the months of 
January, February, March, April and 
May past 1,112 alarms were responded 
to. In comparing the apparatus of 
the two departments, Chief Tremblay 
showed that Boston was only ahead 
of Montreal in the number of steam 
engines" here; Boston has 46, whereas 
Montreal has only 16, the Montreal 
engines are, however, stronger than 
the Boston engines. 

"Montreal requires fewer engines 
than Boston where the water pressure 
is very low, and it is necessary to use 
an engine almost every time a stream 
is required. In Montreal, in most 
parts of the city, the pressure on the 
hydrants is very good, and the ma- 
jority of fires are put out in this way, 
only five per cent being extinguished 
with the aid of the steam engine. 

"Chief Trimblay stated that he him- 
self has paid a visit to almost all the 
fire departments in America, and is 
confident that the Montreal depart- 
ment in equipment compares favora- 



bly with any of them, and Mr. Pillow 
agrees with the chief in this respect, 
and states that in a recent trip to the 
continent of Europe, where he visited 
the departments in many of the large 
cities he found in many respects, both 
in the size of apparatus and its effi- 
ciency, Montreal was ahead of these 
cities. In Berlin, Mr. Pillow said 
that he noted that their apparatus was 
fitted with search lights, which aided 
the men greatly at their work in the 
smoke, and also helped them in fer- 
reting their way through the streets 
at night. Chief Tremblay said that 
he thought that these lights would be 
very useful in Montreal, especially in 
snow storms. 

"Reverting again to the efficiency 
of the two departments, that of Bos- 
ton and that of Montreal, Chief Trem- 
blay stated that whereas the number 
of alarms responded to by both was 
about the same; in Boston nearly four 
millions of dollars is paid out annually 
for losses by fire insurance companies, 
while there is never a million dollars 
paid out in a single year in Montreal, 
and he stated that this could be ex- 
plained. 

"Taking Mr. Pillow and the repor- 
ter into his private office, he showed 
them a number of pictures of firemen 
at work on fires in Boston and other 
large American cities. The men could 
be seen standing in the street playing 
hose on the burning buildings by 
means of water towers, but seldom 
was a ladder in view — the men were 
not in the building. 'That is the rea- 
son,' saiil the chief, 'I hey light the 
fires from the outside, we fight llnm 
from tin' inside. It is quite simple in 



see that a man playing a hose from 
the outside of a building through 
an open window cannot do as efficient 
work as if he was in that room play- 
ing his hose on the fire itself. When 
he works from the street he can only 
hope to flood the building or room, and 
thus put the fire out. 

' 'The men in most cities on the 
other side of the line, and in many 
other places, are in the fire fighting 
business more for the money that is 
in it. Our men are in it because they 
love the risk and excitement, and our 
great trouble is not to get the men 
into the burning buildings, but to get 
them out. I make no insinuations as 
to the bravery of the American fire- 
men, for they are brave and have 
shown it when required, too, but they 
have not the same love of the danger 
and excitement of getting into burn- 
ing buildings that our men have. It 
is only this bravery of our men in this 
respect that has made them so suc- 
cessful, for all the conditions are 
against them. The roads and streets 
are narrow, all the electric wires are 
overhead, and half the year they have 
to fight the snow and ice as well as 
the fire.' " 

[Chief J. A. Tremblay is a promi- 
nent member of the International As- 
sociation of Fire Engineers.] 

According to the Insurance and In- 
vestment News of recent dale, the 
fire loss in ihe city of San Frani 
tor tin' first six months of this 5 ear 
was $326,000, which, with the excep- 
tion of 1906, is the smallest since 1900. 
There were 1771 alarms in 1!>11 and a 
lire lossof $711, 181.82, li isestimated 
that tlir amount of water used in mi.' 
year is 80,000,000 gallons. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Entire Department Has Two-Platoon. 

As the clock struck seven on the 
night of July 21, half the men of 
every fire company in Kansas City, 
Mo., left the stations to spend twelve 
hours with their wives and families. 
Fourteen of the thirty-eight compa- 
nies were put on the platoon system 
the week before and on July 21 the 
rest of the companies were includod 
in the plan. 

The men will alternate each month 
on night and day shifts. There are 
now 412 on the department pay-roll, 
half of whom are on duty all the time. 
Ninety-six new men have been added 
to the force. They were appointed 
pending civil service examinations. 
The examinations will be taken by all 
the firemen who have joined the force 
since the adoption of the new city 
charter in 1909. By a recent decision 
of the Fire and Water Board, those 
men who were appointed before that 
time will not be required to submit 
to the test. 

The men will be subject to recall to 
their station in case of a second alarm 
or other emergency. Plans have not 
been perfected as to how this will be 
done, but it is probable that some 
such scheme as is used in Omaha and 
other cities will be adopted. In these 
places the men are required to have a 
telephone in their homes and they are 
notified as soon as any emergency 
arises. 



for 2i-inch Hose, Water Supplies for 
Fires in Small Cities, Fire Exits and 
Fire Escapes, Theatres and Moving 
Picture Shows, Auto Apparatus on 
Steep Grades, The Auto Fire Appara- 
tus in Small Cities, The Advisability 
of Mixing Fire Alarm Systems. 

It is also expected that there will be 
a large exhibit of modern fire fighting 
apparatus which will be an education 
in itself. 



Topics to Be Discussed. 

At the 20th annual convention of 
the Pacific Coast Fire Chiefs' Asso- 
ciation the following papers will be 
read: 

Effects of Politics Upon Fire Depart- 
ments, Oil Tank Fires, Utility of Fire 
Cisterns, High Pressure Water Sys- 
tems, California Saw Mill Fires, Ven- 
eered Buildings, Gas Leakages and 
Explosions, Fireboats, The Future of 
Motor Apparatus, The Storage of Gas- 
oline, Chemical Fire Engine Systems, 
Spontaneous Combustion. Smoke Pro- 
tectors and Helmets, The Care of 
Auto Apparatus, Keeping Up Interest 
in Volunteer Departments. The Gas- 
oline Fire Engine, Basement Fires, 
How Should Volunteer Firemen Be 
Paid, Fires in Mines, Fire Abrm Sys- 
tems for Small Cities, Specificati >ns 



Police as Firemen is Hillsborough's Snag 

Again the Hillsborough Fire Depart- 
ment, which exists on paper in the 
executive offices of Mayor Brewer, is 
causing much ado among the club- 
men city fathers as to whether the 
municipal police department should 
act as firemen when the emergency 
arises. Chairman Samuel Knight of 
the fire committee believes that every 
policeman should respond whenever 
the fire bells ring. 

Chairman Henry T. Scott of the 
finance committee deems otherwise. 
He cannot see, even in the name of 
economy, why a policeman should con- 
vert himself into a fireman at a mo- 
ment's notice. The question of muni- 
cipal ethics was discussed at a special 
meeting recently of the trustees. 

Last month there were several fires, 
but in each instance either the volun- 
teer department of San Mateo or Bur- 
lingame extinguished the blaze. 

Firemen's Sleep to be Protected. 

The time-honored custom of having 
the alarm bell in every engine house 
in Cincinnati ring whenever there is 
a fire will be done away with if the 
plan Mayor Hunt has in mind is 
adopted. One night during the win- 
ti'i the mayor slept at Gift's engine 
house, and three times between mid- 
night and dawn he was awakened by 
the alarm bell, and the men hitched 
up. only to learn the fires were at 
some far-off point. 

The mayor is in favor of dividing 
the city into districts, and only those 
engine houses in the district be noti- 
fied of a blaze. A second alarm, or 
"ten blow" would also be provided 
for. Chief Bunker does not agree 
with Mayor Hunt altogether in the 
new idea, and both are giving the mat- 
ter a great deal of consideration. 



Fire Drills for Large Factories. 

In accordance with a resolution in- 
troduced by Supervisor A. J. Gallagher 
and adopted by the Board of Supervi- 
sors, an ordinance is to be submitted 
providing for a fire drill in factories 
and other large industrial establish- 
ments in San Francisco. Chief Mur- 
phy of the fire department has the 
drafting of an ordinance in hand and 
is engaged in bring it to as near per- 
fectiou as possible. As outlined the 
drills will be held not less than once 
in each quarter and will be under the 
direction and supervision of trained 
men of the fire department. — Record. 

Sacramento. 

[Underwriters' Report.] 

Fire Chief Anderson and Chief 
Electrician Pierce have planned the 
locations for21 fire alarm boxes, which 
are to be installed in Oak Park, a su- 
burb of Sacramento. 

The Sacramento Board of Trustees 
has given orders for the extension of 
tbe 12-inch water main on I street, 
from Thirtieth to Thirty-first streets. 
Work will be started at once. 

Fire Chief Anderson has filed notice 
of condemnation of two buildings on 
K street, which, through old age, 
have become a fire menace. Both 
buildings are one-story brick affairs, 
and are occupied by second-hand 
dealers. 

No More Horses. 

The Investment News of Los Ange- 
; les says: The new motor-driven hook 
and ladder apparatus recently acquir- 
ed by the San Francisco Fire Depart- 
ment is giving such thorough satisfac- 
tion that President Brandenstein of 
( the Fire Commission states that so far 
as the city is concerned no more horse- 
drawn apparatus will ever be purchas- 
ed. Motor-driven vehicles are rapidly 
supplanting the old apparatus on ac- 
count of increased efficiency and less 
i xpense, and a year or two will sptll 
the end of horses in the department. 

The fireman who had his vacation 
last winter can amuse himself this 
weather thinking bow cold it was then. 

Up in Oregon a fireman turned the 
hose on his chief, who promptly knock- 
ed him down. The fireman considered 
such conduct quite ungentlemanly and 
resigned. 



PACIFIC FLUE JULA..N 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Laurette Taylor's final appearance 
at the Alcazar, commencing with a 
matinee next Monday, will be in "Sev- 
en Sisters," the medium of her most 
pronounced success last season on 
Broadway. It is a comedy adapted 
from the Hungarian by Edith Ellis 
for Daniel Frohmau, who chose Miss 
Taylor from numerous applicants for 
the principal role and thus was the 
means of enabling her to convince the 
New York critics that she is a come- 
dienne with distinctive and forceful 
talents. In the coming production 
she will be supported by Forrest Stan- 
ley, Grace Carlyle (her first appear- 
ance as the Alcazar's spcond leading 
woman), Marie Baker (specially en- 
gaged) and the cream of the regular 
company. Following the Taylor sea- 
son at the Alcazar comes Ada Dwyer 
in "Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch," 
for one week only, which will close 
Forrest Stanley's very successful en- 
gagement as leading man in that play- 
house. 



Empress Theatre. 



"La Petite Gosse, " a picturesque 
and dramatic French wordless play 
with fourteen in the cast will be the 
headline at the Empress Sunday after- 
noon. With a sympathetic tenor voice 
of a golden quality and as mellow as 
a rippling stream, Jack Allman, the 
Irish tenor, will make his debut as the 
added feature. "The Leap Year 
Girls," a refreshingly original satire, 
teeming with comedy and bright dia- 
logue will be another feature attrac- 
tion. Joe Cook, a black-face come- 
dian, who kicked up such a laughing 
riot at the Empress a year ago is re- 
turning with a bunch of new stuff. 
Checkers Von Hampton, a clever 
young comedian of ability and Hazel 
Josselyn, a diminutive comedienne of 
grace, sweetness and agility, will offer 
songs, dances and piano playing in 
what they call "Bits of Musical Co- 
medy." Charles Lowe and Benjamin 
Edwards, two capable xylophonists, 
will delight with classic and popular 
melodies. Miss Ena Santoi, a singing 
comedienne with a pleasing repertoire 
of the latest melodies. Ed. Rice, a 
juggling comedian, and Twilight Pic- 
tures will conclude the bill. 



SEAGRAVE AERIAL 
MOTOR -DRIVEN HOOK AND LADDER TRUCK 




In service at Vancouver, B. C, Base, Idaho, San Diego and Los 

Angeles, California. 

Territory covered by the 
Gorham Fire Apparatus Company, Inc. 



SEATTLE 

82 & 84 W. Marion Street 



Sea.gra.ve Representatives' for the Pacific Shjn 

SAN FRANCISCO 
48 Fremont Street 



LOS ANGELES 

1223 S. Olive Street 



American Ru bber Mfg. Co. 

9-11 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office and Factories — Park Avenue and Watt Street, Oakland, Cal. 

WE MANUFACTURE A COMPLETE LINE OF 

Mechanical Rubber Goods, Cotton Fire Hose, Engine Suction Hose, Brass 
Goods, Valves and All Fire Department Supplies 



When YouVe Buyin 9 Oil 

buy a good oil Panhard, for instance. You owe it 

to your motor (and your purse) to 
feed it the best lubricant money 

can buy 

unless, of course, you are married 
to the repair man. 

But be careful don't merely ask the dealer for a 

good oil, say 

PANHARD OIL 

BERNARD I. BILL 

Sole Distributor for the Pacific Const S43 (ioldt-n rinte Aw- . San Francisco 





PACIFIC FIREMAN 




PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 
BY 

JAS. K. MACK Editor and Proprietor 

To whom all checks and money orders should 
be made payable. 

H. G. PRESTON Business Manacer 

I =^- 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year, in advance $2.00 

Six months 1.00 

ADVERTISEMENTS 

Inserted on the most favorable terms, especially large and 

continuous ones. 

Editorial Rooms and Business Office. 479 Turk Street. 
San Francisco. Telephone Franklin 6867. 

Entered as second-class matter March 21. 1908, at the 
Postoffice at San Francisco. Cal.. under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 2. 1879. 

SATURDAY AUGUST 31. 1912 



The trouble with the so called self-made 
man is that the part of his head he talks with 
is too bis for the part he thinks with. 

The long delayed Civil Service examination 
of engineers in the San Francisco Fire De- 
partment will be held September 21. You 
may now file your application at the City Hall. 

We have heard a great deal about the dis- 
interested affection of animals. The writer 
takes no stock in all these yarns. An ani- 
mal's affection is parasitic. Your dog loves 
you because you feed it. The same holds 
good in man. 



One of the papers of this city, in telling of 
the birth of the Astor baby, said: "The visit 
of the stork had been expected for days." 
This takes a load off our mind, for we feared 
the child had been born accidentally, don't 
you know, when they wern't looking. We 
imagine when babies are born without a few 
days' notice the event must come with a 
sudden shock, or words to that effect. 



Nature to take it course. Has the intelligent 
man ever done this? No. Civilization itself, 
with all that it has accomplished, is the re- 
sult of man's not letting things alone. Take 
the matter of fighting fires as an example, if 
Nature was allowed to take its course, we 
would, like our forefathers of 60 years ago, 
be standing in a line passing buckets from 
one to another, instead of utilizing fire en- 
gines and motor apparatus. The trouble with 
the real producers is that they are inoculated 
with the laissez faire doctrine, and in a ma- 
jority of cases, do everything they can to 
keep the light from reaching them. 

In an interview in the Call of Thursday, 
speaking of spite fences, Chief Murphy said 
in part: "These spite fences, sanctioned by 
the Supreme Court and to be found in nearly 
every section of the city, might be the cause 
some day of a serious conflagration. A fire- 
man can't tell what to do under such circum- 
stances as were presented at the Hayes street 
fire, especially when he realizes that human 
lives depend on quick action. I consider spite 
fences a relic of barbarism, and nothing short, 
in the majority of cases, of death traps. The 
proposed ordinance to prohibit any fence be- 
ing erected in the city to a height of more 
than 10 feet should be put into effect at once." 

The Exempt Firemen 

of this city have petitioned the Board of Su- 
pervisors to submit an amendment to the City 
Charter at the coming election so that a 
greater amount than $10 a month can be paid 
the old fire fighters of the city. It is pointed 
out in the petition that the present firemen 
draw pensions from $50 to $208 a month. 
There are but 125 of the exempt firemen 
alive, and the youngest member is now sev- 
enty years of age. For the few years that 
these men will need assistance from the city 
it is proposed to allow them about $35 a 
month if the citizens will give the necessary 
authorization. 



A fire early Monday morning at Fresno, 
believed to have been started by firebugs, 
burned four dwellings, 200 tons of hay and 
did damage to the extent of $35,000. The 
fact that the fire broke out in four different 
parts of the barn belonging to O. M. Thomp- 
son Contracting Company caused the police 
officials to believe that incendiaries set the 
blaze off. Nobody was badly injured, but 
four stablemen had narrow escapes. 

It is said that all motor apparatus of this 
department will be equipped with Everready 
starters. R. F. Oaks, president of the Ever- 
ready Company of this city, says of it: "The 
great advantage claimed for the Everready 
self-starter is that it spins the motor naturally 
ami at a much greater speed than canbedone 
by hand. The Everready starter turns the 
ordinary motor over from seven to ten revo- 
lutions at a rate of 200 per minute, thereby 
making it possible to at all times start direct 
on the magneto, instead of being compelled 
to use batteries asan auxiliary for starting." 

The people who believe in extreme individ- 
ualism tell us to let things alone and a.U.w 



The Double Shift. 



Speaking of the Two-Platoon System in this 
department, every member should carefully 
read over every proposed amendment and en- 
deavor to find out where he is benefitted or 
not and act accordingly. Now is the time to 
act. Don't wait until the amendment is passed 
and then wake up to the fact that it is 
t >o late, or that you didn't know. Read them 
all over and inform yourself of the important 
issues at stake. 

Don't swallow all the hot air about it that 
you come in contact with, as you must be 
well aware that you have had quite a lot of it 
in the past. Make up your mind and go 
about it in the right way, and then if the 
people see fit to give it to you it will be per- 
manent. Get out your petitions and rustle 
for signatures and put it up to them, and if 
they see fit to grant it it will take a vote of 
the people to repeal it. 

Captain Sewell of engine 30 is acting police 
photographer in the absence of Ge.orge W. 
Blum, who is away on vacation. 



Around the Bay Cities. 

[Special Correspondence.] 

The Haywards Fire Department will hold a 
picnic at Laurel Grove Park on Sunday, Sep- 
tember 15. Chief Riggs has appointed a com- 
mittee to manage the affair. A baseball game 
between the Haywards Department and the 
Native Sons will he one of the features of 
the day. The San Leandro and other depart- 
ments will be invited to participate and the 
proceeds will go towards the upkeep of the 
department. 

Livermore is planning on installing a new 
fire alarm system, as Chief McVicar thinks 
this is the next most important improvement 
in the way of fire protection. 

The Oakland Commissioners have passed 
an ordinance providing for emergency vacan- 
cies in the fire department by creating a po- 
sition for fifteen substitute firemen at $1212 a 
year. These men will take the place of a re- 
gular fireman in case of an injury or sickness. 
The Piedmont Volunteer Fire Department 
has been kept busy for the last week putting 
out grass fires that threatened to do serious 
harm to property. They also had a chance to 
exercise their combination chemical and hose 
wagon. 

When the Del Mar Apartments, located in 
the Lakeside district in Oakland, caught fire 
last week, John Fernandez of engine 15 felt 
his way through the dense smoke that filled 
the halls and rescued the daughter of the pro- 
prietress, who was on the fourth floor of the 
building sick in bed. It is believed that the 
building took fire from a defective flue, and 
the loss will amount to over $2,000, caused 
mostly by water and smoke. 

Death of Battalion Chief Farley. 

Battalion Chief Farley, aged 49, who has 
been ill for some time, died at his home in 
this city last Sunday, and his funeral took 
place Wednesday morning. The usual detail 
of firemen accompanied the remains. He 
joined the department in 1892, and was a 
member of the Widows and Orphans' and 
Mutual Aid Associations, also of two or three 
fraternal societies. His funeral was largely 
attended. Interment was in Holy Cross 
Cemetery. 

Fireman Appreciated. 

Victoria, B. C, Aug. 25 /12. 

Jas. K. Mack. 479 Turk Street 

San Francisco. Cal. 

Dear Sir: — 1 enclose express order for $2.00 
for the Pacific Fireman. I have been in the 
hospital for the last seven weeks. I am writ- 
ing thison my back in bed. Wishing you and 
the Pacific Fireman every success, I remain 
Yours truly. 

F. W. Zieler 
Captain No. 1 Truck, Victoria, B. C. 

Theo. Howatt, a retired lumber man. and 
Bill Wilson, formerly a big rancher and horse 
breeder, both genial fellows, occasionally 
drop into the quarters of truck 1 and enjoy a 
game of cards. 

The Pacific Fireman $2.00 a year. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



San Francisco Fire Commissioners 

The Board of Fire Commissioners met in 
regular session Friday, August 30 (President 
Brandenstein absent) and transacted (he fol- 
lowing business: 

From the chief engineer, submitting a re- 
port from Hydrantman Rice relative to an 
accident whereby Hydrantmen John Wynn 
and Frank Dillon were injured while respond- 
ing to an alarm of tire on the 28th instant. 

From Edward Sheets, temporary fireman 
fireboat 2, tendering his resignation to take 
effect from the 24th instant. Accepted. 

From Fred J. Bowlen, truckman truck 10r 
requesting that he be granted a leave of ab- 
sence, without pay, from September 1 to Oc- 
tober 1, on account of sickness. Referred to 
chief with full power to act. 

From W. J. Conroy, lieutenant truck 8, re- 
questing that he be granted a leave of ab- 
sence, without pay. for fifteen days, com- 
mencing September 1st, on account of ill 
health. Granted. 

From the Superintendent of Horses, re- 
porting the death of Gustave Rapp, hostler 
at the department stables, on the 23rd instant, 
from injuries received by leing kicked by a 
horse. Letter of condolence ordered sent to 
family. 

From the Executive Committee of the com- 
mittee in charge of the two-platoon system, 
requesting permission to participate in the 
Labor Day parade. All members off duty 
that day to parade in uniform. 

From the Civil Service Commission, thank- 
ing the Board for use of wagon on the 20th 
inst. and requesting the use of same on the 
31st inst. Granted. 

From the Civil Service Commission, notify- 
ing this Board that the temporary appoint- 
ments of B. Medus, W. ('lark, J. Whelan and 
E. Ford as firemen were approved for a pe- 
riod of six days. Filed. 

From the Civil Service Commission, certi- 
fying (he names of Thns. J. Kellv, Edmund 
R. Dnherty and John F. Meacham as captain. 
Laid over. 

From the Civil Service Commission, certi- 
fying the names id' Bartletl F. Jones, How- 
ard Marsden and James Walsh for appoint- 
ment as lieutenant. Laid over. 

From the Civil Service Commission, oerti- 
fying the following names from its eligible 
list of firemen for probationary appointment 

in i his department; Th is Walsh as hose 

man, Aloysius VV. Quinn as truckman, ('has. 
Hailing as driver and Edward J. Hunter as 
truckman. Appointed and referred to chief 
for BJiErignmenl . 

From the Civil Service Commission, certi- 
fying the following n. inns from us eligible 
list of firemen for temporary appointment as 
substitutes in tins department; George M. 
Healy, Edward J. Doherty, Dennis J. Roche 
and Waller I) Grillin. Referred to chief. 

From i lc chief of police, thanking the 
Board for allowing Captain Sevvell to do pho- 
tographic work in thai department in (he ab- 
sent f their official photographer. Filed, 

From the White Company, relative to the 



purchase of chassis for steam fire engines. 
Laid over. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Matter of award of contract on motor- 
driven chemical engines. Laid over. 

Matter of award of contract on combination 
chemical and hose wagon. Laid over. 

Matter of receiving bids for card system 
for assignment of companies in responding to 
alarms of fire. Bids opened and taken under 
consideration. 

"Gene" Mulligan appeared before the Board 
as a grievence committee from the relief en- 
gineers of the department to protest against 
the action of the Civil Service Commission in 
rating the relief engineers on experience at 
one-third the credits given outsiders, and 
asked the Fire Commissioners to take some 
action to prevent this injustice, 

Wednesday Morning's Fire. 

At a very earlv hour Wednesday morning a 
fire broke out in a three-story building and 
the adjoining flats at 806, 80S and 810 Masonic 
avenue near Hayes and the lives of half a 
dozen people were endangered by the rapid 
spread of the flames. A high board fence 
behind the burning houses cut off a way of 
escape from several shacks in the rear of the 
tall apartment building and it was with diffi- 
culty that firemen rescued a mother and two 
children. 

The blaze spread so rapidly after the alarm 
was turned in by a chauffeur that a second 
and a third alarm was immediately sounded. 
The sleeping people in the buildings were 
aroused and many of them escaped only in 
their night clothes. Among them were Mrs. 
A. Ringler, Mrs. F Donaldson, Mrs. Cazadora 
and two children, Mrs. C. Neardsley and two 
daughters, J. W. Lewis and Mrs. Irwin 
Walter. 

An indirect result of the fire was the injury 
of Mis. C. P Moody and three hydrant men 
of the corporation yard. The hydrant men 
started tor the fire and at Valencia and Fif- 
teenth streets hailed the passing auto of Mrs. 
Moody. They were picked up and started for 
i he lire at top speed. At Valencia and Thir- 
teenth streets the auto skidded, crashing into 
a building and overturned. They were taken 
to the Central Emergency Hospital, where 
Mrs Moody was found to he suffering from a 
drenched hack and possible internal injuries. 
John Wynn and [•'rank Dillon, hydrant men, 

were badly bruised. 'I he loi-s is estimated tit 
$20,000. 

Personal Mention. 

Fredrick son of engine 2 has a neat bunga- 
low at HI Verano. IFyou are going that way 
drop ill on him. 

When you are down town eoi your sinoh. s 

at the "Smoke Inn,'' presided over by the 
genial Eddie Healy, west of th.' City Hall. 



One of the boys ol t rind, company 1 says 
Cadigan of engine -13 won't have to keep up 
that steady jiggle on himself since a * 'Chink" 
: w iped his Wat erbury watch. 

lloseman Shanahaii of engine 13 in less 



than two minutes from the time he leaves the 
apparatus floor is sound asleep. He is the only 
fireman who can successfully do this stunt. 

Two of the "finest" from the Central Po- 
lice Station arrested an Irishman for being 
intoxicated. " I see you're here again, 
O'Brien," said the judge. "Who brought 
you here?" O'Brien pointed out the two offi- 
cers. "Drunk, I suppose," said his honor. 
"Yes, both of them," said O'Brien. 



The other night a fireman on his night off 
had a nightmare. He got out of bed and con- 
nected the hot water bag to the wash basin 
and started to play the water on a red flannel 
shirt. His wife woke him up and asked him 
did he hear a bell and he said "yes." She 
said, "Which one?" He said, "My Baby 
Rose." They are divorced now. 



Hoseman Bill Harrington of engine 4o will 
be hitched up as fast as the law and the 
church can do it to an estimable young lady 
of this city September 3. The happy couple 
will spend their honeywoon in the wilds of 
Mt. Shasta. What makes this auspicious 
event doubly interesting, Bill has fallen heir 
to K000 "bucks" from his uncle. 



We ran up against Boghera and Johnson 
Thursday afternoon, two of the "finest," as 
they were going on duty. "If we were back 
on the old job we'd be just about this time 
getting up to get our eats," said Boghera. 
The men who discarded the cap and silver 
buttons for the helmet and club are said to 
be the handsomest men on the force. 

It is reported that it cost Lantbom of fire- 
boat 1 in the neighborhood of $20 to transport 
a load of wood from the Harrison street wharf 
to lis home last week. And now it is rumored 
the U. R. R. people are about to prosecute 
him for holding up its cars some 35 minutes, 
by his conveyance breaking down, scattering 
the wood all over its tracks for half a block. 

Captain Shea of the Southern Police Sta- 
tion was standing at Fifth and Mission streets 
the other day when a minister came out of the 
United Stales Mint and asked him the way to 
the Postofhce. He told him it. was on the 
northwest corner of Seventh and Mission 
streets, two blocks west. The minister then 
gave liitil a card and toll] him to come to hJS 
church next Sili:d;i\ and he would show him 
the wa\ to heaven. "Whj . ' id the 
'■ i ou don't know where tin Pustoffice is. " 

"I'm .always afraid when 1 go home in lb'' 
evening," says the man with the desiccated 
hair, "that I'll find that my wife has taken 
one leg of in y best trousers for a hobble skirt." 



I . I, cli.. ii<- i i(inul/i, (2 >j 

L. J. HORCK, '»' '*""« 

M \kl - A SP1 I i \I 1\ 'I 

FIUKMKN'S '. ' UINll-OUMiS 

ALSO FINE civil. I \\ SUITS 
93 I DDY STRI I I San I ram 

Subscribe for the Pacific Firem \\ 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Magnolia Nurseries 

Cor. 22nd and Douglass Sts. 



JOSEPH JACQUEMET & CO. 

...FLORISTS... 



Fresh cut flowers and boquets always on hand. Also 

ornamental and flowering plants in variety. 

Special attention given tei Wedding and Funeral Orders. 

Artistic Decorations and Designs. 

Gardening, Etc. 

TELEPHONE MISSION 1553 

To Reach Nurseries, take Castro street car to 23rd. or 

Mission, 24th street and Hoffman avenue car 

to Douelass and 24th streets. 



p k . i Douslas 4934 

Ph ° n "< Home C 2842 



Ph. 



| Wen . 566 
°""< HomeS 3174 



Serveau Bros. 

FLORISTS 

128 POST ST. 2110-2114 FILLMORE ST 



1 12 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 



717 K Street 
Sacramento 



EAGLESON & CO. 

Importers and Manufacturers 

MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS AND SHIRTS 
Navy Flannel Regulation Fire Shirts 

1118 MARKET ST.. opp. Seventh 



Dreams of Him. 

I dream of you, dear Maurice, 
When I just am waking up, 

I see your loving eyes and nose 
Within my coffee cup. 

I dream of you all morning, 

At noon and supper time, 
When I go to order the groceries, 

I dream of you in rhyme. 

I dream of you when I'm ironing 

Or powdering my chin, 
And also when at milking time 

The cows come walking in. 

I dream of you, dear Maurice, 
When I'm sprinkling the lawn, 

But, to save my soul, I cannot dream 
When I to sleep have gone. 

Somehow, when the day is over 
And real dream-time gets to me, 

I must confess, dear Maurice, 
I never can dream of thee. 



Howard Watches 

SOLD FOR CASH OR ON INSTALLMENTS 

Six hundred thousand Americans go abroad 
every year. 

Once the American tourist preferred a foreign 
watch. Now he goes Co Europe with a Howard 
bought here — or comes back with a Howard 
bought there. 

He has an example in the ship's officer on 
the dock, who orders up the gang plank on 
Howard time. 

You find more and more of the responsible 
men carrying Howard Wait ins. 

The great railroads started it. The time in- 
spectors of 180 American railroads have officially 
certified and adopted the Howard. 

It is carried by leading technical men — by the 
heads of great Industrial and commercial en- 
i< ntists — by army and navy 
officers and government officials. 

.Many a man buys a Howard for the sheer 
lil.iisure of owning the watch that is so well 
spoken "f by in- n whose opinion he respects. 

A Howard Watch is always worth what you 
pay for it . 

Tin- price of each watch Is fixed at the fac- 
tory ami :. print.-.] ticket attached— from the 
17-i.-w>-l .double roller) in a Crescent Extra or 
Boas Extra gold-fllted case at S40. to the 23- 
Jewel at $150— and the Edward Howard model 

* Admiral Sigsbee has written a little book. 
Th«- Log .T the Howard Watch." giving the 

re. -old of his own Howard in the U". S. Navy. 
You'll enjoy it. Drop us a post-card, Dept. N, 
and we'll send you a copy. 
HOWARD WATCH WORKS. Boston, Mass 



Phone Marltel 5417 



SAN FRANCISCO 



\A/M. F. EGAN 

M. R. C. V. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON TO S. F. F. D.. 



1155 GOLDEN DATE AYE. 

Telephones Park 117 and 118 San Francisco. Cal. 



Phone Merrill 4447 



H. G. WILLIAMS 



Agent Northern California for the 



Phoenix Fire Appliance Co 



1248 Thirteenth Avenue. Oakland 



Telephone 
Home C 2458 



Lamanet Bros. 

h the place of alt places to get the very latest and best in the way of 

Firemen's Regulation Shirts, 

Firemen's Turnout Suits Gents* Furnishing Goods 

Hats and Underwear, Etc. 

524 BROADWAY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Donald 3825 Phone Home C 2996 

MALERBI RESTAURANT 

MALERBI & FRUGOLI. Props 
....First Class Wines, Liquors and Cigars.... 

Rrtfulai Week Day Meals, Noon 35 cents. Evening 25 cents 
Sunday Meals 50 cents up 

5-46 Front St. near Jackson San Francisco 



THE TRIPP REMEDY CO. 

POSITIVELY CURES 

Blood Poison, Chronic Catarrh, Rheumatism, 
Goitre, Tumorous Growths, Malaria, Erysipelas, 
Scrofula, Lupus, Tuberbular-Glands, Joints and 
all Blood Diseases 

479 TURK STREET SAN FRANCSCO 



the: 

PAC1FICFIREMAN 

JOB DEPARTMENT 
IS NOW PREPARED TO PRINT 

LETTER HEADS 

BILL HEADS 

INVOICES 

STATEMENTS 

ENVELOPES 

BUSINESS CARDS 

WEDDING INVITATIONS 

SHIPPING TAGS 

BILLS OF FARE. ETC 

479 TURK STREET 

Phone FRANKLIN 6867 



T. H. KILGO 

DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY 

71 WALLER ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 



ROSENBERG = QABERT CO. 



INCORPORATED 



CCtuil aufc iflUttarti aailnrs 

73 ELLIS ST . . Near Powell 

Present this Add and receive $2.50 dticounl on all Cash Ordersfo 
Civilian Clothes 



Home phone S 2517 

The Little Emporium 

L. R1ZN1C Proprielor 

FIREMEN'S NAVY BLUE FLANNEL SHIRTS 

UNDERWEAR A SPECIALTY 
2296-98 GEARY STREET 

Neat Bioderklc 
Telephone Weal 4824 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone Douglas 287 1 



Home C 4992 



WILLIAM SCHMALZ & SON 

WAR RANT BROKERS 

630 KEARNY STREET 

COR. COMMERCIAL SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Home J 2549 



EMIL SCHOENBFJN 

Fireman Cap Maker 

Fotmerly of 21st and Folsom 
...WILLIAMS.'. BUILDING... 

THIRD STREET 

Cor. Mission. Room 307 SAN FRANCISCO 




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VOL. IX. -NO. 36 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1912. 



Single Copies 5 Cents 



Wants Legal Power to Act. 



At the meeting of the Civil Service 
Commission, held Aug. 22, President 
Walcott presented the following reso- 
lution and ditected the secretary to ask 
the city attorney as to whether or not 
the Commission has the legal power to 
adopt it: 

Whereas, The position of assistant 
engineer of the fire department is one 
of great responsibility, in which the 
highest available talent for fighting 
fires should be secured; and 

Whereas, The rules and classifica- 
tions adopted by the Civil Service 
Commission limit the persons eligible 
to take an examination for assistant 
chief to those who have been ap- 
pointed to the position of battalion 
chief; and 

Whereas, Not more than thirteen 
persons are eligible to take such ex- 
amination under the classification as 
heretofore existing, and 

Whereas, It is the judgment of this 
Commission that the public advantage 
will be served by opening the exami- 
nation to a larger number of men who 
have had experience in the fire de- 
partment; and 

Whereas, There are now seventy- 
three men of experience holding posi- 
tions of captains in the fire depart- 
ment; be it 

/.'■ tolved, That, under the powers 
conferred by Sod ion 2 and Section 8 
of Article XIII, this Commission does 
establish as the next lower rani; for 
the purpose of such examinations and 
for no other purpose, the list of mem- 
bers of the fire department holding 
the positions of battalion chiefs, and 



those holding the positions of captains; 
therefore be it 

Resolved, That Section 2 of Division 
L, Part Two (Old Series), of the classi- 
fication of the classified Civil Service, 
be amended in accordance with notice 
given July 18, 1912, to read as follows: 

Section 2, Fire Department. Class 
I fireman to lieutenant; class II lieu- 
tenant to captain; class III captain to 
battalion chief; class IV captain and 
battalion chief to assistant chief en- 
gineer. 

Examination of Engineers of Fire Engines 

An examination of civil service ap- 
plicants for positions as engineers of 
fire engines will be held by the Com- 
mission in the Mission High School 
building. Eighteenth and Dolores 
streets, beginning at 1:30 p. m. Sat- 
urday. September 21, 1912. 

The subjects of the examination 
and the relative weights of the sub- 
jects on a scale of 100 are: Knowl- 
edge and care of engines, 20; knowl- 
edge and care of pumps, 15; know ledge 
and care of boilers, 20; writing of re- 
port, 10; experience, 25; physical 
ability. 10. 

"Writing of Report" will be a test 
of the applicant's ability to write a 
correct report upon a subjeel to be 
named by the Civil Service Connnis 
sion. 

Under the heading "Experience" 
credits will be awarded for experience 
had as an engineer of steam i ngines, 
as a machinist or as a relief engineer 
of fire engines, as follows: 

(a) Five years" e> perience had in 
San Francisco within (he last seven 
years as an engineer of steam engines, 



100 credits; four years, 90; three 
years, 80; two years, 70; one year, 50; 
Such experience had outside of San 
Francisco, but within the State of 
California, will be rated in accordance 
with the foregoing plan, but with a 
ten per cent deduction; experience 
had outside of the State of California 
will be rated in the same manner but 
with a twenty percent deduction. 

(b) Experience as machinist will be 
marked in the same manner as that of 
engineer of steam engines, but at one- 
half rate. 

(c) Experience as relief engineer of 
fire engines will also be marked in the 
same manner as that of engineer of 
steam engines, but at one-third rate. 

Applicants must be citizens of the 
United States, net less than twenty- 
one nor more than thirty-five years of 
age, residents of San Francisco for at 
least five years next preceding the 
date of examination, and must pass a 
physical examination before doctors 
appointed by the Commission. Appli- 
cations must be made on Form 40. 
Receipt of applications closes at 5 p. 
m. Monday, September Hi. 1912. 

Locomotives Fquipped for Fighting Fires. 

A Philadelphia press dispatch of 
Sept. 2, says; Steam railway loeomo- 
tives as fire fighters have proved so 
efficacious on the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road that (he conn any has equipped 
612 engines with special fire-fighting 
pparatui < F pun ps ami hose, li is 
attached to locomotives regularly ured 
in switching cars. Thecrewst i tobe 
systematitally trained as lire tie. hi, rs. 
The yards are divided into districts. 
numbi red as are tire alarm boxes in 

cities. When a lire isdisroverei .alarm 

whistles are blow n and engine drivers 

call tell .iusl w here I In' fire is. 



PACIFIC FIREMAN 



Meeting of Petaluma's Fire Commission- 

At the regular monthly meeting of 
the Petaluma Board of Fire Commis- 
sioners, held Wednesday, August 28, 
Chief Adams, who had been authoriz- 
ed to attend the Fire Chiefs' Conven- 
tion at Denver instead of Los Angeles, 
prefers going to Los Angeles, as Pe- 
taluma's new engine is to be exhibited 
there. 

It was decided to add three new 
alarm boxes and move old ones to 
more important sections of the city. 

After the new auto engine goes into 
commission the Board will not pay for 
hauling the apparatus of the volunteer 
companies to fires, with the exception 
of the hook and ladder truck; a tractor 
for that machine, it is said, is one of 
the possibilities in the near future. 

T. V. Peters of hook and ladder No. 
1 was unanimously chosen as driver 
of the new auto chemical and pump. 
Peters will have to purchase a new 
regulation uniform, and a set of brand 
new rules are to be provided. Driver 
Mott is also to be taught the modus 
operandi of the new auto chemical 
and will handle the machine whenever 
Peters is absent. 

President Fredericks reported to 
the Board that he had made a formal 
request of the City Council for an ad- 
ditional $1000 to be added to the bud- 
get of fire department maintenance 
for the next fiscal year. 

Captain Flohr was authorized to se- 
cure badges of the former Board of 
Fire Wardens and turn them over to 
the Commissioners. 

Many other matters, such as alarms 
for the current month, bills for horse 
shoeing, lighting apparatus at fire 
stations, care for fire horse after new 
apparatus arrives, bonfires inside city 
limits, etc., were satisfactorily dis- 
posed of, when the Board adjourned. 

Three Companies in One House. 

Fire Commissioner Joseph Johnson, 
New York City, has planned a big 
extension of the fire department, and 
expects that it will be completed in- 
side of a year. He intends to add 
sixty new companies to the organiza- 
tion, and to man these companies more 
than 700 more firemen will be re- 
quired. 

The commissioner decided that in 



extending the service he would install 
automobile apparatus instead of ma- 
chines drawn by horses, so he has in- 
vited proposals for the construction of 
twenty-eight automobile fire engines 
of the second class. The machines are 
to have steam pumps instead of gaso- 
line pumps. 

There are forty-two new engine 
houses now under construction in the 
new and the old parts of the city. 
Some of them will be completed this 
fall. When they are ready for occu- 
pancy the commissioner is going to 
introduce a new feature in the fire de- 
partment. He is going to have three 
companies in some fire houses. 

Some of the newly organized com- 
panies are to be put in service in 
Queens to supersede the volunteer 
firemen. There are now thirteen vol- 
unteer companies in Newton and nine 
companies in Woodhaven. The com- 
missioner expects to appoint 400 new 
firemen this fall as soon as some of 
the new houses are comp